carbon vs. aluminum

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Fly1296, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. thorneh

    thorneh New Member

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    Focus Cayo 2.0 is looking good. I have been waiting for mine to be delivered for months though- ordered in November and it is now February!
     


  2. jerr-man

    jerr-man New Member

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    Neither - go with Steel.
    I have a Pinarello Opera, purchased used on ebay, and am loving it.
    My "other" bike is a Coppi Genius Carbon, similarly sweet ride though not as stiff in the BB as the Pinarello.
     
  3. Fly1296

    Fly1296 New Member

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    Someday I'm going to have to just pick a bike, but today is not that day /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    I'm sure the CAAD10 is old news to many on this forum, but it's new to me. I just stumbled across it yesterday while browsing Cannondale's site, and it got my immediate attention. Every review I've found has been glowing, and the prospect of stepping up to Rival within an Apex budget is irresistable. I understand that this will be a firmer ride than the carbon Synapse I rode last week.

    Does anyone here have any experience with the CAAD10 at any build? I'm most interested in the ride impression.
     
  4. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    I do not have a CAAD10 but I do own a CAAD9 3. The CAAD is an awesome bike. The CAAD is very responsive and handles well. The design of the bike suggests that it is a racing machine. It is. A racing machine that you can ride all day long. You wont be disappointed take one out for a ride.
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    The part that you're chosing to ignore is really the most important part. Your back will care not what your frame is made of when you're riding down the road in pain and you'll suddenly care a little more when your suspect setup pitches too much weight on the front wheel when descending a steep hill.

    Geometry isn't just a casual "I fancy a bit of this today..." whimsical decision unless you ride in tight black jeans and paint your rims pastel shades of awful...

    Find your position and see what is available in your required size.

    The CAAD10 is a stellar bike, especially for the money, the CAAD9's are just as good and can be had for killer prices. I like Cannondales cause they fit me well.
     
  6. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    Over-inflated, too-skinny tires will make a ride feel much, much more uncomfortable than any frame material will. Virtually every diamond-shaped frame, no matter the material, is very, very stiff in the plane of motion over and after a bump. The stiffness of the design comes into play when you're mashing on the pedals and the frame flexes sideways. So I'd pick a frame that FITS you--that you will be able to make far more comfortable through adjustment and accessory choice than a poorly-fitting frame that "seems" more flexible.

    Jason
     
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  7. jmitro

    jmitro New Member

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    what is the general consensus regarding durability of aluminum vs carbon frames? i know there are variables, but does aluminum retain strength/rigidity longer than carbon?
     
  8. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Caad 10 aluminum with 105?... less than $1500 retail and lighter than many carbon bikes. Just about one of the nicest looking new bikes on the market imo.

    If money is no issue, get the most you can afford.

    If you need to save, go alu and spend the extra dough on extra shorts/bibs and cool accesories... you'll need that stuff anyway.

    I got back into riding after a long layoff last year and ended up initially buying a 'new' steel Masi with 105, lovely bike, got many comments, came in at 22lbs. Very comfortable, but very wiggly in a sprint at full tilt. Started racing again and picked up an SL3, what an amazing bike. Too much bike for Cat5, YES. Finally settled on my lovely aluminum Cinelli Xperience with a blend of DA and Ultegra, and some 101's. It's a gorgeous bike but I am not afraid to a) crash in a sprint, b) throw it into the back of a van with a lot of other bikes, and c) get dropped on the off-chance I didn't do my homework and come in dead last looking like a total tool on a $5k bike... only on a $3k one /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif .

    Despite the nonsense you hear on the park bench, a modern aluminum frame will last as long as you need it to.
     
  9. ProdigalCyclist

    ProdigalCyclist New Member

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    How bout this one http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2011/Road/F-Series/F75.aspx ?

    It has the race geometry... 105 components... and is a sweet looking bike. @$1500 MSRP Also, Felt is very good at standing behind thier product. A good freind of mine owns a shop and sells Felt and they are currently his favorite company to deal with.

    Fuji also sells a Roubaix 1.0 in that range with 105 components... it's a nice bike too.
     
  10. jkyle

    jkyle New Member

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    Buy the one that fits. End of story. :)

    Aside from that, if you can wait these are my thoughts (for what they're worth).

    I really enjoy my carbon, but I bought it because I liked the way it rode compared to the other bikes I test drove. And I test drove a whole lot of bikes. I'm not saying the reason it rode best is because it's carbon. Just that you should buy the bike that feels best to you.

    On the components, they are far, far cheaper up front than if you buy them incrementally. And if you're not versed in bike mechanics, can be somewhat of a hassle to upgrade the first time around…or even more expensive if you opt to pay your LBS to do so.

    I was in the same price range you're quoting when I bought my Specialized Roubaix. I opted for the Triple Elite with 105's. The upgrade of the crank set to a Compact configuration cost more than what I would have paid extra initially if I'd purchased a model with those components.

    I was perfectly happy with my 105's and the only reason I ended up with an Ultegra upgrade was due to some ridiculous sale/discount. My point is, if you think you'll ever want to upgrade your components just bite the bullet and do it up front. Even if it takes an extra month or two to save for the price increase.

    The last factor would be weight. The only way I'd really let that be a deciding factor is if you planned on competing and you were down to your absolute minimum weight. Otherwise, it's just all around cheaper to drop 5lbs around the waste. If you're not competing…who even cares?

    But again, the best bike is the bike that fits you and that you like to ride.
     
  11. Kraig

    Kraig New Member

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    Lol... since we brought this thread back from the dead, does anyone have a clue what he bought? Especially since after reading all of these posts and looking at all of the bikes mentioned, I'm ready to go shopping!
     
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  12. rparedes

    rparedes New Member

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    generally speaking, the biggest difference is HT length... for similar sizes and TT lengths....say 56cm, there is about a 20mm difference in HT. If you want the SAME position, you'll have to get a higher rise stem....
     
  13. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    http://www.cyclingforums.com/forum/newestpost/483426
    I believe this was the last time he posted about buying his bike. Chc out the thread.
     
  14. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    I am sitting here thinking about my bicycling over the past few months. I see a lot of riders. I cannot tell you what frame material or component group any of them have. But I can tell you which ones are good by looking at their legs.

    I ride a low end aluminum frame (under $300). My previous frame was carbon fiber Orbea (more expensive than your budget) - it died in a horrible car/bike accident that almost did me in. The components are Campy - I wanted hidden brake and shifter cables). The cassettes are Shimano - makes all my wheels interchangeable.. My other bike (from the 80's) has a mix of components.

    If you have the legs, any bike will serve you well. If you don't have the legs, no bike will make you look good.
     
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  15. DVNDSN

    DVNDSN New Member

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    I am new here and am a little confused on what "BB" means. Can you (or anyone who responds) clarify what that means? If possible, direct me to a page that has all the abbreviations laid out and explained. Thank you so much!
     
  16. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    Bottom Bracket
    if you hang out here for a while you will learn quite a bit !
     
  17. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html

    AASHTA (As Always, Sheldon Has The Answer), even though he is no longer biking in the earthly plane...

    Jason
     
  18. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    he is a legend,
     
  19. Reid2

    Reid2 Member

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    Yes, I don't think anyone in the world will dispute the statement that Sheldon is the greatest help in the history of cycling.
    He never failed to take time to reply to any email. I know that he helped me on a couple of occasions, and I was and am a nobody.
    He always had a kind word and his website, alive today via his friends and family, show his wonders of organized thought and logic and good humor.

    He got me enthused enough to make a beginner's tutorial, and it happens to be about the old school B.B. or bottom bracket,
    not what you roadies use, but, it worked in 1900, and hundreds of millions of bikes still grind them today. I thought of Sheldon when talking,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVWBEI1rvjk
     
  20. Ranger63

    Ranger63 New Member

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    For ride quality I love the carbon fibre (and yeah, the bikesdirect CF Motobecane probably falls in low end even though it's monocoque)
    For acceleration you can't beat the stiff CF bottom bracket.
    That said: IF it goes down you're looking at a new frame and fork.
    If I were going with non CF I'd go with a triple butted steel alloy from reynolds or columbus. At the end of a metric or centruy your body will thank you.
     
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