Cannondale Lefty

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bhubb, Oct 21, 2003.

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  1. Bhubb

    Bhubb Guest

    Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't be
    done. Any ideas?? Thanks.
     
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  2. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    [email protected] (bhubb) wrote:

    > Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't be
    > done. Any ideas?? Thanks.

    Try another dealer, one with a little more imagination.

    I may be necessary to fiddle about with zip ties and spacers, but I have no doubt that it can be
    done. No bike or trike has defeated me yet.

    --
    Ted Bennett Portland OR
     
  3. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    [email protected] (bhubb) writes:

    > Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't be
    > done. Any ideas?? Thanks.

    Yes, I've done it. I'll take photos later this morning and post them.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; not so much a regugee from reality, more a bogus ;; asylum seeker
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> writes:

    > [email protected] (bhubb) writes:
    >
    > > Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't be
    > > done. Any ideas?? Thanks.
    >
    > Yes, I've done it. I'll take photos later this morning and post them.

    OK, here we go.

    <URL: http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/tmp/lefty_cateye.JPG >

    I have to say that I at first thought it was impossible too. I used a Cateye Cordless 2 model
    CC-CL200N. You can probably do the same with other computers but this one I know works. I would not
    try it with a wired one because leading the wire up the leg is going to give additional
    difficulties.

    Note the section of ballpoint pen used as an extender to get the pickup closer to the spokes.
    While the use of a ballpoint pen isn't mandatory, you're going to need some extender, and also a
    longer bolt.

    The zip-ties are an issue. As you will know it's important to push up the boot and allow the lefty
    to dry out after a really wet muddy ride, otherwise you'll knacker the roller bearings. It's for
    this reason that I'm using two zip ties - so that I don't have to disturb the pickup every time I
    push the boot up.

    This setup has looks very vulnerable but in fact it's stood up to a great deal without giving any
    trouble, both on extremely bumpy rocky descents and cycling through high heather and bracken. The
    fact that the pickup is mostly between the leg and the wheel helps in this respect.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; not so much a regugee from reality, more a bogus ;; asylum seeker
     
  5. Bruni

    Bruni Guest

    Cadence types use rear stays. Tom

    --
    Bruni Bicycles "Where art meets science" brunibicycles.com
    410.426.3420 Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > > [email protected] (bhubb) writes:
    > >
    > > > Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't
    > > > be done. Any ideas?? Thanks.
    > >
    > > Yes, I've done it. I'll take photos later this morning and post them.
    >
    > OK, here we go.
    >
    > <URL: http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/tmp/lefty_cateye.JPG >
    >
    > I have to say that I at first thought it was impossible too. I used a Cateye Cordless 2 model
    > CC-CL200N. You can probably do the same with other computers but this one I know works. I would
    > not try it with a wired one because leading the wire up the leg is going to give additional
    > difficulties.
    >
    > Note the section of ballpoint pen used as an extender to get the pickup closer to the spokes.
    > While the use of a ballpoint pen isn't mandatory, you're going to need some extender, and also a
    > longer bolt.
    >
    > The zip-ties are an issue. As you will know it's important to push up the boot and allow the lefty
    > to dry out after a really wet muddy ride, otherwise you'll knacker the roller bearings. It's for
    > this reason that I'm using two zip ties - so that I don't have to disturb the pickup every time I
    > push the boot up.
    >
    > This setup has looks very vulnerable but in fact it's stood up to a great deal without giving any
    > trouble, both on extremely bumpy rocky descents and cycling through high heather and bracken. The
    > fact that the pickup is mostly between the leg and the wheel helps in this respect.
    >
    > --
    > [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > ;; not so much a regugee from reality, more a bogus ;; asylum seeker
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 20 Oct 2003 20:18:35 -0700, [email protected] (bhubb) may have said:

    >Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't be
    >done. Any ideas?? Thanks.

    Baloney. I've seen it done. In the only one I saw up close, a piece of wood was whittled to fit
    the lefty's tube just above the brake caliper and put the sensor switch at the right distance from
    the spokes, and the whole thing was tie-wrapped in place. I asked the bike's rider why he hadn't
    just mounted the switch to the back of the caliper, and he said that he was worried that it might
    get too hot.

    I think that your bike shop's people might have been more honest if they had said "it can't be done
    with just what comes in a comp's installation kit, and we're not interested in fabricating special
    hand-made brackets or spacers to get it to work." I can understand not wanting to do stuff that
    isn't straighforward assembly, but saying that something is flatly impossible shows a certain
    rigidity that I find repugnant.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  7. Have you thought of getting a computer that reads from the rear wheel? No conflicts with the exotic
    fork and more acurate, too, as the rear tracks straighter than the front.

    Just a thought.

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"

    See you on the road. Chris Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  8. John Reilly

    John Reilly Guest

    Cannondale Tech Support recommended to mount the magnet on the brake disc (they even sent a
    picture). Took some time to find one skinny enough, but it worked. Think I finally used a
    Cateye magnet.
    - John

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Have you thought of getting a computer that reads from the rear wheel? No conflicts with the
    > exotic fork and more acurate, too, as the rear tracks straighter than the front.
    >
    > Just a thought.
    >
    > "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"
    >
    > See you on the road. Chris Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  9. bhubb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty?

    In extremis, is there any chance of mounting it on the rear wheel?
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> writes:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > [email protected] (Adam Rush) wrote:
    > >
    > > >[email protected] (bhubb) wrote in message
    > > >news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >> Anybody have any luck installing a cyclometer on a Cannondale Lefty? My dealer says it can't
    > > >> be done. Any ideas?? Thanks.
    > > >
    > > >I've finally gotten to looking at what this "Lefty" is, and I must say: You are a sick,
    > > >sick man.
    > > >
    > > >Can anybody tell me what's the idea behind this abomination?
    > >
    > > Marketing mainly. There may be a couple minor advantages (though I have serious doubts...) to
    > > offset the hassles (removing the front wheel).
    >
    > Well, removing the wheel isn't toolless, IIRC,

    It isn't. You need 1 (one) allen key. You have to remove two bolts (lower brake caliper, axle) and
    loosen a third (upper brake caliper).

    > but on the other hand, you don't have to remove the wheel to change tires and tubes! And really,
    > why else do you remove a wheel on the trail?

    Just so.

    In fact the question could reasonably be posed the other way: what on earth is the point of having
    two fork blades? Mike Burrows, for example, is a great exponent of monoblades, and has used them on
    everything from record breaking track bikes to freight carrying work bikes.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    The trouble with Simon is that he only opens his mouth to change feet. ;; of me, by
    a 'friend'
     
  11. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    [email protected] (Gary Young) writes:

    > In his book on bicycle design, Mike Burrows promotes the monostay design for commuter bikes and
    > other utility uses, primarily because of the ease of fixing a flat tire (if I remember correctly).
    > I'm not sure how he fits hub gears or regular cassette hubs in the rear, though.

    Like this: <URL: http://www.windcheetah.co.uk/HIGHREZ/bob.jpg >

    Note that the cassette is on the opposite side of the stay to the wheel.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    The trouble with Simon is that he only opens his mouth to change feet. ;; of me, by
    a 'friend'
     
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