Carbon forks and aheadset



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Garyb

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Hi folks, I'm new as far as this ng is concerned and I'm returning to cycling after a break of 4
years. One thing I've noticed since my comeback is that almost everyone appears to have switched to
carbon forks and the 'aheadset' design of stem. I'm going to restore my columbus max frameset over
the winter months and i was toying with the idea of switching to carbon forks. The main reason is
that the max forks are really unforgiving and after a couple of hours are pretty uncomfortable.

I like like the look and price of the itm snyper forks, anyone had any experience with them? I
remember reading several years ago that carbon forks are prone to breaking around the crown without
warning and aheadset stems flex more than quill equivalents, any comments on this?

I'm 15 stone at the moment (my old racing weightwas 12 1/2 stone) so I'm not a small rider
unfortunately so would this be too much strain for the average carbon fork?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Cheers, Gary.

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GaryB <gary.bartram(removethis)@lineone.net> wrote:
: was toying with the idea of switching to carbon forks. The main reason is that the max forks are
: really unforgiving and after a couple of hours are pretty uncomfortable.

Can do, but I wouldn't expect a huge amount of difference.

: I remember reading several years ago that carbon forks are prone to breaking around the crown
: without warning and aheadset stems flex more than quill equivalents, any comments on this?

The former problem is solved now. As for the latter, new ahead stems are less flexible than
quill stems.

: I'm 15 stone at the moment (my old racing weightwas 12 1/2 stone) so I'm not a small rider
: unfortunately so would this be too much strain for the average carbon fork?

No. THough if I were you I'd avoid the very lightest models.

Arthur

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GaryB wrote:
> Hi folks, I'm new as far as this ng is concerned and I'm returning to cycling after a break of 4
> years. One thing I've noticed since my comeback is that almost everyone appears to have switched
> to carbon forks and the 'aheadset' design of stem. I'm going to restore my columbus max frameset
> over the winter months and i was toying with the idea of switching to carbon forks. The main
> reason is that the max forks are really unforgiving and after a couple of hours are pretty
> uncomfortable.

Carbon forks do have a damping effect but the tyres still make far more difference.

> I like like the look and price of the itm snyper forks, anyone had any experience with them?

Yes, I've got those. I reckon they're good value for money and are probably stronger than some of
the more lightweight forks around. I can't personally directly compare them to other makes & models,
though, because they're my first carbons.

> I remember reading several years ago that carbon forks are prone to breaking around the crown
> without warning

I think that's less likely with forks with aluminium crowns - which the Snyper has - and also
probably only a very rare problem with the latest quality all-carbon forks.

> and aheadset stems flex more than quill equivalents

I believe it's the other way around. The diameter of the stem is larger and it clamps to the
/outside/ of the steerer - so the stem itself must be stiffer, and so much so that it makes up for
any extra flex from the longer steerer.

> I'm 15 stone at the moment (my old racing weightwas 12 1/2 stone) so I'm not a small rider
> unfortunately so would this be too much strain for the average carbon fork?

1" all carbon (ie. with 1" carbon steerer tube and crown as well as blades) would probably be
unwise. 1 1/8" (if your head tube takes that size) all carbon might be ok (?). I've read convincing
arguments that heavier than average riders should opt for cromo steel steerers - more reliable in
general and flex less under braking. You can get carbon forks with these. ...I don't know whether 15
stone qualifies.

Note. ITM seems to have renamed the Synper range to Spider - and also have other models that seem to
have the same or very similar specifications - but there will still be some Synpers on the market.
Maybe they thought the name was distasteful after the recent incidents in the States (despite the
funny spelling)? ...The forks even have a gun sight logo on them! :)

~PB
 
Thanks for your replies and help:

"Pete Biggs"
>
>
> > I like like the look and price of the itm snyper forks, anyone had any experience with them?
>
> Yes, I've got those. I reckon they're good value for money and are probably stronger than some of
> the more lightweight forks around. I can't personally directly compare them to other makes &
> models, though, because they're my first carbons.

Thanks, they sound like they'll do for me :)

> > I'm 15 stone at the moment (my old racing weightwas 12 1/2 stone) so I'm not a small rider
> > unfortunately so would this be too much strain for the average carbon fork?
>
> 1" all carbon (ie. with 1" carbon steerer tube and crown as well as blades) would probably be
> unwise. 1 1/8" (if your head tube takes that size) all carbon might be ok (?). I've read
> convincing arguments that heavier than average riders should opt for cromo steel steerers - more
> reliable in general and flex less under braking. You can get carbon forks with these. ...I don't
> know whether 15 stone qualifies.

My frame takes 1" so I was already convinced that all carbon was a bit risky with my
current mass :)

I've not come across any with cromo steerers yet but I think the ITM spider/snypers will do the
trick. Another reason for changing the fork was so that i could use a 90 deg ahead stem to raise
the front end position a little. The frame's an excellent handler and very stiff, I'd love to give
it a new lease of life.

cheers, Gary.

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