Carrera makes radical decisions

Discussion in 'Your Bloody Soap Box' started by Carrera, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    Another of my bikes was stolen today. This was the Claude Butler roadbike that replaced my last stolen bike. I'd left it in a public area chained with a large, thick chain. This was a thick chain and padlock.
    While I was in the internet cafe, a man in a suit rushed in and told me he'd just seen my bike being stolen from outside his office. He managed to get a description of the thief and saw where he'd headed. He even shouted and took a description.
    Incredibly the thief had managed to cut through the chain with large bolt-cutters. As he'd done this in a public place, he runs a large risk of being caught. Of course there are cameras.
    I only wish I'd come out and collared the dude (so I could have kicked his ass in such a way as he'd think twice about stealing peoples' bikes) but, as it is, I've gone to the police and will be making a statement tonight. I didn't see the crime unfold as I was in the internet cafe.
    Basically, this changes a lot of stuff. I've decided I can't afford to to keep paying out for new bikes so the boat will have to go, especially in light of the fact this could be stolen as well and would cost me thousands of pounds as opposed to hundreds of pounds. I decided crime is now becoming more radical.
    I'll have to buy another bike and invest in huge security, scores of locks, alarms and whatever I can use. I'm going to have to limit my material possessions so I can direct my money into the security of my bikes. I'll be dismantling my other bike tonight as the next thing the garage door will be broken down in the night and another one gone.
    Yes, I'm pretty pissed off!! This is hundreds of pounds I've lost so far.
     
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  2. Dondare

    Dondare New Member

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    The boat is less likely to be stolen than your bikes.
    Was the bike insured?
     
  3. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    sorry to hear that.

    If it's any consolation - I've had several bikes nicked : having said that these bikes (used for commuting) were valueless in terms of resale value.
    I would never use any of my racing bikes for commuting purposes.

    Maybe you should consider that as an option - buy a bog standard secondhand bike for as cheaply as possible.
     
  4. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    The police have been and gone. There's a good chance the theft will have been recorded on camera but I guess I'll be lucky if I get it back in one piece.
    This bike wasn't my absolute best. It was about the cheapest, Shimano roadbike you can buy (a bit too basic for Rourkes to touch). It cost me about 345 pounds brand new and I chained it up with a large, thick chain and padlock. It was also left in a public area in broad daylight.
    Seeing as this is the second theft, yes, it's changed my attitude. I'll probably have to buy a new bike for commuting and seeing as I don't buy rubbish, I'll probably lay out about 300 pounds. Apart from that, I've decided to stop being materialistic and sell up my boat which I now figure I'd have to insure more carefully as well as fit alarms and loads of security stuff. I mean, if that gets stolen I'll lose thousands as opposed to hundreds and crime over here is surging.
    So, from now on I'll stick my money in the bank and spend it on holidays and stuff instead.


     
  5. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    No insurance as the chain I used was pretty big and the padlock was up to security standards.
    It hit me at a bad time as I have a lot of money to pay out for the boat license and other expenses so this is kind of like the straw that broke the donkey's back.
    In truth, I can't afford to spend time and money on possessions that some people seem desperate to get hold of. So, the boat will have to go, a new bike will have to be purchased and then a few hundred pounds spent on locks, alarms and anything else I can think of.
    Just wish I could have caught that guy in the act.


     
  6. BottleCage

    BottleCage New Member

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    Ride a Fixed gear the thief most likely not be interested in something with no accessories to sell. Plus riding a fixed gear takes a little bit of practice.
     
  7. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Mate you've had a bad run. I must of been lucky, I've never had a bike stolen.

    I'd go the crap bike route, find a really old racer and use it for commuting. Take the good bike out on the real rides.

    Otherwise immigrate, time to forget the warm beer.
     
  8. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    It's just as well that you didn't catch him as then you would be facing assault charges.
    I like the fixed wheel idea, you never use your low gears anyway so why not? Fixed gear bikes can be built out of cheap bits and still be light because there is just so little of them. You end up with a bike that looks like crap and which most people wouldn't want and couldn't ride....so less likely to get nicked.
     
  9. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    "It's just as well that you didn't catch him as then you would be facing assault charges."

    I've been in that line of work (personal security) so, yes, I'd genuinely like to teach that guy not to steal any more bikes - it's the only message that will sink in sometimes.The first time, I just shrugged it off as one of those things but now I'm not seeing the funny side at all.
    Still, life goes on. The police came round last night and took statements. They're reviewing security camera that were trained around the area of the crime.
    I decided to follow Limerickman's advice and buy a cheap bike for commuting and keep my roadbikes locked in the garage when not in use. I'll also be devising new security systems as well as getting insurance.
    As a replacement roadbike the best bet is the Carrera - my original bike that also comes in red and costs a mere 260 pounds. However, I'm buying a cheap mountain bike today for about 80 pounds for general purposes.
    I've also made up my mind to sell the old boat as I now realise that could be stolen just the same or vandalised and security and insurance for boats is far more complex than for bikes.



     
  10. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    Funnily enough, bike crime makes a big impression on people. Madonna was pretty upset when her bike was stolen in London, even though she could afford to buy several bike shops, let alone bikes.
    The most serious bike theft mistake, moreover, was that of Cassius Clay's. Had it not been for that, he'd never have walked into a boxing gym and been signed up in the club.

     
  11. cheapie

    cheapie New Member

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    what is it about having our bikes stolen that hits us so hard? i had one stolen and i steamed about it for a long time. i hadn't even gotten all that attached to it yet. i'd rather my car, home theater, etc. be stolen than my bikes. do we form more of a bond with them that we do with our other posessions? somehow attach warm feelings to them that are connected to the good times we've had on them? even when i sold my old hardtail MTN bike i was a little sad about it. :confused:
     
  12. BottleCage

    BottleCage New Member

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    My theory is that we spend alot of time on them with no distractions( i.e. radio, cell phone, etc.) Plus the fact that when we put out more effort it responds just like our bodies do. So there is the connection that it is an extension of our body. It is a feeling you do not get when driving a car. The bicycle has become part of us and who we are that is why we get so attached. I have several complete bikes but I just can not part with old frames etc. Unless I know it is going to a good home. ;-)
     
  13. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I'll explain why I was so angry (and still am).
    First of all, I don't drive a vehicle so my bikes are fundamental when it comes to getting around, especially on those days I decide to work on my boat. I need to cover many miles so I need a light bike that will get me there sharpish.
    Also, this is the second roadbike I've had stolen. The first time, I shrugged and put it down to one of those things but this time, I went ballistic.
    I made a start sorting stuff out and bought a cheap mountainbike. Sadly the expensive bar lock that came with it seems to be a washout and has started playing up already (all I can do is try some WD 40 and see it that helps).
    As for the boat, rather than sell I found a way to store it on dry land but I realise I'll have to chip, insure and alarm both bikes and boat.
    If I ever get my hands on the thief I have little doubt it won't be a pleasant meeting but, by the same token, I'm aware stealing and theft in this area seems to be linked to increased poverty, closure of many industries and social problems as a whole.
    I think it needs dealing with at the root cause. As a Chinese friend told me last night, you can't have a society of haves and have-nots without problems of theft or even muggings. When you can't leave a bike chained up in a public area by day, there is a major problem that needs to be addressed.


     
  14. willocrew

    willocrew New Member

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    Hmm not really. As long as Carrera used reasonable force without intent to cause grevious bodily harm.. he'll be validated by a right to defend personal property.

    Actually Carrera, you could have even cracked his skull and get away with it cuz he would have had lock cutters which would have posed as a possible weapon.
     
  15. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    "Actually Carrera, you could have even cracked his skull and get away with it cuz he would have had lock cutters.."

    The ideal would be to wait till the thief is on the bike and just started to pedal off. It would then be a matter of grabbing the rear fork and throwing the bike over so the thief hits the floor hard.
    After that, you just keep him there and have someone call the Police.
    At any rate, I've had no calls from the Police yet so it seems maybe they've not analysed the security tapes. In reality, this case should be a cakewalk. Any city camera should pick up a guy carrying bolt croppers who meets the description we already have.


     
  16. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Who knows where it will take us?...Back in 1987, I was riding my bike around Indonesia. I was staying with a family in a little town called Tenggarong, up the Mahakam River in Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo).
    The house I was staying in was on the edge of the river, and I bought a little long-tail boat to go exploring. There weren't many roads or tracks around, so the bike was, for the time being, relegated to around town service, and I kept it out the front of the house.
    The old man of the family kept telling me to bring the bike inside, but it was always covered in mud, so I didn't. One day I came out to find someone had stolen, not the bike, but the bloody bike seat and seat post. My faith in mankind (and desire to ride long distances) was broken. I spent the day checking every bike I came across, until I realised that someone else just wanted that seat more than I did.
    It was coming time for me to renew my visa, so I told the family I'd be back in a week or so, and headed downriver to catch a cargo boat from Samarinda to Tawau, on the border with Sabah (Malaysian Borneo). The cargo boat changed its destination to Surabaya, Java, and I went along for the ride. I ended up getting across to Singapore to get my visa renewed. I bought myself a Concor saddle, and a seatpost, but I decided to make a diversionary trip up to Thailand before heading back to Kalimantan.
    The diversionary trip took a little longer than expected, as I ended up getting married in Thailand. As far as I am aware, that saddle & seatpost are still sitting in the village in the North of Thailand, and my seatless old Malvern Star is still sitting at a house on the banks of the Mighty Mahakam River in Kalimantan, and my wife and kids are sitting down in Perth, Australia, with bikes of their own...Weird shite!
     
  17. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Glad to hear you've dropped the plan to sell the boat - don't let paranoia rule your life. Is the boat wood? If so, you need to be aware that pulling it out the water for a long time could open it up.
    I have my boat sitting on a mooring in a fairly busy river, a few miles from the sea. It would be very easy for someone to steal it, but very hard for them to do anything with it. Boat thefts (at least where I live) are more likely to be of boats that can be towed by trailer. If your canal boat was taken, couldn't they only go up or down the river / canal? How would they move it?

    Sorry about the bike, Carrera.

    Regards,
    Eoin
     
  18. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I appreciate the support and advice. Let me say this bike theft really hit me hard and I still appear to be in a bad mood about the whole thing.
    Let me give you all a word of advice as well as this is pretty scary:
    When I bought my cheaper mountain bike I was given a free bar lock with it as the shop owner must have felt a bit sorry for me over the original theft. At any rate, the other night I left just the bar-lock secured to a steel fence overnight seeing as locks are heavy to carry about when you're riding.
    Guess what? When I returned the next day the lock itself had been stolen. I confess I haven't got a clue how a bar-lock could be broken into but can only assume the manufacturerers produce the same key for al the devices they sell. That means, the fact I own a key means I could technically open other peoples' locks as well.
    I was franky pretty annoyed cyclists are being led into a false sense of security over these locks (as much use as a wet sponge in a flood, I reckon).
    Therefore, today I purchased a very heavy motorcycle lock. I paid 80 U.S. dollars for the lock but even in spite of that I only intend to chain up the cheaper mountain bikes in public.
    This is also only the beginning of the security measures planned. Next I plan to fit electronic tracking devices inside the frames.

     
  19. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    I guess when I decided to flog the boat I had good reasons for doing so. I figure it isn't the best of investments and I was getting concerned about security as I figure a boat is a far easier prospect to steal than a bike. Unfortunately, boats are far more difficult to insure as well and I didn't fancy paying for a survey to be done just so I can be better insured.
    Still, I decided to keep on with the project and licensing for 6 months seems to be the logical compromise.
    3 days ago I did what I stated I'd do and waded right into the canal with this special wading suit I have. The plan was to then measure the bottom of the hull at the stern and mark the point where my outboard bracket should be bolted on. The plan worked. I was about 3 feet in mud and silt while the water was up to my waist but I remained dry. I took measurements and then attempted to climb back on board. That was the toughest part as I couldn't get back out of the water for some time.
    After that we drilled the holes. Next time I go down, I have to bolt the whole bracket with a large sheet of varnished plywood onto the stern before bolting an inner layer of plywood inside. Once the bracket is secure and strong, the Mariner Outboard can simply be clamped on.
    At that point, the boat should cruise. It hasn't run in many years so I may well feel some satisfaction when it goes.
    After that, I'll start restoring the diesel engine step by step.

     
  20. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Aaaah, messing about in boats. There is nothing quite like it.
    I've got plenty of little nautical jobs planned for when I head home next week. One of the first is to see whether I can hang a hammock from the boom and still clear the engine cover when it is straining with the weight of my lard-arse - I quite fancy bobbing around out there, swinging under the boom. It has a sturdy topping lift, so I shouldn't get any surprises in the night.
    It'll be interesting to see how your boat performs under the outboard. Mine has a full-length keel. It steers beautifully forward, but the rudder has little effect when reversing. It doesn't seem to prop-walk too much, though. I managed to stick the bowsprit between the railings when I got caught by a gust at a jetty a while ago. Provided a little excitement for the old boys who were fishing there. I've noticed that the bowsprit seems to home in on the sides of expensive boats that are sitting on moorings - it's like walking a pit bull terrier past a kitten.
     
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