% Carbs and recovery from high intensity efforts

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by ptooey, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. ptooey

    ptooey New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello,
    I have started this thread as kind of a spinoff on the "high intensity and weightloss" thread. My question is fairly simple:

    Does the %carbs in one's diet have a noticeable effect on one's ability to recover from higher intensity Z5 or even Z4 workouts???

    I checked out a few of my days on Fitday.com and see that I have been ranging from 38-48% carbs, 25-35% pro, and 20-30% fat. I don't want to simply be told that my % carbs are wayyy too low and % protein wayyy to high - I am looking for something backed up with some solid, scientific studies => Would I see a performance increase if I upped my % carbs to 60-70% (good carbs, of course - oatmeal, whole grains)?????

    Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. acoggan

    acoggan Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Messages:
    3,047
    Likes Received:
    9
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=2055827&query_hl=18&itool=pubmed_docsum
     
  3. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    4,687
    Likes Received:
    4
    I've recently read Serious Cycling by Burke, which has some nutrition advice relating to recovery. He says that the muscles are most sensitive to glycogen replenishment within 2 hrs after exercise, which means eating carbs during this period is more important to recovery than eating them at other times of the day. Also, insulin production aids this process, which means simple carbs speed this process more than complex. Small amounts of protein (the magical 1:4 ratio) assists the process, but more than that slows gastric emptying and delays the processing and absorption of the carbs. And here I thought trackies eating cake and drinking soda was a joke. :)

    Anyway, I know that didn't answer your question, but the point was that *when* you eat the carbs may be as (or more) important as what percentage you eat, where recovery is concerned. BTW, Burke suggests 60% carbs overall.
     
  4. ptooey

    ptooey New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you very much for the link, Andy - that is exactly what I was looking for. And WOW! that IS significant. Even on my higher days I am a tad under 5gr/kg. OK - I am going to change up my diet a bit and see how it works for me. Ill try to remember to post up a progress report. Thanks again.
     
  5. fabiosav

    fabiosav New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    1
    Really good one Andy. Amazing study
     
  6. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    3,866
    Likes Received:
    1
    Frenchyge, the "magic" 4:1 ratio isn't validated, and there's no evidence to support that. Andy Coggan, has previously suggested that the ratio would be much higher (e.g., ~ 10:1), while actual research (e.g. Jentjens et al 2001, see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=11457801&query_hl=2&itool=pubmed_docsum) showed that the addition of protein to post exercise carbs had no positive effect on post exercise muscle glycogen.

    Supposedly, it's high glycaemic carbodydrates (rather than e.g., simple) that are best used, and probably sooner rather than later.

    Information from various sports scientists suggest that for trained athletes you should consume specific amounts of macro nutrients (e.g., X grams of carbs per day) rather than a percentage (e.g., 60%). For e.g., if you only consumed 1000 Kcal/day even if 90% of that was carbs it still wouldn't be a lot.

    Actual amount of carbs you need to take will be dependent on the amount of training that you do, your body mass, etc. For e.g., if your training volume is low (e.g., 6 - 8 hrs/week) you may need only 6 - 7 g/kg/day for carbs. whereas if you train more (e.g., 10 - 14 hr/week) you may need 7 - 10 g/kg/day, and if you're doing stage races you'll likely need 10 - 12 g/kg/day.

    Obviously, for some cyclists you also have to think about weight management (e.g., you maybe trying to lose weight) and you have to view this with the training you're doing and how it may have an impact on you. In many cases it's more important to eat sufficiently and train well, and recover, rather than compromising your ability to put out a good training session.

    If you are aiming for a negative energy balance, then it shouldn't be carbs you're looking to cut, but firstly alcohol, then fats, and also to look at protein intake. Most people in the western world eat far too much protein, even vegetarians can meet and exceed protein needs.

    For your standard racer you may only require 1 to 1.5 g/kg/day of protein (depending on your training regime) and this can easily be met in a normal diet without supplementation. For e.g., i'm an ovo-lacto vegetarian and the last time i did a dietary analysis on myself i found my protein intake to be ~ 2g/kg/day, which is the upper limit of protein requirements (and that, which maybe required by someone riding a Grand Tour).

    Ric
     
Loading...
Loading...