Carbon rear triangle? Carbon rear seat stay? Should I care?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Craig, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Craig

    Craig Guest

    I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months and
    every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim that
    this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride! Reducing
    road vibration, smoothing out the bumps, etc. What gives??? Any truth in
    advertising or is this all the more to sell a few more frames?

    I remember an article that Sheldon Brown wrote back around the turn of the
    century (no not circa 1900, although Sheldon may own a few bikes that old,
    circa 2001.) debunking frame material legend and myth.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
    Tags:


  2. John Rees

    John Rees Guest

    "Craig" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    | I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months
    and
    | every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere
    or
    | another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim
    that
    | this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride!
    Reducing
    | road vibration, smoothing out the bumps, etc. What gives??? Any
    truth in
    | advertising or is this all the more to sell a few more frames?

    Many will agree that the most important issue is that the bike fits you.
    Then come other things like good wheels, components and whether it's a
    colour you like. At the bottom of the list is frame material. Because
    if you aren't sure of the difference, you will likely not notice a
    difference between any of them.

    All- aluminium seems to be the cheapest way to make a bike frame, and
    very good aluminium ones can still be found. Saving money here allows
    better stuff elsewhere, like in the wheels for exmaple.

    Whatever you do, stay away from Bamboo ! :)
     
  3. "Craig" wrote:
    > I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months and
    > every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    > another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim

    that
    > this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride!

    Reducing
    > road vibration, smoothing out the bumps, etc. What gives???


    That's been the fad for the last 1-2 years. Just another marketing ploy
    (like "S" shaped stays) to convince folks they need a new bike.

    Art "My SL frame turned 20 in May" Harris
     
  4. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    my experience of owning several different brands of carbon forks & seat
    posts is that they /do/ give a more comfortable ride. presumably carbon
    seat stays would be the same - i tested a giant tcr and it was almost
    freakily smooth on rough surfaces. personally however, if i were buying
    a mixed material frame, i'm not sure i'd want a frame with carbon chain
    stays - i want them stiff.

    would i spend a lot of extra cash for a frame with carbon stays?
    probably not. a carbon seat post works brilliantly and is a lot cheaper.

    Craig wrote:
    > I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months and
    > every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    > another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim that
    > this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride! Reducing
    > road vibration, smoothing out the bumps, etc. What gives??? Any truth in
    > advertising or is this all the more to sell a few more frames?
    >
    > I remember an article that Sheldon Brown wrote back around the turn of the
    > century (no not circa 1900, although Sheldon may own a few bikes that old,
    > circa 2001.) debunking frame material legend and myth.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  5. craig-<< I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months
    and
    every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim that
    this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride! >><BR><BR>

    The stuff of the marketing department, not the racing or riding department.

    MANY framesets out there that don't have carbon ends or plugs on them. Still
    many framesets in steel and some very economical frames in all carbon(Calfee
    Luna).

    Also Torelli.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. H. Morgan

    H. Morgan Guest

    On 24 Jul 2004 13:28:41 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
    Campagnolo ) wrote:

    >craig-<< I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months
    >and
    >every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    >another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim that
    >this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride! >><BR><BR>
    >
    >The stuff of the marketing department, not the racing or riding department.
    >
    >MANY framesets out there that don't have carbon ends or plugs on them. Still
    >many framesets in steel and some very economical frames in all carbon(Calfee
    >Luna).
    >
    >Also Torelli.
    >
    >Peter Chisholm
    >Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    >1833 Pearl St.
    >Boulder, CO, 80302
    >(303)440-3535
    >http://www.vecchios.com
    >"Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"




    A good frame is a good frame, whether built from steel, aluminum,
    titanium, carbon, or a mix. There are bad frames to be found made of
    every material. I am truly a fan of my 2 titanium frames, and I have
    carbon bits all over them. A heavier rider may find my bikes too
    flexible.
    There is no one answer to a question like this.
    My apologies, Peter, for replying to your post as if I am disputing
    your comments, I simply deleted the rest of the thread already.
     
  7. I have no opinion on whether carbon seatstays or chainstays or
    seatposts or stems or handlebars or cranks or rims or saddles or
    frames or forks make any difference to a bike's ride. But lots of
    people, including me, think carbon fiber on a bike looks cool. And
    that is mighty important for a bicycle. Its best if the bike's owner
    thinks the bike is cool and likes it. The bike is more likely to get
    ridden and the ride is likely to be more enjoyable.

    So the question to ask with regard to carbon is whether you like it.
    If you do then get a bike with carbon on it and enjoy the ride.


    "Craig" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've been looking around for a new road frame for the past few months and
    > every single frame seems to have some carbon thrown onto it somewhere or
    > another. Carbon seat stays, carbon chain stays. All the blurbs claim that
    > this wonderful bit of carbon will make the frame a dream to ride! Reducing
    > road vibration, smoothing out the bumps, etc. What gives??? Any truth in
    > advertising or is this all the more to sell a few more frames?
    >
    > I remember an article that Sheldon Brown wrote back around the turn of the
    > century (no not circa 1900, although Sheldon may own a few bikes that old,
    > circa 2001.) debunking frame material legend and myth.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
     
  8. ship-<< A good frame is a good frame, whether built from steel, aluminum,
    titanium, carbon, or a mix. There are bad frames to be found made of
    every material. >><BR><BR>

    BUT a decent frameset of aluminum, say, is not improved with a carbon butt end.
    Nor is ti or steel.
    That is marketing.

    ship-<< My apologies, Peter, for replying to your post as if I am disputing
    your comments, I simply deleted the rest of the thread already. >><BR><BR>

    No need to apologize!! This is a discussion group afterall.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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