Care and feeding of carbon fiber?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by LF, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. LF

    LF Guest

    I'm the proud owner of a new-to-me Specialized Epic Allez, carbon
    fiber tubes with aluminum lugs. It's destined to become a fixed-gear
    bike. I've read about the potential failures with this construction,
    but it seems solid to the LBS specialized dealer and to me

    This is my first cf bike. Anything I need to know about cleaning and
    protecting cf? I'd like to protect it with probably a coat of wax.

    Thanks,
    Larry
     
    Tags:


  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 10 Jan 2006 12:48:17 -0800, "LF" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm the proud owner of a new-to-me Specialized Epic Allez, carbon
    >fiber tubes with aluminum lugs. It's destined to become a fixed-gear
    >bike. I've read about the potential failures with this construction,
    >but it seems solid to the LBS specialized dealer and to me
    >
    >This is my first cf bike. Anything I need to know about cleaning and
    >protecting cf? I'd like to protect it with probably a coat of wax.


    Others will have additional observations...

    Some greases may attack the resin; don't grease the seatpost with
    anything that Specialized doesn't explicitly endorse for that purpose.
    Don't let headset grease slop into the head tube.

    For protective wax, most automotive waxes can be used as long as they
    don't have abrasives in them; anything that says "cleaner" or "polish"
    probably has some abrasive content.

    With a fixie, as long as you keep the chain taut, there's very little
    else to be concerned about IMO...though putting something like a
    lizard skin on the right chainstay "just in case" isn't a bad idea.


    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  3. Does that bike have Horizontal dropouts, or are you getting the
    Phil-Wood fixey hub?
     
  4. LF

    LF Guest

    Vertical drop outs, and an old Phil hub - not an asymmetrical or
    special one. I think with some careful measurements, mathematics,
    fixed-gear charts, a half-link, trial and error, and a bit of luck, it
    will work. Of course, a dremmel might come in handy too.
    Regards,
    Larry
     
  5. Luke

    Luke Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, LF
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Vertical drop outs, and an old Phil hub - not an asymmetrical or
    > special one. I think with some careful measurements, mathematics,
    > fixed-gear charts, a half-link, trial and error, and a bit of luck, it
    > will work. Of course, a dremmel might come in handy too.
    > Regards,
    > Larry
    >


    This bike's CF chainstays are very vulnerable to damage from a fixed
    gear chain derailment and/or jamming. That, along with its vertical
    drops and the challenges they pose to achieving and maintaining optimal
    chain tension prompt me to question the wisdom of using this frame for
    a fixed gear bike.

    Luke
     
  6. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    Luke wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, LF
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Vertical drop outs, and an old Phil hub - not an asymmetrical or
    > > special one. I think with some careful measurements, mathematics,
    > > fixed-gear charts, a half-link, trial and error, and a bit of luck, it
    > > will work. Of course, a dremmel might come in handy too.
    > > Regards,
    > > Larry
    > >

    >
    > This bike's CF chainstays are very vulnerable to damage from a fixed
    > gear chain derailment and/or jamming. That, along with its vertical
    > drops and the challenges they pose to achieving and maintaining optimal
    > chain tension prompt me to question the wisdom of using this frame for
    > a fixed gear bike.
    >
    > Luke


    There are very times when a derailment on a fixed gear doesn't carry a
    strong risk of seriously messing the RIDER up. That's more important,
    and any fixie with something going on that makes derailment
    significantly likely shouldn't be ridden. However, with a correctly set
    up and maintained fixed drivetrain this isn't more of an issue than any
    other freak mechanical failure - to which fixed gears are inherently
    less prone anyway.

    Various places on the net, there are programs that calculate gear
    combinations for single-cog, tensionerless, vertical dropout setups
    that allow for a tensioned chain. The good solution, however, is to use
    an ENO hub.
     
  7. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    Meant to say very FEW times.
     
  8. Luke

    Luke Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Nate Knutson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There are very times when a derailment on a fixed gear doesn't carry a
    > strong risk of seriously messing the RIDER up. That's more important,
    > and any fixie with something going on that makes derailment
    > significantly likely shouldn't be ridden. However, with a correctly set
    > up and maintained fixed drivetrain this isn't more of an issue than any
    > other freak mechanical failure - to which fixed gears are inherently
    > less prone anyway.


    The term 'strong risk' is open to interpretation, and though I've never
    been injured from a derailment I yield your point. However, my
    experience is that sometimes what makes a derailment 'significantly
    likely' can be nothing more than an uneven road surface taken at a
    certain speed with a specific force or lack thereof on the pedals.

    Though rare (my FG is ridden most everyday; derailment rate is approx.
    1/year), I wonder if it's accurate to characterize a chain derailment
    on a fixie as a 'freak mechanical failure'. To me, it's a fact of life,
    albeit one occurring infrequently, when the FG is ridden regularly on
    typical roads - at least as typical roads are consituted around here.
    I've had properly set chains derail through an unhappy confluence of
    unremarkable factors (usually encountered while descending bumpy hills
    with no tension on the chain's top run).

    The OP's correctly setting and maintaining the drivetrain is
    constrained by the vertical dropouts. Even assuming that a half-link
    and discernment in chainring/cog choices initially provide ideal chain
    tension, it will only deteriorate with wear; there's no recourse to
    improvement save for replacement of components. IMO this poses a
    significant obstacle to meeting the qualification of a 'correctly set
    and maintained fixed drivetrain'.

    >
    > Various places on the net, there are programs that calculate gear
    > combinations for single-cog, tensionerless, vertical dropout setups
    > that allow for a tensioned chain. The good solution, however, is to use
    > an ENO hub.


    I agree an eccentric hub for this project is definitely a better choice.

    Luke
     
  9. LF wrote:
    > I'm the proud owner of a new-to-me Specialized Epic Allez, carbon
    > fiber tubes with aluminum lugs. It's destined to become a fixed-gear
    > bike. I've read about the potential failures with this construction,
    > but it seems solid to the LBS specialized dealer and to me
    >
    > This is my first cf bike. Anything I need to know about cleaning and
    > protecting cf? I'd like to protect it with probably a coat of wax.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Larry


    I have a friend riding one of those Specialized frames. Riding it
    since mid to early 1990s. He weighs 225 at his skinniest. The bike
    more or less lives in the back of his pickup. Its never seen an ounce
    of kindness or care. It looks ratty. But it still works fine. About
    the only care you need to give it is to not intentionally cut the tubes
    in half with a hacksaw.
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >I'm the proud owner of a new-to-me Specialized Epic Allez, carbon
    >fiber tubes with aluminum lugs. It's destined to become a fixed-gear
    >bike. I've read about the potential failures with this construction,
    >but it seems solid to the LBS specialized dealer and to me


    Nice frame. I currently have one of these, the second I have owned, waiting
    to be built up. Only the early models of this frame had issues with the
    dissimilar materials coming apart. The later models are better in that
    respect.

    >This is my first cf bike. Anything I need to know about cleaning and
    >protecting cf? I'd like to protect it with probably a coat of wax.


    Nothing special. The tubes have a clear coat, so it is just like any other
    painted bike. Wash and wax as usual.
    --------------
    Alex
     
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