Can you do Vehicular Cycling without Sweating?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Andymorris, Aug 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    I certainly find it difficult to assert myself on the roads with out the occasional sprint and
    subsequent glow, but then I am a bit of a fat git.

    The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for the VC vs.
    Facilities debate?

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
    Tags:


  2. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], AndyMorris <[email protected]> typed:
    >
    > The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for the VC vs.
    > Facilities debate?

    The problems with facilities do not change. The experience averaged across all types of cyclists
    (of which assertive riders are in the minority and less likely to use facilities) is that
    facilities are much more dangerous. They still don't cover all the journeys so you still have to
    learn to ride with traffic to go most places and using them reduces your and motorists conditioning
    to each others presence.

    Tony
     
  3. Thomas

    Thomas Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I certainly find it difficult to assert myself on the roads with out the occasional sprint and
    > subsequent glow, but then I am a bit of a fat git.
    >
    > The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for
    the
    > VC vs. Facilities debate?

    No, but then I'm a sweaty geezer.

    However, I /can/ do circular breathing without breaking into a sweat...

    Thomas.
     
  4. Andy Morris says:

    > I certainly find it difficult to assert myself on the roads with out the occasional sprint and
    > subsequent glow, but then I am a bit of a fat git.
    >
    > The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for the VC vs.
    > Facilities debate?

    I'm 62 years old, and a couple of years ago something went wrong with my diaphragm, so I can't
    breathe properly any more - I didn't really understand what breathing from one's diaphragm meant
    until I couldn't do
    it. The resulting lack of excercise hasn't helped my weight, either.

    I'm slow, trundling round at 12 mph, or less. VC still works perfectly well at that speed, and ought
    to, even if going even more slowly.

    Of course, below about 6 mph, one starts to wobble enough so as to concentrate less on one's
    surroundings, but that's usually only a problem with little children just learning to ride.

    I think that if you are sprinting, you are being driven by your inner demons, not by any traffic
    realities. If you are trying to get into a gap that is too small, you didn't start looking for
    suitable gaps soon enough.

    Jeremy Parker
     
  5. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Jeremy Parker wrote:
    >
    > I think that if you are sprinting, you are being driven by your inner demons, not by any traffic
    > realities. If you are trying to get into a gap that is too small, you didn't start looking for
    > suitable gaps soon enough.
    >

    Probably very true, I do get a real buzz out of riding in traffic, I should probably try to calm
    down a bit.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  6. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > In news:[email protected], AndyMorris <[email protected]> typed:
    >>
    >> The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for the VC vs. Facilities
    >> debate?
    >
    > The problems with facilities do not change. The experience averaged across all types of cyclists
    > (of which assertive riders are in the minority and less likely to use facilities) is that
    > facilities are much more dangerous. They still don't cover all the journeys so you still have to
    > learn to ride with traffic to go most places and using them reduces your and motorists
    > conditioning to each others presence.
    >

    I'm not made keen on 'facilities' either. Most on road ones are a real mess, a lot of off road ones
    aren't suitable for transport as the surface is crap (and consequently slow and hard work) and don't
    go anywhere.

    I do worry about the way cycling is changing from a means of transport into a leisure pursuit.

    Sometimes facilities make this worse, I've seen people drive to the Spen Valley Greenway, near where
    I live, and get bikes off the back to go for a ride. On the other hand I know people who use it as
    part of their commute and as a way around the horrendous chainbar roundabout, which scares the hell
    out of me and a lot of club cyclist avoid.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  7. Doobrie

    Doobrie Guest

    > I'm not made keen on 'facilities' either. Most on road ones are a real mess, a lot of off road
    > ones aren't suitable for transport as the surface is crap (and consequently slow and hard work)
    > and don't go anywhere.
    >
    > I do worry about the way cycling is changing from a means of transport into a leisure pursuit.

    im north birmingham based and the odd time i come across cycle paths i usually just avoid them like
    the plague ... theres a couple ive just had to stop and think about where they were going just to
    make sense of them at all - they're crazy ... and usually find lamposts and street signs in the
    centre of them too or they lead to dead ends and just finish

    it'd make more sense to send street cleaners around all the roads and clean up the section of road
    on the kerb side from all the stones, debris and glass that seem to accumulate
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 00:17:51 +0100, "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I certainly find it difficult to assert myself on the roads with out the occasional sprint and
    >subsequent glow, but then I am a bit of a fat git.

    Solution; keep cycling :)

    >The obvious follow on is that if you can't what are the consequences for the VC vs.
    >Facilities debate?

    Not sure what you mean. Vehicular cycling is about the destination, not the route. Obviously a
    vehiculr cyclist is more likely to be on the roads, because cycle routes tend to serve leisure
    destinations (or no destination at all) but the average vehicular cyclist will not pass up a cycle
    route that provides a short cut or bypasses a difficult junction, just because it is not a road.

    And what does this have to do with sweating? Sweating is a matter of how briskly you ride. You
    can ride at a very stately pace on the roads in safety as long as you follow the advice of
    Guru Franklin.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com New!
    Improved!! Now with added extra Demon!
     
  9. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Not sure what you mean. Vehicular cycling is about the destination, not the route.

    I understand 'vehicular cycling' to mean cycling as if you are a proper vehicle -- i.e. taking up
    your rightful place on the road -- assertive cycling. Its all about the route (well the positioning
    on the road) and little about destination.

    But maybe your irony generator has just overloaded!!

    T
     
  10. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> wrote:

    : And what does this have to do with sweating? Sweating is a matter of how briskly you ride. You can
    : ride at a very stately pace on the roads in safety as long as you follow the advice of Guru
    : Franklin.

    I'm not sure. There's one particular roundabout in York (Grimston Bar for those that know York).
    It's about 1/2 mile round, has a mix of traffic lights and slip roads and is very, very busy.

    I find the safest way to tackle it is at 30mph. This resutls in my sweating :)

    It's actually not an issue for me personally since I only cross the roundabout if I'm out for a ride
    rather than commuting, but I don't think I'd fancy doing the roundabout at a pace that would let me
    not sweat.

    Arthur
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...