Carbon Fiber Frame



I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
rack?
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
[email protected] ??? wrote:
> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> rack?


Yes.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
The weather is here, wish you were beautiful
 
C

Clive George

Guest
"Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> [email protected] ??? wrote:
>> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
>> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
>> rack?

>
> Yes.


Nice :) Concise, accurate and completely unhelpful :)

To the OP - it'll be fine. Take care to not do things like replacing the
rack bars with saw blades, or tying the bike to it with glass-coated kite
string.

(ie make sure there's nothing to rub on the frame and damage it, make sure
it's not going to fall off. Pipe lagging might do you well as a suitable
protection material, either on the rack or the bike.)

cheers,
clive
 
J

Joel Mayes

Guest
On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> rack?


I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

Cheers

Joel
--
Human Powered Cycles | High quality servicing and repairs
[email protected] | Affordable second hand bikes
(03) 9029 6504 |
www.humanpowered.com.au | CPF and RTCA Member
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> rack?


It's going to depend upon the rack and how it interfaces to the frame, as
well as the design of the frame itself. You don't want the bike moving
around on the rack, so you're generally best off if one of the two arms from
the rack can fit in the rear triangle of the frame (above the rear wheel and
behind the seat tube).

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
2,298
288
83
52
Joel Mayes said:
On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> rack?


I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks" (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular) padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond what's structurally required.
 
J

John Forrest Tomlinson

Guest
On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 05:03:37 -0000, "Clive George"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>"Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> [email protected] ??? wrote:
>>> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
>>> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
>>> rack?

>>
>> Yes.

>
>Nice :) Concise, accurate and completely unhelpful :)
>
>To the OP - it'll be fine. Take care to not do things like replacing the
>rack bars with saw blades, or tying the bike to it with glass-coated kite
>string.


Also backing the car into a wall could be problem.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
John Forrest Tomlinson wrote:
> On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 05:03:37 -0000, "Clive George"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> [email protected] ??? wrote:
>>>> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
>>>> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
>>>> rack?
>>> Yes.

>> Nice :) Concise, accurate and completely unhelpful :)
>>
>> To the OP - it'll be fine. Take care to not do things like replacing the
>> rack bars with saw blades, or tying the bike to it with glass-coated kite
>> string.

>
> Also backing the car into a wall could be problem.
>

While the above would be damaging, is not running into low clearance
overhangs with bicycles on roof racks more common? A RBT regular reports
his customers do the latter with distressing frequency.

Getting rear ended in traffic with a bicycle on a trunk rack is a
concern - urban areas in rush hour would be best avoided.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
The weather is here, wish you were beautiful
 
On Feb 16, 2:09 am, dabac <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> Joel Mayes Wrote:
>
> > On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> > > possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> > > rack?

>
> > I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
> > frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
> > weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

>
> But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks"
> (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular)
> padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the
> top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible
> strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if
> the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much
> trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond
> what's structurally required.
>
> --
> dabac


The particular rack is a Saris trunk rack.

http://www.saris.com/p-299-bones-3-bike.aspx

I may cut a few squares of cloth from a towel for added protection or
something like that.

Ultimately, I'll probably get a roof rack so I can sleep at nights.
My new bike is worth more than my car, which shows I have my
priorities in order.
 
B

Bruce Gilbert

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Feb 16, 2:09 am, dabac <[email protected]
> mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> > Joel Mayes Wrote:
> >
> > > On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > > I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> > > > possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> > > > rack?

> >
> > > I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
> > > frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
> > > weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

> >
> > But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks"
> > (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular)
> > padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the
> > top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible
> > strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if
> > the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much
> > trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond
> > what's structurally required.
> >
> > --
> > dabac

>
> The particular rack is a Saris trunk rack.
>
> http://www.saris.com/p-299-bones-3-bike.aspx
>
> I may cut a few squares of cloth from a towel for added protection or
> something like that.
>
> Ultimately, I'll probably get a roof rack so I can sleep at nights.
> My new bike is worth more than my car, which shows I have my
> priorities in order.


Great thinking until you drive into the garage before taking the bike(s)
off. Been there, done that, cried for a week...

Bruce
 
On Feb 16, 2:07 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...
>
> > I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> > possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> > rack?

>
> It's going to depend upon the rack and how it interfaces to the frame, as
> well as the design of the frame itself. You don't want the bike moving
> around on the rack, so you're generally best off if one of the two arms from
> the rack can fit in the rear triangle of the frame (above the rear wheel and
> behind the seat tube).
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


I have seen the site for Chain Reaction Bicycles before. Great web
page with descriptions of many nice local rides.

I go to Monterey occasionally, perhaps I'll drop by the next time I'm
in the area.
 
C

Colin Campbell

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> On Feb 16, 2:09 am, dabac <[email protected]
> mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
>> Joel Mayes Wrote:
>>
>>> On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
>>>> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
>>>> rack?
>>> I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
>>> frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
>>> weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

>> But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks"
>> (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular)
>> padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the
>> top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible
>> strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if
>> the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much
>> trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond
>> what's structurally required.
>>
>> --
>> dabac

>
> The particular rack is a Saris trunk rack.
>
> http://www.saris.com/p-299-bones-3-bike.aspx
>
> I may cut a few squares of cloth from a towel for added protection or
> something like that.
>
> Ultimately, I'll probably get a roof rack so I can sleep at nights.
> My new bike is worth more than my car, which shows I have my
> priorities in order.


What do you drive? I much prefer to put my bikes in the trunk of my
car, even if that does take a couple of extra minutes.

A couple I ride with has figured out how to carry both their bikes in
the trunk of their Honda Accord coupe. My car has folding rear seats,
so I believe I _could_ carry two bikes if I needed to.

On the other hand, I have a friend who is absolutely horrified by the
prospect of removing the wheels from his bike, sp even though he has a
nice sized car, he always borrows his wife's SUV when he wants to carry
his bike somplace, and generally mounts a trailer hitch rack and carries
the bike outside the vehicle. Recently, his riding buddies have been
ragging on him for doing this, so he occasionally now removes the front
wheel only and sticks the bike in the back of the SUV.

Last weekend, three of us drove to a century ride. I was the lucky one
to get to store his bike inside the SUV. Their bikes were outside,
exposed to whatever might befall them (nothing did).
 
P

Paul Cassel

Guest
Colin Campbell wrote:

>
> On the other hand, I have a friend who is absolutely horrified by the
> prospect of removing the wheels from his bike,


How does he fix a flat?
 
C

Colin Campbell

Guest
Paul Cassel wrote:
> Colin Campbell wrote:
>
>>
>> On the other hand, I have a friend who is absolutely horrified by the
>> prospect of removing the wheels from his bike,

>
> How does he fix a flat?


So far, he hasn't flatted when I've ridden with him. My guess is that
he rides home on the rim and replaces the entire bike. (just kidding)
 
On Feb 16, 4:03 pm, Colin Campbell <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > On Feb 16, 2:09 am, dabac <[email protected]
> > mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> >> Joel Mayes Wrote:

>
> >>> On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>>> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> >>>> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> >>>> rack?
> >>> I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
> >>> frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
> >>> weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.
> >> But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks"
> >> (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular)
> >> padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the
> >> top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible
> >> strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if
> >> the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much
> >> trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond
> >> what's structurally required.

>
> >> --
> >> dabac

>
> > The particular rack is a Saris trunk rack.

>
> >http://www.saris.com/p-299-bones-3-bike.aspx

>
> > I may cut a few squares of cloth from a towel for added protection or
> > something like that.

>
> > Ultimately, I'll probably get a roof rack so I can sleep at nights.
> > My new bike is worth more than my car, which shows I have my
> > priorities in order.

>
> What do you drive? I much prefer to put my bikes in the trunk of my
> car, even if that does take a couple of extra minutes.
>
> A couple I ride with has figured out how to carry both their bikes in
> the trunk of their Honda Accord coupe. My car has folding rear seats,
> so I believe I _could_ carry two bikes if I needed to.
>
> On the other hand, I have a friend who is absolutely horrified by the
> prospect of removing the wheels from his bike, sp even though he has a
> nice sized car, he always borrows his wife's SUV when he wants to carry
> his bike somplace, and generally mounts a trailer hitch rack and carries
> the bike outside the vehicle. Recently, his riding buddies have been
> ragging on him for doing this, so he occasionally now removes the front
> wheel only and sticks the bike in the back of the SUV.
>
> Last weekend, three of us drove to a century ride. I was the lucky one
> to get to store his bike inside the SUV. Their bikes were outside,
> exposed to whatever might befall them (nothing did).


I have a '97 Dodge Intrepid. It's a big car as they go now-a-days.
The trunk is large, but the back seats don't fold down.

I wouldn't mind removing the front wheel, but taking off the back is
more work than I want to do. I can put my mountain bike in the back
seat by taking off the front wheel and the seat/post. That may be an
option for the new bike, although I have a feeling that once I get the
seat adjusted properly, I'm going to want to leave it as is.

I like the SUV option, although my next car may be a Cooper Mini.
Doubt I'll be putting any bikes in there!
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
2,298
288
83
52
On Feb 16, 2:09 am, dabac <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> Joel Mayes Wrote:
>
> > On 2008-02-16, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> > > possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> > > rack?

>
> > I wouldn't do this myself. Particularly after chatting with my local
> > frame repairer last week. He's seen over twenty frames (CF and light
> > weight alloy) since xmas with top tubes damaged by such racks.

>
> But not all racks are created equal. Some have rather narrow "forks"
> (1/2" or so) that carry the bikes, some have thick (but circular)
> padding and there's even one model that's got concave cutouts for the
> top tube to rest in. Something like the last two coupled with a sensible
> strap down tension really shouldn't pose a risk for the frame. But if
> the OP feels that this is still a concern it shouldn't be too much
> trouble to improvise some padding to distribute the load way beyond
> what's structurally required.
>
> --
> dabac


The particular rack is a Saris trunk rack.

http://www.saris.com/p-299-bones-3-bike.aspx

I may cut a few squares of cloth from a towel for added protection or
something like that.

Ultimately, I'll probably get a roof rack so I can sleep at nights.
My new bike is worth more than my car, which shows I have my
priorities in order.

That rack looks like it has some nice cradles for the frame to rest in. I'd be far more worried about random traffic/handling incidents than for anything happening by simply carrying the bike. But if you'd like a belt-and-braces approach you could look for some stiff plastic (maybe cut from a PET bottle or so) and use that plastic to shape sleeves to go around the frame where the rack attaches to distribute the load even further.
It's been mentioned already, but roof rack damage seems to be a far more common incident than trunk rack damage, so you might want to reconsider that.
 
E

ernestolube.com

Guest
On Feb 15, 10:44 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> I'm getting a nice new bike with a carbon fiber frame. Is there any
> possibility of damaging the frame by carrying it on a trunk mounted
> rack?


Saris or Thule have been good luck for me when I had a Trek 5200. Just
make sure if you're also carrying another bike, to at least put a sock
on the pedal closest to your frame for protection.