Careers in Nutrition?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Preston Crawford, Dec 6, 2004.

  1. I need a career change. I got a degree in English in 1997. I fell in love
    with computers while in college, though, and ended up as a programmer.
    Things have largely gone well, but the hours have been taxing and hard on
    my body (so much so that I was over 400lbs. at one point due to stress,
    lack of time, bad habits). Additionally, I am finding it harder and harder
    to find a good mid-level job where you can just do good work without
    insane hours or tons of pressure. So I'm thinking of getting out of the
    field. Especially before I'm inevitably outsourced. Something I'm very
    interested is weight loss/health issues. I used to be this (but bigger...
    I don't have a picture of me over 400lbs.)

    http://www.prestoncrawford.com/album/images/mebig2.jpg

    Now I'm this...

    http://www.prestoncrawford.com/album/images/me.jpg

    That's the skinny me (minus over 150lbs.) with my old fat clothes on
    still. I was too cheap to buy new clothes.

    Anyway, I'd like to get into Nutrition. I'm not sure if I'd want to be a
    full-fledged nutritionist. I just know that I've had an experience I'd
    like to relate to others, to help them and let them know that no matter
    how bad it gets, there is still a way out. My wife is also in the same
    boat. Down from like 350lbs.+ to 210lbs. Plus she's gone on to do a
    Half-Ironman. So we're both big believers in doing the right things to
    turn your life around.

    However, how do you parlay this into a career. Or at least some decent
    jobs where I can be happy with my work during the day. I'm hesitant to go
    back to college for 4 years and $40,000 not knowing what the future holds
    when I still have student loans. Are there other routes?

    Any advice is appreciated.

    Preston
     
    Tags:


  2. Able Grable

    Able Grable Guest

    >Subject: Careers in Nutrition?
    >From: Preston Crawford [email protected]
    >Date: 12/6/2004 7:17 PM !!!First


    >I need a career change.


    >I was over 400lbs. at one point due to stress,
    >lack of time, bad habits)


    Don't quit your day job!!!
     
  3. On 2004-12-06, Able Grable <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Subject: Careers in Nutrition?
    >>From: Preston Crawford [email protected]
    >>Date: 12/6/2004 7:17 PM !!!First

    >
    >>I need a career change.

    >
    >>I was over 400lbs. at one point due to stress,
    >>lack of time, bad habits)

    >
    > Don't quit your day job!!!


    ??????
     
  4. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    IMHO formal nutrition education is full of myths that may, in time, be
    refuted. Do you really want to be an advocate for the food pyramid?


    "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I need a career change. I got a degree in English in 1997. I fell in love
    > with computers while in college, though, and ended up as a programmer.
    > Things have largely gone well, but the hours have been taxing and hard on
    > my body (so much so that I was over 400lbs. at one point due to stress,
    > lack of time, bad habits). Additionally, I am finding it harder and harder
    > to find a good mid-level job where you can just do good work without
    > insane hours or tons of pressure. So I'm thinking of getting out of the
    > field. Especially before I'm inevitably outsourced. Something I'm very
    > interested is weight loss/health issues. I used to be this (but bigger...
    > I don't have a picture of me over 400lbs.)
    >
    > http://www.prestoncrawford.com/album/images/mebig2.jpg
    >
    > Now I'm this...
    >
    > http://www.prestoncrawford.com/album/images/me.jpg
    >
    > That's the skinny me (minus over 150lbs.) with my old fat clothes on
    > still. I was too cheap to buy new clothes.
    >
    > Anyway, I'd like to get into Nutrition. I'm not sure if I'd want to be a
    > full-fledged nutritionist. I just know that I've had an experience I'd
    > like to relate to others, to help them and let them know that no matter
    > how bad it gets, there is still a way out. My wife is also in the same
    > boat. Down from like 350lbs.+ to 210lbs. Plus she's gone on to do a
    > Half-Ironman. So we're both big believers in doing the right things to
    > turn your life around.
    >
    > However, how do you parlay this into a career. Or at least some decent
    > jobs where I can be happy with my work during the day. I'm hesitant to go
    > back to college for 4 years and $40,000 not knowing what the future holds
    > when I still have student loans. Are there other routes?
    >
    > Any advice is appreciated.
    >
    > Preston
     
  5. Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to be
    truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on new
    studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's self
    updated........
     
  6. On 2004-12-07, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    > health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to be
    > truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on new
    > studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    > The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    > gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    > theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's self
    > updated........
    >


    That's what I would like to do. I was hoping for an answer with some
    substance. I was beginning to get worried there for a moment that this
    newsgroup was just a battleground for people's OPINIONS on health. Thanks
    for proving to me that there is a little sanity here. Obviously not the
    place to come to ask the kind of question I'm asking, though.

    Preston
     
  7. Rob Barrie

    Rob Barrie Guest

    Preston,
    First, congratulations to you and your wife for loosing weight !!

    There is something that may be just what you are looking for.

    We are coming from similar backgrounds. I actually owned a software
    company. I not sure which is more of a... hummm... let me say
    "challenge". Being a programmer or being the owner. Anyway I escaped
    that rat race by selling the company and made the move into nutrition.
    Not as a nutritionist, from what I have observed it's hard to make a
    living doing that.

    I working with a new device developed at the University of Utah (with
    lots of funding from the National Science Foundation) that measures
    carotenoid antioxidants directly in tissue, quickly and non-invasively.
    It turns out carotenoids are an excellent biomarker for the rest of
    the antioxidants and in fact can measure if you diet or your supplement
    regime is making it to your tissue... not your blood, but your tissue,
    where all the cellular action is.

    This is new on the market and it has taken me a year to find the right
    niche, and it's with the main stream medical community. Now it is
    taking off because more and more of the healthcare industry is moving
    toward integrative medicine which includes prevention and nutrition....
    And this device can measure a biomarker for that.

    Go look at www.nutritionalscanner.com for more details.

    I am actively looking for distributors and team leaders in all 50
    states, Asia and Europe.

    Note that we are not selling these devices. Only offering them on a
    lease or as a service. Also note that this is not a sales job in the
    traditional sense. For one, I have people calling me to see how & when
    they can get one - That's Refreshing !!

    If you are interested drop me a note at [email protected]. If not
    you may want to check it out anyway and get you antioxidants measured.
    Be Well
    RB
     
  8. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    You seem to have already made up your mind. However, you might review:

    http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html

    I'm not an expert on Paleo, but I can see that they make enough logical
    points to question the current view of nutrition.

    IMHO: Nutritional studies have been engineered and cherry-picked to support
    the traditional views.


    "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:s[email protected]
    > On 2004-12-07, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    > > health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to be
    > > truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on new
    > > studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    > > The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    > > gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    > > theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's self
    > > updated........
    > >

    >
    > That's what I would like to do. I was hoping for an answer with some
    > substance. I was beginning to get worried there for a moment that this
    > newsgroup was just a battleground for people's OPINIONS on health. Thanks
    > for proving to me that there is a little sanity here. Obviously not the
    > place to come to ask the kind of question I'm asking, though.
    >
    > Preston
     
  9. On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You seem to have already made up your mind. However, you might review:
    >
    > http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html
    >
    > I'm not an expert on Paleo, but I can see that they make enough logical
    > points to question the current view of nutrition.
    >
    > IMHO: Nutritional studies have been engineered and cherry-picked to support
    > the traditional views.


    I lost over 170lbs. by eating according to what you consider to be
    out-dated standards and by exercising.

    My wife has lost similarly.

    Pretty simple, in my book. I have personal anecdotal evidence that I don't
    even need to consider the paleo diet, at least not for myself.

    Preston

    >
    >
    > "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On 2004-12-07, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    >> > health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to be
    >> > truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on new
    >> > studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    >> > The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    >> > gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    >> > theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's self
    >> > updated........
    >> >

    >>
    >> That's what I would like to do. I was hoping for an answer with some
    >> substance. I was beginning to get worried there for a moment that this
    >> newsgroup was just a battleground for people's OPINIONS on health. Thanks
    >> for proving to me that there is a little sanity here. Obviously not the
    >> place to come to ask the kind of question I'm asking, though.
    >>
    >> Preston

    >
    >
     
  10. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    170 is a great achievement. Do you attribute it to low fat low calorie, or
    did your exercise dominate the process?

    Were you hungry the whole time?


    "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > You seem to have already made up your mind. However, you might review:
    > >
    > > http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html
    > >
    > > I'm not an expert on Paleo, but I can see that they make enough logical
    > > points to question the current view of nutrition.
    > >
    > > IMHO: Nutritional studies have been engineered and cherry-picked to

    support
    > > the traditional views.

    >
    > I lost over 170lbs. by eating according to what you consider to be
    > out-dated standards and by exercising.
    >
    > My wife has lost similarly.
    >
    > Pretty simple, in my book. I have personal anecdotal evidence that I don't
    > even need to consider the paleo diet, at least not for myself.
    >
    > Preston
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> On 2004-12-07, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> > Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    > >> > health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to

    be
    > >> > truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on

    new
    > >> > studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    > >> > The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    > >> > gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    > >> > theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's

    self
    > >> > updated........
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> That's what I would like to do. I was hoping for an answer with some
    > >> substance. I was beginning to get worried there for a moment that this
    > >> newsgroup was just a battleground for people's OPINIONS on health.

    Thanks
    > >> for proving to me that there is a little sanity here. Obviously not the
    > >> place to come to ask the kind of question I'm asking, though.
    > >>
    > >> Preston

    > >
    > >
     
  11. On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    > 170 is a great achievement. Do you attribute it to low fat low calorie, or
    > did your exercise dominate the process?


    Actually, I attribute it to plenty of exercise, lots of veggies and fruits
    and lots of high-quality carbs (i.e. sprouted grains, true whole wheats,
    etc.) and cutting out refined sugar, red meat and pork. So it was low fat,
    definitely. It also was and is low on the refined sugars.

    > Were you hungry the whole time?


    I was never hungry. I'm still not.

    Preston

    > "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > You seem to have already made up your mind. However, you might review:
    >> >
    >> > http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html
    >> >
    >> > I'm not an expert on Paleo, but I can see that they make enough logical
    >> > points to question the current view of nutrition.
    >> >
    >> > IMHO: Nutritional studies have been engineered and cherry-picked to

    > support
    >> > the traditional views.

    >>
    >> I lost over 170lbs. by eating according to what you consider to be
    >> out-dated standards and by exercising.
    >>
    >> My wife has lost similarly.
    >>
    >> Pretty simple, in my book. I have personal anecdotal evidence that I don't
    >> even need to consider the paleo diet, at least not for myself.
    >>
    >> Preston
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Preston Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> > news:[email protected]
    >> >> On 2004-12-07, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> > Good grief.......I think it is a little strong to say 'myths' - any
    >> >> > health science is constantly changing and evolving - things held to

    > be
    >> >> > truths in previous years are oftentimes proven to be false based on

    > new
    >> >> > studies, new methods of studies - other long held truths are upheld.
    >> >> > The same is true of all the quasi scientific junk that passes for
    >> >> > gospel in the media. I believe in a good background in scientific
    >> >> > theory and methodology, and then continuous learning to keep one's

    > self
    >> >> > updated........
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> That's what I would like to do. I was hoping for an answer with some
    >> >> substance. I was beginning to get worried there for a moment that this
    >> >> newsgroup was just a battleground for people's OPINIONS on health.

    > Thanks
    >> >> for proving to me that there is a little sanity here. Obviously not the
    >> >> place to come to ask the kind of question I'm asking, though.
    >> >>
    >> >> Preston
    >> >
    >> >

    >
    >
     
  12. >On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>170 is a great achievement. Do you attribute it to low fat low

    calorie, or
    >>did your exercise dominate the process?


    >Actually, I attribute it to plenty of exercise, lots of veggies and

    fruits
    >and lots of high-quality carbs (i.e. sprouted grains, true whole

    wheats,
    >etc.) and cutting out refined sugar, red meat and pork. So it was low

    fat,
    >definitely. It also was and is low on the refined sugars.


    Excellent advice! Preston has pretty much nailed it. Let me add a
    few more things.

    Excercise: Exercise doesn't have to mean sweating it out in a gym for
    hours on end. While you'll want to start lifting some weights and
    maybe using some cardio machines in a gym, you can quite a lot of
    exercise by walking, washing the car, walking the dog, using stairs
    instead of elevators, always parking on the far end of parking lot,
    doing manual yard work, riding a bike, roller blading, golfing, etc.
    Just don't let yourself sit around... TURN OFF THE TV and go find
    something to do. Find a hobby that keeps you moving... but do
    something.

    Whole grains: Let me ephasize whole grains, by saying if the first
    ingredient doesn't say whole grain or 100% whole grain, then don't eat
    it. And "Wheat flour" doesn't cut it. .. it's crap.

    Refined sugar: Drastically reduce your consumption of refined sugar.
    First, give up soda. They're calories that don't fill you up. This
    move alone will knock off pounds. Fruit punches are also garbage.

    Drinks: Here's your drink list.
    Water (add a slice of lemon if you want some taste)
    Skim milk or Soy milk ("Silk" in the red box tastes really good!)
    Green tea
    Small amounts of pure fruit juice

    Meat: Make meat a side dish, not a main course. A serving size
    shouldn't be any bigger than the back of your hand. Hot dogs,
    sausages, and lunch meat are crap. Instead eat fish, lean turkey,
    chicken and lean beef... game meat (dear, buffalo, etc. are also good
    choices.

    >> Were you hungry the whole time?


    >I was never hungry. I'm still not.


    I've been eating healthy (plus working out and staying active) for the
    last 22 years. I'm now 41. My waist size is the same as it was when
    I graduated from high school -- 31 inches. And my weight has only
    increased 10 pounds, all of which is muscle. This year I ran a half
    marathon (13 miles) in well under 2 hours without running more than 5
    miles at a time in preparation. I attribute this performance to a
    excellent diet.

    Food is your fuel. Give your body crappy fuel and it won't perform for
    crap. But give a constant supply of the good stuff, and your energy
    will soar.

    Here's where you start:
    1) Go to a doctor and get a complete physical to make sure you're
    healthy.
    2) Then buy some excellent walking shoes
    3) Next, start cutting out the crappy food/drinks. Start reading
    labels instead of price tags. Sometimes the good stuff will cost a
    little more, but think of it this way... the good stuff is a lot
    cheaper than medications and doctor visits.
    4) Start walking/moving. On your free time, don't sit around... stay
    active.

    Do this for a couple months and you'll be amazed at the results.
    Good luck.

    Patrick
     
  13. >IMHO formal nutrition education is full of myths that may, in time, be
    >refuted. Do you really want to be an advocate for the food pyramid?


    The formal nutrition education I know hasn't changed much over the
    years.

    Small amounts of vegetable oil and nuts
    Some lean meats
    Some skim/low-fat dairy
    Lots of fruits and vegetables
    Lots of whole grains

    Works for me.

    Patrick
     
  14. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >On 2004-12-08, Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Here's where you start:

    > 1) Go to a doctor and get a complete physical to make sure you're
    > healthy.
    > 2) Then buy some excellent walking shoes


    What? Exercise? Damn heresy on this board. People want to lose weight
    sitting on the couch playing video games and zero exertion. Fill in the
    BS reason why the can't find the time and an exercise that compliments
    their life style. When will people pull their heads out of that dark
    region and note that simply being thin does not mean you are healthy any
    more then some extra weight means your going out early. If you don't
    add some basic exercise into your life, plan on a shity quality of life
    while you're here and either an early departure or some very miserable
    aging. The heart for instance, is a muscle. Simple inhaling and
    exhaling is not exercise.

    > 3) Next, start cutting out the crappy food/drinks. Start reading
    > labels instead of price tags. Sometimes the good stuff will cost a
    > little more, but think of it this way... the good stuff is a lot
    > cheaper than medications and doctor visits.
    > 4) Start walking/moving. On your free time, don't sit around... stay
    > active.
    >
    > Do this for a couple months and you'll be amazed at the results.
    > Good luck.


    And we wonder why our kids are getting fatter - rhetorical. Take a look
    at the direction they get from their parents. Hang out in a grocery
    store some time ands witness the obese parents with the obese kids
    pushing a basket of chips, dips, cookies, etc. It's too many calories
    from too many simple sugars. And all these BS fad diets just add to the
    confusion.

    -DF
     
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