Carbon Clinchers vs Carbon Tubular Wheels.......any thoughts...Pro's or Con's?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by tobin7, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. tobin7

    tobin7 New Member

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    I am in the process of buying some new carbon wheels for my bike. I have a Specialized Allez Sport 54cm that I am going to have set up for Tri's. I am going to get carbon wheels for it, bullhorn carbon handlebar, sram carbon shifters and sram carbon reverse brake levers. This will be used for both Tri's and Road cycling. I am looking at getting 80 mm rims. I was looking at the SRAM S80s, but wanted some input on Clincher vs Tubular. Any and all feedback is appreciated. THANK YOU!
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I think you'll find that there are very few people satisfied with SRAM deep section wheels. Clincher vs. tubular is mostly a religious debate, with a couple exceptions. It is true that if a tubular goes flat you "may" retain more control than if a clincher goes flat. Note the "may". Riding flats on either type rim may result in damage to the rim if that rim is CF. I don 't know how many steep and twisty descents there are in tri's, but flatting with either type rim on a descent will result in the odds of your crashing going up greatly. CF clinchers will be tend to maintain braking heat in the rim longer and at higher temps than alloy clinchers. This is a problem only on descents where incorrect braking technique can result in tire bead failure in some CF clinchers on descents. CF tubulars are less sensitive to this but can still suffer heat related problems on descents. In the rain, alloy clinchers will tend to brake better than either CF tubulars or clinchers. CF tubulars have no real benefit over CF clinchers in the wet.; Tubulars of course require being glued to the rim, and good gluing technique is essential to make sure the tire stays on the rim. It's not hard to do it correctly, but some folks aren't interested in doing the whole gluing process. If you get a flat with a tubie, you may have to install a pre-glued spare out on the road, which means carrying a pre-glued spare. Pre-glued spares take up much more room than inner tubes for clinchers. Some riders, however, get away with either riding with anti-flat liquids in their tubies or putting that liquid in after a flat occurs. Tubulars do not necessarily have lower rolling resistance and do not necessarily ride better or corner better. It all depends on the tire. Clinchers are more convenient, but for some riders convenience isn't everything. So, the answer to all your questions is essentially, "It depends."
     
  3. jaretj

    jaretj New Member

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    Some good advise from alienator above.

    Personally I would bypass SRAM and look at HED and Zipp for race wheels. Spend the money now, buy them once and you'll be using them for many years.

    As for Tubular/Clincher, my personal preference is Clincher since the technology has gotten so much better in the past few years but that is a religious debate like alienator says.
     
  4. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    The internet is full of not so good reviews on SRAM wheels, I would avoid them until that changes.
     
  5. 1sandspurpres

    1sandspurpres New Member

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    I was in the same boat, and decided to go with the ZIPP 808 on the rear and the 404 front. Decided on using the carbon clinchers. Only down side to it, you have to change out the brake pads. Using the stock or aluminum rims, the brake pads that are on those, you can't use on the carbon rims.
    The ZIPPS are so fast and smooth. Is there a bit shop where you can test ride them near you ? I've heard so many discussions on which you would want. But just read up on them.
     
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