CarNage: Do we blame it on the Food we feed our brains?



rooman

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Mar 11, 2005
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I have a theory...I'm sure its not mine alone...and it is about societal behaviour. That thing that is the result of what we as individuals do, which is repeated by our peers. It is driven by needs, some conscious, some endocrine, some learned behaviours, and all are linked to the brain, and its ability to act/react to stumuli...

where am I going with this?

well today in a rare moment of stupidity ( when I left all of N+1 in their room and I actually drove my car to the fruit shop... ( OK it is a bio-diesel, and seems to hate fuel stations...but)...it occurred to me that either I was driving slowly, or everyone else was impatient, short on time, just had to get around me and everyone else for what ever reason seemed to totally ignore the fact that I and other humans were trying to go about our lives and get from a to b safely (and arrive alive).

I tried to think of the common denominator for their behaviour, beyond herd mentality...is it that they dont know any better?, are driven by need?, desire?, fear?, or some urge to act reckelessly?, irresponsibly and uncaringly....??

hmm now what would do that?, what is it that a huge proportion of our population do, that delivers this outcome?...

we all sleep, we all breathe, we all go to the loo...nah, thats been human habit since we came down from the trees....

OK, we all feed our brains with what we hope are nutrients to enable it and our bits to function (getting warm here!!)..

Now in many societies that has been the case for centuries and still they seem to get on just fine, they seem to manage their living in close quarters with give and take and let their neighbours go first...all lovey dovey stuff...and in those societies there is a common thread, a common use of natural unprocessed foods which are thin on chemicals of mass production (destruction?)..hence a brain that functions as intended by she who is your chosen diety/maker/great planner..whatever...
BUT do we do that, do we in the mechanised urban society we define as "developed" do act reasonably, caringly, and consistenly well when in charge of mechanised objects or competing on a roadway we all expect to share and try to dominate...why is that ?.... what is it that we do, that is pretty much our downfall?
What dictates behaviour that seems to be getting worse, when we have a responsibility to discharge we somehow we get the wires crossed....?

hmmm we take substances... we take alcohol..the law defines a limit and over that we get put away...so its not just that...we have illegal drugs and substances considered illegal which the law defines as inappropriate for consumption and views dimly any use of a mechanised object on a public roadway if under the influence etc...so its its not just that...

what we are more open to is something that we nearly all do or are affected by...hmmm

I was reading this blog on Nutrition and as I was puzzling my little lump of grey and white matter on the issue of human behaviour and changing it for the better concerning attitudes towards riders of bicycles, I saw this gem:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/ymmuz7 (its long but makes darn serious sense of all this)

I know kids can get hyperactive if they eat the wrong foods... but what about if we nearly all eat the wrong foods...is it reasonable to suggest that whilst that in itself may not be solely responsible for our atrocious behaviour on the roads, could it be a contributor....a major contributor at that!

This last week has been ghastly for our riding fraternity, we have had major crashes with groups and sole riders hit by inattentive, substance abused and speeding motorists resulting in hospitalisations , serious long term injuries and unfortunate saddening senseless deaths.

I reckon society needs to get its collective brain in order, to feed it (the brain) properly and have it act naturally and caringly towards our fellow man, as to me it appears that this very brain is suffering serious subtance abuse from the very nutrients our food production industry is making available to us and suggesting that such food is good, wholesome and all we need to function in our society...

The use of colourings, preservatives, overprocessing and output enhancements all which remove and alter nutritional components have to be a concern to you ...

Am I barking up the wrong tree here or is there merit in this line.

Is behaviour deterioriating because of what we feed our brains?

And

Is it that we , who choose to ride our bikes and thus are regarded as highly vulnerable road users, are the first casualties in the war between brain function and bad brain food?

Is the brain losing the battle?

Discuss........
 
R

ray

Guest
rooman wrote:
> I have a theory...
> <snip>
> Is the brain losing the battle?
>
> Discuss........
>
>

Hard to say. There has always been a quota of morons about, in former
times as weapons they had bows and arrows or bone clubs, now they have
cars. On the available record, there's been little fundamental change in
human behaviour in the last 40 centuries or so.
Chemicals/additives et al are probably not doing us any good, but
probably too early to say. Females now get their periods at average age
13 instead of 16 150 years ago, but is this an improvement?
As computer programmers used to say, `Insufficient data'.
 

rooman

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Mar 11, 2005
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ray said:
rooman wrote:
> I have a theory...
> <snip>
> Is the brain losing the battle?
>
> Discuss........
>
>

Hard to say. There has always been a quota of morons about, in former
times as weapons they had bows and arrows or bone clubs, now they have
cars. On the available record, there's been little fundamental change in
human behaviour in the last 40 centuries or so.
Chemicals/additives et al are probably not doing us any good, but
probably too early to say. Females now get their periods at average age
13 instead of 16 150 years ago, but is this an improvement?
As computer programmers used to say, `Insufficient data'.
There is strong movement to address childhood obesity, with ride to school programs (bike buses and other school commuting activities involving physical activity etc) parental and health authorities concern over diet related ADHD... and aims to address peripheral artery disease, diabetes, Cardio Pulmonary disease, etc, all dietry related...( or lousy food choices more likely)

only in more publicised subjects of the raised incidence of depression in all sectors of society... and substance abuse affecting behaviour and raised crime activity amongst those involved (it all makes me shiver) do we find that health authorities and politicians are interested, but they do not wish to go anywhere near the possibility that our modern diet is changing our behaviour tolerances for the worse.

Just might have to go back to school and get a research scholarship for a PhD in diet induced societal behavioural change and the role the bicycle could have in saving mankind as we might want it to be ( and save the planet at the same time)...

Meanwhile too many people are getting knocked off their bikes...be careful out there people!!
 

flyingdutch

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Feb 8, 2004
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I have a theory.
'All' cyclists drink excessive coffee.
Cyclists attract cars more than the average bear.

Therefore the logic is irrefutable - Coffee makes you magnetic!!!

Flying"not riding today due to drinking injury"Dutch :(
 
B

Bleve

Guest
rooman wrote:

> Just might have to go back to school and get a research scholarship for
> a PhD in diet induced societal behavioural change and the role the
> bicycle could have in saving mankind as we might want it to be ( and
> save the planet at the same time)...


Maybe have a look at the effects of population density and accountabily
before you spend 4+years on this pursuit. It's your time to spend, of
course ...
 
V

Vincent Patrick

Guest
Bleve wrote:

>
> rooman wrote:
>
>> Just might have to go back to school and get a research scholarship for
>> a PhD in diet induced societal behavioural change and the role the
>> bicycle could have in saving mankind as we might want it to be ( and
>> save the planet at the same time)...

>
> Maybe have a look at the effects of population density and accountabily
> before you spend 4+years on this pursuit. It's your time to spend, of
> course ...


Japan has a high population density and relatively thin people with a low
crime rate. Diet? Population differences? Cultural norms? Who knows.

Cheers,

Vince
 

ritcho

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May 24, 2004
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flyingdutch said:
I have a theory.
'All' cyclists drink excessive coffee.
Cyclists attract cars more than the average bear.

Therefore the logic is irrefutable - Coffee makes you magnetic!!!

Flying"not riding today due to drinking injury"Dutch :(

So _that's_ where you were... we were all waiting for you at Doncaster SC this morning!

Ritch
 

flyingdutch

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Feb 8, 2004
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ritcho said:
So _that's_ where you were... we were all waiting for you at Doncaster SC this morning!

Ritch

aaah, 'drinking injury' actually translates to 'glass in foot from stubby mate dropped and forgot to clean up' injury :(

was lookin forward to getting out and suffering the ups-downs of the BR, but alas tried rolling up my driveway and the hurties in foot was not goodeth!
 
T

Theo Bekkers

Guest
Vincent Patrick wrote:

> Japan has a high population density and relatively thin people with a
> low crime rate. Diet?


No, Diet is their Government.

Theo
 

cfsmtb

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Apr 11, 2003
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Vincent Patrick said:
Japan has a high population density and relatively thin people with a low
crime rate. Diet? Population differences? Cultural norms? Who knows.

Keep in mind, this is the same culture that developed manga, hentai and tentacle p0rn. :eek:
 
L

Larissa In Aus

Guest
coming out of lurkdom!

I think you are partially right. My son reacts very badly to some food
colourings, making him very aggressive and overly energetic. Natural foods
are hard to find and expensive so we eat all kinds of chemicals. Babies
from a young age are fed all kinds of chemicals in baby formula and are
more likely to suffer from obesity and diabetes than breastfed babies.

However I think there are compounding factors such as stress. Pressure is
put on everyone for everything such as success in school and career,
achievements in sport and music. Everyone had deadlines and often are in a
rush to get to the next thing. Stress releases cortisol? and that has
known effects to the body.

I also think not many of us get enough sleep. I for one do not and it
makes me tired and cranky.

Interesting food for thought. Cyclists are getting exercise and may be
slightly healthier than those who do no exercise. Maybe this counteracts
some of the unhealthy food and other factors that effect people.

Larissa
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Mon, 18 Dec 2006 10:48:48 +1100
Larissa In Aus <[email protected].au> wrote:
> Interesting food for thought. Cyclists are getting exercise and may be
> slightly healthier than those who do no exercise. Maybe this counteracts
> some of the unhealthy food and other factors that effect people.
>


On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
in impatience, parking where they feel like it - then people would
consider that bad behaviour. It still is when cyclists do it, it's
just not as frightening.



Zebee
 

EuanB

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Jan 11, 2005
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rooman said:
Now in many societies that has been the case for centuries and still they seem to get on just fine, they seem to manage their living in close quarters with give and take and let their neighbours go first...all lovey dovey stuff...and in those societies there is a common thread, a common use of natural unprocessed foods which are thin on chemicals of mass production (destruction?)..hence a brain that functions as intended by she who is your chosen diety/maker/great planner..whatever...

Have you seen Jamie's School Dinners? http://www.channel4.com/life/microsites/J/jamies_school_dinners/ If you haven't I highly reccomend it.

At one stage Jamie took on a pair of particularly reisistant children and persuaded the family to follow his prescribed diet for a couple of weeks. The parents reckon it changed their children for the better, they were less argumentative, more attentive, calmer etc etc. They gave them some of their customry junk as a treat and it was back to square one; tantrums, hyperactivity etc etc.

Diet plays a much bigger part in our mental well being than most people recognize.
 
E

Euan

Guest
Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> In aus.bicycle on Mon, 18 Dec 2006 10:48:48 +1100
> Larissa In Aus <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Interesting food for thought. Cyclists are getting exercise and may be
>> slightly healthier than those who do no exercise. Maybe this counteracts
>> some of the unhealthy food and other factors that effect people.
>>

>
> On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
> cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
> in impatience, parking where they feel like it


Errr, car drivers do. At least down in Melbourne. All the above and more.

You're really in to this us and them approach, aren't you?
--
Cheers
Euan
 

rooman

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Mar 11, 2005
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Euan said:
Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> In aus.bicycle on Mon, 18 Dec 2006 10:48:48 +1100
> Larissa In Aus <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Interesting food for thought. Cyclists are getting exercise and may be
>> slightly healthier than those who do no exercise. Maybe this counteracts
>> some of the unhealthy food and other factors that effect people.
>>

>
> On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
> cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
> in impatience, parking where they feel like it


Errr, car drivers do. At least down in Melbourne. All the above and more.

snip
--
Cheers
Euan
that's what made me start this...the antics of Melbourne drivers, impatient, cue jumping, driving around anyone who eases up, even on the footpaths to get around, ducking up the left, driving aggresively, completely lacking any courteous displays intent of their own demands of self self self.... I bet they have a diet of fully processed foods, heaps of sugar, highly processed flours, flavour enhanced foods with additives, chemicals and toxins, and that isnt half of it, what about the medications they are on, have been on or will soon be on....

the brain is in a soup of chemicals, no wonder it goes haywire, and cant react to even normal stress and the cortisol levels get up, sleep patterns are detroyed, circadian rythms are out of whack, the lypmph system goes haywire and the body of Joe/Jo Average gets FAT...err obese!!.
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Tue, 19 Dec 2006 11:02:06 GMT
Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
>>
>> On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
>> cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
>> in impatience, parking where they feel like it

>
> Errr, car drivers do. At least down in Melbourne. All the above and more.


yes, that was the point. Sorry if it was too subtle, I'll try harder
next time.

>
> You're really in to this us and them approach, aren't you?


What, pointing it out when I see it? Yes.

Zebee
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Tue, 19 Dec 2006 22:56:51 +1100
rooman <[email protected]> wrote:
> that's what made me start this...the antics of Melbourne drivers,
> impatient, cue jumping, driving around anyone who eases up, even on the
> footpaths to get around, ducking up the left, driving aggresively,


And cyclists do the same. Why pick on motorists?

If it's food related then cyclists must be eating the same food.

On the other hand, perhaps it's about cultural expectations and models
and nothing to do with food....

Zebee
 
E

Euan

Guest
Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> In aus.bicycle on Tue, 19 Dec 2006 11:02:06 GMT
> Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
>>> On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
>>> cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
>>> in impatience, parking where they feel like it

>> Errr, car drivers do. At least down in Melbourne. All the above and more.

>
> yes, that was the point. Sorry if it was too subtle, I'll try harder
> next time.


No, ambiguous. The way you phrased it you make it sound like car
drivers are angelic in comparison to cyclists.
>
>> You're really in to this us and them approach, aren't you?

>
> What, pointing it out when I see it? Yes.


Then be clearer about it and say what you mean.
--
Cheers
Euan
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Wed, 20 Dec 2006 08:43:29 GMT
Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
>> In aus.bicycle on Tue, 19 Dec 2006 11:02:06 GMT
>> Euan <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
>>>> On the other hand, if car drivers displayed the behiviour seen in
>>>> cyclists - queue jumping, red light running, getting up on footpaths
>>>> in impatience, parking where they feel like it
>>> Errr, car drivers do. At least down in Melbourne. All the above and more.

>>
>> yes, that was the point. Sorry if it was too subtle, I'll try harder
>> next time.

>
> No, ambiguous. The way you phrased it you make it sound like car
> drivers are angelic in comparison to cyclists.


I was trying to say cyclists did the same things as car drivers (and
vice versa) but the vitriol was reserved for drivers.

That a cyclist wouldn't read it that was didn't occur to me, but it
should have.


I'll try and be a lot clearer when calling hypocrisy.

Zebee