Carrots and sliced thumbs...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Katra, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >
    > >> Go here and look how she is holding the knife with the index finger and
    > >> the
    > >> thumb clamping the BLADE not the handle.
    > >> http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/ck_dm_knife_skills/text/0,,FOOD_19001_23290
    > >> ,00
    > >> .html
    > >>
    > >> As a matter of fact she is cutting carrots and low and behold - NO
    > >> POPPING!
    > >>
    > >> Like I said use a sharp Knife.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Dimitri
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > Hmmmmmm... ok.
    > > I have a large chef's knife that I use.
    > > I could always run to the oriental market and get one of those heavy
    > > cleavers. <lol>

    >
    > I have 2 and they are very useful to work with. If you have an Ikea handy
    > they have some decent ones at very low prices. Please note these are not
    > high quality but for wacking through a bone in Chicken breast they're not
    > bad.


    They have some HUGE heavy cleavers at the oriental market that I
    frequent! They are under $10.00 each too.

    I mostly use a very old chef's knife that belonged to my mom. It's a
    good knife and I can get a good edge on it.

    My biggest problem is probably patience. <lol>
    I tend to get in a hurry in the mornings when I'm preparing brunch!

    >
    > > Sorry about the "alternate identity". I use that identity routinely on
    > > another list and forgot to switch my settings back. ;-P
    > > That one slips thru from time to time here........

    >
    > Not a problem.....
    >
    >
    > Dimitri


    :)


    >
    >

    --
    K.
     


  2. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>Use a sharp knife and don't chop them with the knife. Try to use a
    > >>smooth slicing stroke.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Trust me... I have. ;-)
    > > Carrots are so crisp that even with a slicing motion, they tend to "pop"
    > > at the bottom of the slice and go flying into the sink. :p
    > >

    >
    >
    > Don't know what to tell you. Maybe think good thoughts when you are
    > doing it? Seriously I seldom have runaway carrot pieces. You just need a
    > sharp knife and horizontal slicing motion to slice and not chop the
    > carrot. If you have to force it you either have a dull knife or are
    > chopping not slicing.
    >



    Ah! Ok...
    It might very well be my slicing technique then!

    I'll give it some practice then, thanks for the hint!
    --
    K.
     
  3. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Hmmmmmm... ok.
    > > I have a large chef's knife that I use.
    > > I could always run to the oriental market and get one of those heavy
    > > cleavers. <lol>

    >
    > Even though they look like cleavers they are actually knives and you
    > would wreck the edge if you tried to use it as a cleaver.
    >
    > A Chinese knife may work for you. Some people like the extra weight. You
    > really have to experiment to find a knife that fits you. Cutting a
    > carrot with a sharp knife that fits you should be almost effortless and
    > the pieces won't be trying to escape.
    >



    Believe it or not, my _favorite_ kitchen knife is a large "Eagle's claw"
    brand filleting knife! It is light in weight and I can get a razor edge
    on it! (hence the occasional sliced thumb <lol>) I also have a smaller
    one for tighter jobs.

    I've used that fillet knife for just about everything from skinning,
    gutting, deboning, slicing, etc. It fits my hand just right and keeps an
    edge for a long time...

    Wielding two of them, dad and I can dress out and part out a deer
    together in under 2 hours!
    --
    K.
     
  4. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    > >In article <mkjk4[email protected]>,
    > > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I gave up on chasing chunks of carrots all over the kitchen. I rarely use
    > >> anything but baby carrots now.

    > >
    > >ROFL! I see you know also!
    > >When _I_ buy carrots, I also get the packages of milled baby carrots,
    > >but when dad gets his SSI check at the beginning of the month, he nearly
    > >always comes home with a massive 3 lb. bag of large carrots even when
    > >I've asked him not to! He says they are cheaper. <grumble>

    >
    > He has a point.


    Yeah, true, but he is _not_ a good cook! ;-)
    The kitchen and stove are my territory.....

    >
    > >> Just lop them in half or thirds, and that's
    > >> it. I don't know if that'll help you in your situation, but I've been
    > >> figuring out ways of performing various tasks to minimize stress, and this
    > >> is one of them.

    > >
    > >Hehehheh!
    > >We think alike it seems. ;-)
    > >Trick is to get dad to see it from MY point of view!

    >
    > Is he in physical condition to cut them himself? If he does the slicing
    > for awhile, he might see baby carrots in a whole new light. :)
    >
    > Carol


    <lol>
    I'll just have to try to go grocery shopping with him more often....

    Yeah, he could cut them but...... It's _my_ job!

    He cleans the litter boxes. <G>
    --
    K.
     
  5. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Forgive me. I don't get it. I can't really estimate how many carrots
    > I've cut over the years, but it has to be thousands of pounds - with
    > none of this difficulty.


    Hi Bob! <waves>

    >
    > I teach my cooks to cut with a large (at least 8" long) heavy (at least
    > 2" wide) knife and rock it. Put the point down on the board with the
    > butt of the blade over the carrot and just come down. Gently. If you do
    > it hard or if the knife is dull, it won't work right and you get carrots
    > with broken cuts.


    Ah. So maybe I'm trying to cut too hard and fast?

    >
    > Slicing carrots takes needless time and doesn't get you any better
    > results compared to the process described above.
    >
    > In restaurants, there's no time for these games. Carrots need to be cut
    > cleanly and quickly. Rocking the knife grips and cuts the carrot.
    > There's no reason to be holding it on the board. Line up three or four
    > carrots side by side and cut them all at once. Make sure you have a
    > large enough board to do it without cramping your movements.
    >
    > Pastorio


    Ok, thanks!

    I'll practice more......


    Thanks to everybody for the input!!!

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  6. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    > >
    > > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > > to slice carrots?

    >
    >
    > Sharpen your knife and get one of these:
    > <http://www.kitchenkapers.com/mesh-cutting-glove-small.html>


    Yes, I've seen these...

    >
    >
    > For just your thumb,
    > <http://tinyurl.com/3qsyt>


    Ah! Vetwrap! <lol>

    $3.00 per roll at the feed store.....
    --
    K.
     
  7. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Petey the Wonder Dog <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Far as I can tell, someone wrote:
    > >Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > >to slice carrots?

    >
    > Here's your answer. No more cuts ever. A little pricy, but cheaper than a
    > finger.
    >
    > http://www.mossonline.com/product-exec/product_id/34675/category_id/96




    Oh. Wow......

    I need to get one of those for dad next time we do slaughtering. ;-)
    He is FAR worse about cutting himself than I am!
    --
    K.
     
  8. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Alex Rast) wrote:

    > at Wed, 30 Mar 2005 06:50:02 GMT in <KatraMungBean-7F8EC2.00500230032005
    > @corp.supernews.com>, [email protected] (Katra) wrote :
    >
    > >I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    > >Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    > >He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    > >
    > >If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    > >they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    > >and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.

    >
    > I second Bob's advice. Your chef's knife needs to be *really* big. I find
    > even an 8" knife is a bit too small. 10" is OK. 12" is better. As everybody
    > says, it should be *really* sharp. Get a sharpening stone if you don't want
    > to go down to your local cutlers frequently. The rocking motion is
    > definitely what you need. Be sure that the carrots are lined up over the
    > center part of the blade. If they're near the tip the knife may "push" the
    > carrot off the end, and if they're near the bolster the extra thickness can
    > send them flying. Really serious popping is almost always the result of a
    > dull blade. Essentially you're bludgeoning the carrot with a dull knife,
    > and at some point the fibers snap. The basic method has worked for me even
    > for whopper carrots (1.5 lbs, about 3" in diameter) If you do several
    > carrots at once, alternate the directions they point, pack them together
    > like sardines and you'll have better slice control.


    I'll just have to really try to get the old chef's knife really sharp
    then. It's 10". Then I'll hide it.

    Every time I get the knives sharpened, dad decides to "hone" them metal
    against metal claiming that I don't know what I'm talking about when I
    complain he is dulling them. :-(

    He likes to sharpen knife edges against each other!

    What a crock...

    I really really need a good, quick, in home sharpener that is faster and
    easier than a whet stone or steel.

    What about crock sticks?
    --
    K.
     
  9. Katra wrote:

    > I'll just have to really try to get the old chef's knife really sharp
    > then. It's 10". Then I'll hide it.
    >
    > Every time I get the knives sharpened, dad decides to "hone" them metal
    > against metal claiming that I don't know what I'm talking about when I
    > complain he is dulling them. :-(
    >
    > He likes to sharpen knife edges against each other!
    >
    > What a crock...


    It's roughly equivalent to buffing with a steel. But it needs to be a
    gentle process and the correct angles need to be maintained.

    > I really really need a good, quick, in home sharpener that is faster and
    > easier than a whet stone or steel.
    >
    > What about crock sticks?


    Forget them. Get a ceramic sharpener that looks like a butcher's steel.
    Use it like one and it'll keep your knives in good shape. I also like
    diamond-impregnated steels (about $30) and they're very good for
    resetting the edge of a knife that's somewhat dulled.

    To get a good edge to begin with, use a stone with medium and fine grit
    surfaces. Once you get the good edge and use the ceramic, the knives
    will stay pretty sharp.

    Pastorio
     
  10. Serendipity

    Serendipity Guest

    Katra wrote:

    > I _hate_ slicing fresh carrots!!!
    > Dad likes them a lot tho' so it has to be done.
    > He prefers them in bite sized chunky slices.
    >
    > If I try to slice them on the cutting board with the chef's knife,
    > they are so crisp they tend to want to "pop" off as I slice them
    > and go all over the kitchen! Crispy beasts.


    I do them on the cutting board in groups of 3 or 4. Once in a while
    they pop but it isn't really a problem. Could you possibly used frozen
    coin carrots? That way both of you are happy.
    >
    > So, I generally use a good sharp paring knife and hold them in my hand,
    > slicing them into a bowl by cutting thru them with my thumb as a
    > backstop. The drawback to that is that if my knife is sharp enough,
    > I end up with fine little slices in my thumb. Rarely deep enough to
    > be a real cut (unless the knife is REALLY sharp which has happened a
    > couple of times!) but it's really annoying!!!
    >
    > Is there such a thing as a thumb guard, or is there a better way
    > to slice carrots?
    >
     
  11. Serendipity

    Serendipity Guest

    Grizzman wrote:

    > i have worked in restaurants where, when i was cutting fish i had to
    > wear a chain mail glove which protected my hand. any restaurant supply
    > house should have em


    I need one of these! I bought a new four sided grater. It's been years
    since I used one, prefering either the food processor or small hand held
    graters. Don't you know, the first time using the new one, I found out
    the hard way thumb knuckles go through quite nicely. They take a long
    time to heal though.
     
  12. I was just going to post a thread about baby carrots -- bought some this
    week that tasted ok raw, but used some in soup today, and they tasted
    bitter. But some whole carrots taste bitter to me, too. I try to stick w/
    Bunny Luv brand -- they are always sweet. I've never seen Bunny Luv "baby"
    milled carrots.

    Does anyone have a problem w/ bitter carrots?

    Chris
     
  13. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Monsur Fromage du Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Chris Neidecker" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Katra wrote:
    > > >
    > > > They have some HUGE heavy cleavers at the oriental market that I
    > > > frequent! They are under $10.00 each too.
    > > >

    > >
    > > You don't need a huge heavy one. They may have some smaller ones
    > > that are intended to be veggie cleavers. I have one (got in in
    > > Chinatown in SF, but it's actually made by Dexter/Green River) that
    > > cost me $25, and I love it. I use it for veggies and more. It's my
    > > knife of choice for many/most jobs in the kitchen.
    > >
    > > I have a huge, heavy cleaver as well -- that's for cutting apart
    > > chickens.
    > >
    > > Chris
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I have 3 cleavers a small one I use daily for veggie chopping I got with
    > my wok from the wok shop. A medium size for mild meat use and a horking
    > biggie for the cutting of bones (both from lee valley). I really enjoy
    > the little cleaver and do use it a great deal. The other two get limited
    > use as I live alone and rarely butcher a whole steer or chop up the wiley
    > chicken.


    Heh! I think I get to do at least 1 deer per year... ;-)

    I have about 8 roosters out in the chicken yard I should slaughter, but
    I'm just not not not in the mood at this point in time!

    The feed store has promised to take them off my hands. They go there
    tomorrow.

    No charge.......

    I may hatch some muscovie ducklings for meat this year the way the hens
    are producing eggs at the moment! I need a new incubator tho'.

    BIG meaty ducks!!! Well worth the plucking time. I don't mind doing
    ducks as much now that the poultry list introduced me to the "secret"
    for scalding waterfowl! A bit of dish detergent in the scalding water
    takes care of the oily feather problem beautifully!

    Hey, if anyone here wants some muscovie duck eggs, e-mail me! I am up to
    10 hens and 3 drakes so fertility should be better now. I eat the eggs
    if they are not being put up for hatching.

    Mixed colors, big, beautiful and personable birds!

    And yes, I know how to ship hatching eggs. <G>

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
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