Carbon fork and lawyer tabs (remove?)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jjpsych, Aug 6, 2003.

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  1. Jjpsych

    Jjpsych Guest

    HI, I just got a new fork for a bike. Carbon baldes and droupouts. The dropouts hat those stinking
    lawyer tabs!!! How can I remove these? Can I sand/file them, even though they are carbon fiber?
    Thanks in advance,

    Jay Jimerson
     
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  2. Mack Mad

    Mack Mad Guest

    "jjpsych" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > HI, I just got a new fork for a bike. Carbon baldes and droupouts. The dropouts hat those stinking
    > lawyer tabs!!! How can I remove these? Can I sand/file them, even though they are carbon fiber?
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Jay Jimerson

    I highly doubt that the dropouts and tabs are carbon fiber. Most forks use aluminum dropouts.
    Assuming they are truly aluminum you can file them down. You could also use sandpaper, but that
    might take a bit more time.

    Of course you didn't hear that from me - I don't need a call from your lawyer.
     
  3. Andresmuro

    Andresmuro Guest

    file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.

    Andres
     
  4. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "jjpsych" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > HI, I just got a new fork for a bike. Carbon baldes and droupouts. The dropouts hat those stinking
    > lawyer tabs!!! How can I remove these? Can I sand/file them, even though they are carbon fiber?
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Jay Jimerson

    two words: bench grinder

    Mike
     
  5. > file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.

    But he's saying that his fork ends are carbon fiber, not aluminum. Sounds unlikely but, if true, I
    wouldn't feel too comfortable filing them down, for fear of the carbon fraying.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. B wrote:
    >
    > >file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.
    >
    > filing produces heat. Heat can break the bond of the droupouts and the carbon fiber. This is why I
    > have reulctant to file mine. B
    )

    It is unusual in current manufacture to use beeswax ;)

    --
    Marten
     
  7. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

  8. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.
    >
    > filing produces heat. Heat can break the bond of the droupouts and the
    carbon
    > fiber. This is why I have reulctant to file mine. B
    >

    Do you mean to suggest, on this technical newsgroup, that filing off lawer's lips will produce
    enough heat to damage the bond between dropout and fork blade?

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  9. jimerson-<< I just got a new fork for a bike. Carbon baldes and droupouts. The dropouts hat those
    stinking lawyer tabs!!! How can I remove these? Can I sand/file them, even though they are carbon
    fiber? >><BR><BR>

    Carbon fiber dropouts? well, ya can just file them down, but will probably void your warranty, even
    for other problems. I say keep them unless they prevent you from putting the wheel in...they really
    are no big deal.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. Jjpsych

    Jjpsych Guest

    Actually, they are carbon....not aluminum (else i would have filed them off). The fork is a GT
    "Edge" model, and it appears that the blades and droupouts are a monocoque (or however you spell it)
    construction. My question is can I sand down these "lawyer lips" without compromising the structural
    integrity of the fork? (i.e. causing the fiber to fray or crack) thanks, Jay

    > I highly doubt that the dropouts and tabs are carbon fiber. Most forks use aluminum dropouts.
    > Assuming they are truly aluminum you can file them down. You could also use sandpaper, but that
    > might take a bit more time.
    >
    > Of course you didn't hear that from me - I don't need a call from your lawyer.
     
  11. Richard Ney

    Richard Ney Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky writes:

    >> file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.
    >
    > But he's saying that his fork ends are carbon fiber, not aluminum. Sounds unlikely but, if true, I
    > wouldn't feel too comfortable filing them down, for fear of the carbon fraying.
    >
    I have a new Trek 2300 with tabs on the fork.

    Would filing off the tabs void the warranty?
     
  12. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    jjpsych wrote:

    > Actually, they [dropouts] are carbon....not aluminum

    Does anyone else out there think that composite is a dumb material choice for dropouts?
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  13. "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.
    >
    > But he's saying that his fork ends are carbon fiber, not aluminum. Sounds unlikely but, if true, I
    > wouldn't feel too comfortable filing them down, for fear of the carbon fraying.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    It certainly does sound like he's saying carbon fiber dropouts. Gulp.

    I hate lawyer lips, and do remove them from my bikes, but working with plastic drop outs would worry
    me. If the fork maker made these plastic drop outs well, he carefully selected the matrix (plastic
    stuff that bonds the carbon fibers)to withstand the repeated crushing delivered by the qr mechanism.
    Sanding the lips off is no big deal, but what to do with the unfinished areas left behind is. One
    would want to seal them with several coats of epoxy to prevent water from wicking inside, but
    finding the right epoxy - one that can withstand the repeated crushing - would take work (yes, I
    assume there will be some overlap into the qr grip area.) The common, hardware store epoxy glues can
    be thinned with alcohol and painted on, but they tend to be brittle. So, I'd leave the lips on. If I
    fell out of love with the fork and wanted to play with it...perhaps then.

    Steve Shapiro [email protected]
     
  14. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    B wrote:
    >>file them down at your own risk. I do that to all my bikes.
    >
    >
    > filing produces heat. Heat can break the bond of the droupouts and the carbon fiber. This is why I
    > have reulctant to file mine. B
    >
    > (remove clothes to reply)

    You need to file pretty fast to generate enough heat to do anything to the fork that a hot summer
    day on asphalt won't do. And, I'm not even sure that carbon fibre's hard enough to generate much
    heat even if you file fast.

    But, if they're carbon fibre, I wouldn't risk it. You can't get as much grab with the skewer because
    the fibers will compress so it's more likely to slip a bit -- and I sure wouldn't want it to slip
    when I was riding it :). I'd either put up with the slight inconvenience when I remove my front
    wheel or I'd get a stronger fork :).

    David
     
  15. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "Terry Morse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > jjpsych wrote:
    >
    > > Actually, they [dropouts] are carbon....not aluminum
    >
    > Does anyone else out there think that composite is a dumb material choice for dropouts?

    Me, for one - but I'm still not convinced that they aren't aluminum. Cervelo went to some extremes
    to lighten up their Wolf fork, but even it has C-shaped inserts in the otherwise all-carbon dropouts
    that the skewer clamps upon.

    Andy Coggan
     
  16. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 02:57:45 GMT, Mack Mad <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I highly doubt that the dropouts and tabs are carbon fiber. Most forks use aluminum dropouts.
    > Assuming they are truly aluminum you can file them

    The dropouts on my stock 2001 Giant TCR2's CF fork are CF. Besides the fact that I don't see a
    joint, the paint is chipped at the dropout and it sure looks like CF underneath.

    No lawyer tabs on it, though. I can't say as I'm sure I know what they are -- some sort of bit that
    makes it hard to remove the wheel just by releasing the QR?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  17. Marcus Coles

    Marcus Coles Guest

    jjpsych wrote:
    > Actually, they are carbon....not aluminum (else i would have filed them off). The fork is a GT
    > "Edge" model, and it appears that the blades and droupouts are a monocoque (or however you spell
    > it) construction. My question is can I sand down these "lawyer lips" without compromising the
    > structural integrity of the fork? (i.e. causing the fiber to fray or crack) thanks, Jay
    >
    >
    >

    An alternative, probably dangerous _don't do it._

    Forget the plastic surgery.

    Get implants!

    Take or make Aluminum washers the same thickness as the solicitor's labia.

    Cut a slot to match the drop out making the washer into a "C" shape.

    Glue the suckers in place.

    Adjust quicker releases to match the new fatter droop outs.

    Use no disc brakes with this mod, stay off the yumps.

    Not responsible etc.....etc......

    Marcus
     
  18. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    [email protected] (jjpsych) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > HI, I just got a new fork for a bike. Carbon baldes and droupouts. The dropouts hat those stinking
    > lawyer tabs!!! How can I remove these? Can I sand/file them, even though they are carbon fiber?
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Jay Jimerson

    Sure. As anyone whose cut a carbon steerer can tell you, you can just use a file or very coarse
    sand paper.

    Consider wetting the fork every minute or so to trap the dust so you don't breathe it (it's
    irritating!).

    Don't use a bench grinder; it may heat the epoxy too much. Too hot to touch? Too hot for the epoxy.

    Some will say the exposed fibers will absorb water, but exposed fibers have been fine in my
    experience.

    Don't sue me :)
     
  19. Bill K.

    Bill K. Guest

    I've have a carbon drop out fork also (1999 TCR "Team") I left my tabs on because the carbon tips
    aren't as solid as aluminum dropouts. I didn't want to crush the tips, so I can't crank down on them
    as much as I would like.
     
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