Cannondale component quality?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Pat Lamb, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    I'm looking for a new ride, and Cannondale is one brand I've been
    looking at. I'm a bit curious, though, about their use of house-brand
    components. For example, given a choice between Cannondale Wind hubs
    and Shimano LX hubs, are there issues with the Cannondale hubs as far as
    interoperability with "standard" clusters, freehub bodies, and spokes?
    How do the bearings and seals compare?

    Is there anything similar to look out for with seatposts or stems? Is a
    seatpost a seatpost, as long as it's the right diameter? Do all stems
    have to fit the same forks and bars (with appropriate variances for
    diameters again), or do I need to be on the lookout for gotchas?

    Pat
     
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  2. landotter

    landotter Guest

    Pat Lamb wrote:
    > I'm looking for a new ride, and Cannondale is one brand I've been
    > looking at. I'm a bit curious, though, about their use of house-brand
    > components. For example, given a choice between Cannondale Wind hubs
    > and Shimano LX hubs, are there issues with the Cannondale hubs as far as
    > interoperability with "standard" clusters, freehub bodies, and spokes?
    > How do the bearings and seals compare?
    >


    Shouldn't be a big deal, cassettes should slide on as well as on a
    Shimano labled unit.

    It's likely a hub made by "KK" or similar Taiwanese brand--most are
    quite decent. Repack after the first year of use with some really nice
    bearings and grease if it worries ya.

    I've ridden a couple wheelsets with the cheap "Sora" hubs a few
    thousand miles, and you know what--they're just fine. There is no such
    thing as a perfectly sealed bearing, and regular cup and cone
    construction is twenty minutes to service. Do it once or twice a year,
    no matter how high falutin' your hubs are, and stop worrying and love
    the bomb.


    > Is there anything similar to look out for with seatposts or stems?


    Again, a lot of manufacturers use a "generic" or lesser known Asian
    brand of these to save bucks, and most are quite decent. Heck, my new
    ride came with a generic post that's got 2 bolts instead of one. No
    name brand, but it's better than most name brand posts I've seen


    >Is a seatpost a seatpost, as long as it's the right diameter?


    For the most part. Some are indeed stronger, something to think about
    if you're a clyde, and some have two bolts securing the saddle instead
    of one, which some folks prefer. Some posts are a bit lighter and some
    are longer, but for the most part, it's something to not worry about.

    > Do all stems
    > have to fit the same forks and bars (with appropriate variances for
    > diameters again), or do I need to be on the lookout for gotchas?


    Pretty much all threadless stems fit all threadless forks. Only
    difference that's common is bar diameter. Road is usually 26mm, mtb is
    25.4.

    Relax. :p
     
  3. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    A few year ago I bought a T800 tourer from Cannondale. It came with
    Coda hubs and cranksets. The parts were adequate but the wheel build
    wasn't good. I didn't like the Coda components as I don't think that
    they were made very well. Because of my experience, I'd be a little
    leery of no-name components that may come with a C'dale. Their frames
    are a different matter. I really like them.
     
  4. catzz66

    catzz66 Guest

    Pat Lamb wrote:
    > I'm looking for a new ride, and Cannondale is one brand I've been
    > looking at. I'm a bit curious, though, about their use of house-brand
    > components. For example, given a choice between Cannondale Wind hubs
    > and Shimano LX hubs, are there issues with the Cannondale hubs as far as
    > interoperability with "standard" clusters, freehub bodies, and spokes?
    > How do the bearings and seals compare?
    >
    > Is there anything similar to look out for with seatposts or stems? Is a
    > seatpost a seatpost, as long as it's the right diameter? Do all stems
    > have to fit the same forks and bars (with appropriate variances for
    > diameters again), or do I need to be on the lookout for gotchas?
    >
    > Pat
    >


    I tried out a Cannondale and priced them when I was in the market for a
    bike late last summer. Locally, they seemed to be priced above what a
    similarly equipped Specialized bike could be bought. Is this generally
    true? I liked what I rode, an R1000, but wound up with the other brand.
     
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