Carrots and sliced thumbs...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Katra, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. George

    George Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Use a sharp knife and don't chop them with the knife. Try to use a
    >>smooth slicing stroke.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Trust me... I have. ;-)
    > Carrots are so crisp that even with a slicing motion, they tend to "pop"
    > at the bottom of the slice and go flying into the sink. :p
    >



    Don't know what to tell you. Maybe think good thoughts when you are
    doing it? Seriously I seldom have runaway carrot pieces. You just need a
    sharp knife and horizontal slicing motion to slice and not chop the
    carrot. If you have to force it you either have a dull knife or are
    chopping not slicing.




    > The only way that does not happen is if I let the carrots get a bit old
    > and limp, but that's just icky. :p
     


  2. George

    George Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Use a sharp knife and don't chop them with the knife. Try to use a
    >>smooth slicing stroke.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Trust me... I have. ;-)
    > Carrots are so crisp that even with a slicing motion, they tend to "pop"
    > at the bottom of the slice and go flying into the sink. :p
    >



    Don't know what to tell you. Maybe think good thoughts when you are
    doing it? Seriously I seldom have runaway carrot pieces. You just need a
    sharp knife and horizontal slicing motion to slice and not chop the
    carrot. If you have to force it you either have a dull knife or are
    chopping not slicing.




    > The only way that does not happen is if I let the carrots get a bit old
    > and limp, but that's just icky. :p
     
  3. George

    George Guest

    Katra wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Hmmmmmm... ok.
    > I have a large chef's knife that I use.
    > I could always run to the oriental market and get one of those heavy
    > cleavers. <lol>


    Even though they look like cleavers they are actually knives and you
    would wreck the edge if you tried to use it as a cleaver.

    A Chinese knife may work for you. Some people like the extra weight. You
    really have to experiment to find a knife that fits you. Cutting a
    carrot with a sharp knife that fits you should be almost effortless and
    the pieces won't be trying to escape.



    >
    > Sorry about the "alternate identity". I use that identity routinely on
    > another list and forgot to switch my settings back. ;-P
    > That one slips thru from time to time here........
    >
     
  4. George

    George Guest

    Katra wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Hmmmmmm... ok.
    > I have a large chef's knife that I use.
    > I could always run to the oriental market and get one of those heavy
    > cleavers. <lol>


    Even though they look like cleavers they are actually knives and you
    would wreck the edge if you tried to use it as a cleaver.

    A Chinese knife may work for you. Some people like the extra weight. You
    really have to experiment to find a knife that fits you. Cutting a
    carrot with a sharp knife that fits you should be almost effortless and
    the pieces won't be trying to escape.



    >
    > Sorry about the "alternate identity". I use that identity routinely on
    > another list and forgot to switch my settings back. ;-P
    > That one slips thru from time to time here........
    >
     
  5. Katra <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I gave up on chasing chunks of carrots all over the kitchen. I rarely use
    >> anything but baby carrots now.

    >
    >ROFL! I see you know also!
    >When _I_ buy carrots, I also get the packages of milled baby carrots,
    >but when dad gets his SSI check at the beginning of the month, he nearly
    >always comes home with a massive 3 lb. bag of large carrots even when
    >I've asked him not to! He says they are cheaper. <grumble>


    He has a point.

    >> Just lop them in half or thirds, and that's
    >> it. I don't know if that'll help you in your situation, but I've been
    >> figuring out ways of performing various tasks to minimize stress, and this
    >> is one of them.

    >
    >Hehehheh!
    >We think alike it seems. ;-)
    >Trick is to get dad to see it from MY point of view!


    Is he in physical condition to cut them himself? If he does the slicing
    for awhile, he might see baby carrots in a whole new light. :)

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  6. Katra <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I gave up on chasing chunks of carrots all over the kitchen. I rarely use
    >> anything but baby carrots now.

    >
    >ROFL! I see you know also!
    >When _I_ buy carrots, I also get the packages of milled baby carrots,
    >but when dad gets his SSI check at the beginning of the month, he nearly
    >always comes home with a massive 3 lb. bag of large carrots even when
    >I've asked him not to! He says they are cheaper. <grumble>


    He has a point.

    >> Just lop them in half or thirds, and that's
    >> it. I don't know if that'll help you in your situation, but I've been
    >> figuring out ways of performing various tasks to minimize stress, and this
    >> is one of them.

    >
    >Hehehheh!
    >We think alike it seems. ;-)
    >Trick is to get dad to see it from MY point of view!


    Is he in physical condition to cut them himself? If he does the slicing
    for awhile, he might see baby carrots in a whole new light. :)

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  7. Grizzman

    Grizzman Guest

    i have worked in restaurants where, when i was cutting fish i had to
    wear a chain mail glove which protected my hand. any restaurant supply
    house should have em

    Grizzman

    Katra wrote:
    > I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    > Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    > He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >
    > If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    > they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    > and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.
    >
    > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    >
    > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > to slice carrots?
    >
     
  8. Grizzman

    Grizzman Guest

    i have worked in restaurants where, when i was cutting fish i had to
    wear a chain mail glove which protected my hand. any restaurant supply
    house should have em

    Grizzman

    Katra wrote:
    > I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    > Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    > He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >
    > If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    > they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    > and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.
    >
    > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    >
    > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > to slice carrots?
    >
     
  9. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > (Phred) wrote:
    >
    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    >>>Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    >>>He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >>>
    >>>If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >>>they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >>>and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.

    >>
    >>I know what you mean! ;-)
    >>
    >>It's worse if you simply try to cut "down" on the things. Use a
    >>really sharp knife and cut "across" in a slicing motion and you should
    >>get less scatter. (But probably still not *no* scatter. :)
    >>
    >>Cheers, Phred.

    >
    > Finally! Another person that really understands! <lol>
    >
    > I have found that slicing them on a slant helps a lot.


    Forgive me. I don't get it. I can't really estimate how many carrots
    I've cut over the years, but it has to be thousands of pounds - with
    none of this difficulty.

    I teach my cooks to cut with a large (at least 8" long) heavy (at least
    2" wide) knife and rock it. Put the point down on the board with the
    butt of the blade over the carrot and just come down. Gently. If you do
    it hard or if the knife is dull, it won't work right and you get carrots
    with broken cuts.

    Slicing carrots takes needless time and doesn't get you any better
    results compared to the process described above.

    In restaurants, there's no time for these games. Carrots need to be cut
    cleanly and quickly. Rocking the knife grips and cuts the carrot.
    There's no reason to be holding it on the board. Line up three or four
    carrots side by side and cut them all at once. Make sure you have a
    large enough board to do it without cramping your movements.

    Pastorio
     
  10. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > (Phred) wrote:
    >
    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    >>>Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    >>>He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >>>
    >>>If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >>>they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >>>and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.

    >>
    >>I know what you mean! ;-)
    >>
    >>It's worse if you simply try to cut "down" on the things. Use a
    >>really sharp knife and cut "across" in a slicing motion and you should
    >>get less scatter. (But probably still not *no* scatter. :)
    >>
    >>Cheers, Phred.

    >
    > Finally! Another person that really understands! <lol>
    >
    > I have found that slicing them on a slant helps a lot.


    Forgive me. I don't get it. I can't really estimate how many carrots
    I've cut over the years, but it has to be thousands of pounds - with
    none of this difficulty.

    I teach my cooks to cut with a large (at least 8" long) heavy (at least
    2" wide) knife and rock it. Put the point down on the board with the
    butt of the blade over the carrot and just come down. Gently. If you do
    it hard or if the knife is dull, it won't work right and you get carrots
    with broken cuts.

    Slicing carrots takes needless time and doesn't get you any better
    results compared to the process described above.

    In restaurants, there's no time for these games. Carrots need to be cut
    cleanly and quickly. Rocking the knife grips and cuts the carrot.
    There's no reason to be holding it on the board. Line up three or four
    carrots side by side and cut them all at once. Make sure you have a
    large enough board to do it without cramping your movements.

    Pastorio
     
  11. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    >
    > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > to slice carrots?



    Sharpen your knife and get one of these:
    <http://www.kitchenkapers.com/mesh-cutting-glove-small.html>


    For just your thumb,
    <http://tinyurl.com/3qsyt>

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  12. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    >
    > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > to slice carrots?



    Sharpen your knife and get one of these:
    <http://www.kitchenkapers.com/mesh-cutting-glove-small.html>


    For just your thumb,
    <http://tinyurl.com/3qsyt>

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  13. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Wed, 30 Mar 2005 06:50:02 GMT in <KatraMungBean-7F8EC2.00500230032005
    @corp.supernews.com>, [email protected] (Katra) wrote :

    >I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    >Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    >He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >
    >If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.


    I second Bob's advice. Your chef's knife needs to be *really* big. I find
    even an 8" knife is a bit too small. 10" is OK. 12" is better. As everybody
    says, it should be *really* sharp. Get a sharpening stone if you don't want
    to go down to your local cutlers frequently. The rocking motion is
    definitely what you need. Be sure that the carrots are lined up over the
    center part of the blade. If they're near the tip the knife may "push" the
    carrot off the end, and if they're near the bolster the extra thickness can
    send them flying. Really serious popping is almost always the result of a
    dull blade. Essentially you're bludgeoning the carrot with a dull knife,
    and at some point the fibers snap. The basic method has worked for me even
    for whopper carrots (1.5 lbs, about 3" in diameter) If you do several
    carrots at once, alternate the directions they point, pack them together
    like sardines and you'll have better slice control.

    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  14. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Wed, 30 Mar 2005 06:50:02 GMT in <KatraMungBean-7F8EC2.00500230032005
    @corp.supernews.com>, [email protected] (Katra) wrote :

    >I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    >Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    >He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >
    >If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.


    I second Bob's advice. Your chef's knife needs to be *really* big. I find
    even an 8" knife is a bit too small. 10" is OK. 12" is better. As everybody
    says, it should be *really* sharp. Get a sharpening stone if you don't want
    to go down to your local cutlers frequently. The rocking motion is
    definitely what you need. Be sure that the carrots are lined up over the
    center part of the blade. If they're near the tip the knife may "push" the
    carrot off the end, and if they're near the bolster the extra thickness can
    send them flying. Really serious popping is almost always the result of a
    dull blade. Essentially you're bludgeoning the carrot with a dull knife,
    and at some point the fibers snap. The basic method has worked for me even
    for whopper carrots (1.5 lbs, about 3" in diameter) If you do several
    carrots at once, alternate the directions they point, pack them together
    like sardines and you'll have better slice control.

    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  15. Amarantha

    Amarantha Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >> they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >> and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.
    >>

    >
    > I usually cut them in half-moons instead: Cut the carrots lengthwise,
    > then put them flat-side down for the remainder of the cutting. When
    > the crosswise cuts are made, I put the tip of the knife on the board
    > on the other side of the carrot, then move the knife like a pivot,
    > bringing the blade through the carrot. I never have the problem you
    > describe.
    >


    I second that. This is how I do it, and the carrot bits stay where they're
    chopped :)

    K
    --
    nil illegitimi carborundum
     
  16. Amarantha

    Amarantha Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    >> they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    >> and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.
    >>

    >
    > I usually cut them in half-moons instead: Cut the carrots lengthwise,
    > then put them flat-side down for the remainder of the cutting. When
    > the crosswise cuts are made, I put the tip of the knife on the board
    > on the other side of the carrot, then move the knife like a pivot,
    > bringing the blade through the carrot. I never have the problem you
    > describe.
    >


    I second that. This is how I do it, and the carrot bits stay where they're
    chopped :)

    K
    --
    nil illegitimi carborundum
     
  17. On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:56:13 GMT, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    >Go here and look how she is holding the knife with the index finger and the
    >thumb clamping the BLADE not the handle.
    >http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_dm_knife_skills/text/0,,FOOD_19001_23290,00.html


    <snip>

    Cool video, Dimitri. I always enjoy watching cooking technique clips.
    Watching her, as you said, clamp the blade with her fingers instead of
    clamping the handle, it appears she has better control b/c she's
    guiding the working part of the knife. Will give it a try tomorrow
    night while preparing the DH's birthday dinner.

    OTOH, I'll likely stick to my mandoline for stuff like slicing
    carrots. Way faster and more uniform. You can't use it while sipping
    the cooking sherry, however :)

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  18. On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:56:13 GMT, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    >Go here and look how she is holding the knife with the index finger and the
    >thumb clamping the BLADE not the handle.
    >http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_dm_knife_skills/text/0,,FOOD_19001_23290,00.html


    <snip>

    Cool video, Dimitri. I always enjoy watching cooking technique clips.
    Watching her, as you said, clamp the blade with her fingers instead of
    clamping the handle, it appears she has better control b/c she's
    guiding the working part of the knife. Will give it a try tomorrow
    night while preparing the DH's birthday dinner.

    OTOH, I'll likely stick to my mandoline for stuff like slicing
    carrots. Way faster and more uniform. You can't use it while sipping
    the cooking sherry, however :)

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
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