carrying bikes in cars

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by John Riley, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    myself and a 35
    lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    way to go.)

    I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off.

    After a look at the NIAS, I am thinking my choices are only going to get better in the future. There
    is a trend to making the right front seat fold forward until it is flat. Combined with common
    folding rear seats, this makes it possible to accomodate something that is 8 feet long. Like a LWB
    recumbent frame. The Matrix/Vibe and Saturn Vue already have this folding seat. The Vue's sibling,
    the upcoming Chevrolet Equinox will have this feature. The upcoming 2004 Chev Malibu will have it as
    well, but that won't be as interesting as a hatch back version of the Malibu to follow a year or two
    later. If GM does it, I predict others will follow.

    I was anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than a
    Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there with
    wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks more
    cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian dealers.

    Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes, something
    like Cletus did on his Stratus.

    John Riley
     
    Tags:


  2. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    myself and a 35
    lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    way to go.)

    I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off.

    After a look at the NIAS, I am thinking my choices are only going to get better in the future. There
    is a trend to making the right front seat fold forward until it is flat. Combined with common
    folding rear seats, this makes it possible to accomodate something that is 8 feet long. Like a LWB
    recumbent frame. The Matrix/Vibe and Saturn Vue already have this folding seat. The Vue's sibling,
    the upcoming Chevrolet Equinox will have this feature. The upcoming 2004 Chev Malibu will have it as
    well, but that won't be as interesting as a hatch back version of the Malibu to follow a year or two
    later. If GM does it, I predict others will follow.

    I was anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than a
    Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there with
    wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks more
    cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian dealers.

    Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes, something
    like Cletus did on his Stratus.

    John Riley
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike.

    John, You are positively 'Un-American' ;-)

    >
    > I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off. ... I was
    > anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than a
    > Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there with
    > wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks more
    > cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian
    > dealers.

    I have looked at this vehicle too. I think it has possibilities too. However, I have a 2 y.o.
    minivan with 8000 miles on it. It seems unlikely that I will be purchasing one of the first year
    (ore even second year) models when they are eventually put into production.

    > Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes,
    > something like Cletus did on his Stratus.

    For Sale: One slightly used RANS Flip-it stem. No offer refused.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. John Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    > way to go.)
    >
    > John Riley

    Overcrowded parking lots at 4:00 in the afternoon (in my town) are still not getting people out of
    the mindset of the big wide-track line of thinking. I get enjoyment out of hearing all the doomsday
    crying about gas prices jumping in 1 week, Venezualan strikes, scorched earth in Iraq, or major
    concern of the day.

    Off topic, but I get a warped kick out of seeing cars and bikes both mentioned in a posting!

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, CA.
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike.

    John, You are positively 'Un-American' ;-)

    >
    > I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off. ... I was
    > anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than a
    > Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there with
    > wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks more
    > cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian
    > dealers.

    I have looked at this vehicle too. I think it has possibilities too. However, I have a 2 y.o.
    minivan with 8000 miles on it. It seems unlikely that I will be purchasing one of the first year
    (ore even second year) models when they are eventually put into production.

    > Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes,
    > something like Cletus did on his Stratus.

    For Sale: One slightly used RANS Flip-it stem. No offer refused.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. John Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    > way to go.)
    >
    > John Riley

    Overcrowded parking lots at 4:00 in the afternoon (in my town) are still not getting people out of
    the mindset of the big wide-track line of thinking. I get enjoyment out of hearing all the doomsday
    crying about gas prices jumping in 1 week, Venezualan strikes, scorched earth in Iraq, or major
    concern of the day.

    Off topic, but I get a warped kick out of seeing cars and bikes both mentioned in a posting!

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, CA.
     
  7. John:

    Since you are in Canada my suggestion is to find a used VW Transporter Diesel. These front wheel
    drive mid-size vans were sold in Canada from 1992 until 1997. Basically the same body as the VW
    Eurovan but no rear seats or side windows other than an optional window on the sliding door. The
    lack of windows will give your recumbent the highest level of security and the 5-cyclinder 2.4 litre
    diesel engine returns fairly good fuel economy, better than any minivan sold in the US. I don't know
    what it weighs but it is about as long as the long version of a US minivan but narrower and taller.
    It was designed for use in congested European cities. You should be able to find one fairly cheap.
    I've seen them at www.autotrader.ca.

    BTW, how far do you have to transport your recumbent? Does the subway system in Toronto allow bikes
    on board? Here in the San Francisco Bay Area the BART system allows cycles of all types as long as
    they aren't motorised. I've taken tricycles, a Gold Rush and a Double Vision on the BART trains
    though not at the same time. I will only use a motor vehicle if the ride I'm going to doesn't start
    within reasonable riding distance of a BART station and most of my local bike club's rides do start
    near BART stations and for those that don't they highly recommend carpooling.

    Zach Kaplan

    John Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    > way to go.)
    >
    > I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off.
    >
    > After a look at the NIAS, I am thinking my choices are only going to get better in the future.
    > There is a trend to making the right front seat fold forward until it is flat. Combined with
    > common folding rear seats, this makes it possible to accomodate something that is 8 feet long.
    > Like a LWB recumbent frame. The Matrix/Vibe and Saturn Vue already have this folding seat. The
    > Vue's sibling, the upcoming Chevrolet Equinox will have this feature. The upcoming 2004 Chev
    > Malibu will have it as well, but that won't be as interesting as a hatch back version of the
    > Malibu to follow a year or two later. If GM does it, I predict others will follow.
    >
    > I was anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than
    > a Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there
    > with wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks
    > more cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian
    > dealers.
    >
    > Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes,
    > something like Cletus did on his Stratus.
    >
    > John Riley
     
  8. John:

    Since you are in Canada my suggestion is to find a used VW Transporter Diesel. These front wheel
    drive mid-size vans were sold in Canada from 1992 until 1997. Basically the same body as the VW
    Eurovan but no rear seats or side windows other than an optional window on the sliding door. The
    lack of windows will give your recumbent the highest level of security and the 5-cyclinder 2.4 litre
    diesel engine returns fairly good fuel economy, better than any minivan sold in the US. I don't know
    what it weighs but it is about as long as the long version of a US minivan but narrower and taller.
    It was designed for use in congested European cities. You should be able to find one fairly cheap.
    I've seen them at www.autotrader.ca.

    BTW, how far do you have to transport your recumbent? Does the subway system in Toronto allow bikes
    on board? Here in the San Francisco Bay Area the BART system allows cycles of all types as long as
    they aren't motorised. I've taken tricycles, a Gold Rush and a Double Vision on the BART trains
    though not at the same time. I will only use a motor vehicle if the ride I'm going to doesn't start
    within reasonable riding distance of a BART station and most of my local bike club's rides do start
    near BART stations and for those that don't they highly recommend carpooling.

    Zach Kaplan

    John Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > myself and a 35
    > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be the
    > way to go.)
    >
    > I have managed to get a Stratus in the back of a Focus wagon with wheels and seat off.
    >
    > After a look at the NIAS, I am thinking my choices are only going to get better in the future.
    > There is a trend to making the right front seat fold forward until it is flat. Combined with
    > common folding rear seats, this makes it possible to accomodate something that is 8 feet long.
    > Like a LWB recumbent frame. The Matrix/Vibe and Saturn Vue already have this folding seat. The
    > Vue's sibling, the upcoming Chevrolet Equinox will have this feature. The upcoming 2004 Chev
    > Malibu will have it as well, but that won't be as interesting as a hatch back version of the
    > Malibu to follow a year or two later. If GM does it, I predict others will follow.
    >
    > I was anxious to see the Honda Element. This is not as big as a minivan, but certainly bigger than
    > a Focus wagon or a Matrix. But it looks like it might be fairly easy to put a LWB bike in there
    > with wheels and seat on. Unfortunately all the grey plastic inside and out on this vehicle looks
    > more cheap and cheesy than rough and ready. I will give it a closer look when these hit Canadian
    > dealers.
    >
    > Now we just have to convince RANS to make a folding handlebar optional on their LWB bikes,
    > something like Cletus did on his Stratus.
    >
    > John Riley
     
  9. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside the
    >vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan

    Whatever you use, keep in mind the image of that bike hitting you or your passenger in the back of
    the neck at 35-40 mph when you have an otherwise-minor accident.

    I don't know what the solution is, but, IMHO, there's definately a problem there.
    -----------------------
    Pete Cresswell
     
  10. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside the
    >vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan

    Whatever you use, keep in mind the image of that bike hitting you or your passenger in the back of
    the neck at 35-40 mph when you have an otherwise-minor accident.

    I don't know what the solution is, but, IMHO, there's definately a problem there.
    -----------------------
    Pete Cresswell
     
  11. vee oh lah? Isn't that an instrument found in the string section of a Symphony Orchestra? In Canada
    we spell it Voila....vwa lah (as in Shezam or Holy Sh*t).

    As for carrying a bent, why not use a roof rack, bungee the frame to the rack, lay the bent flat on
    foam rubber and wrap a tarp over it.
    -------------------------------------------------------
    "Rich Westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "After ecstasy, laundry." - Zen writing "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:3E23E7A7.2FF11[email protected]...
    > > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > > myself and a 35
    > > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be
    > > the way to go.)
    > >
    >
    > I too drive a small car and always have. Since I've gotten bent I've had
    do
    > make a few accommodations, but not many. The folding rear/passenger seats that you spoke of
    > enabled me to get my RX into my Mazda 626 after removing the seat and stem riser. This fall, I got
    > a new bike (v2) and a new car (Hyundai elantra gt) and still no problem. The v2 fits into the
    > hatchback by putting down the rears seatbacks and putting the passenger seat
    forward,
    > removing the front wheel and the seat from the bike viola! (pronounced
    vee
    > oh lah!) I haven't tried it with the fairing, though. Remember: when you drive an SUV, you ride
    > with Osama.
    >
    > rich
    >
    > --
    > Atheist = knows of and uses Occam's Razor Agnostic = knows of but isn't sure whether to use
    > Occam's Razor Fundamentalist = what's Ockam's erasure?
    >
     
  12. vee oh lah? Isn't that an instrument found in the string section of a Symphony Orchestra? In Canada
    we spell it Voila....vwa lah (as in Shezam or Holy Sh*t).

    As for carrying a bent, why not use a roof rack, bungee the frame to the rack, lay the bent flat on
    foam rubber and wrap a tarp over it.
    -------------------------------------------------------
    "Rich Westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "After ecstasy, laundry." - Zen writing "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    > > the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan to transport
    > > myself and a 35
    > > lb. bike. (My wife is not into this, so it is just me and my bike. Otherwise the van would be
    > > the way to go.)
    > >
    >
    > I too drive a small car and always have. Since I've gotten bent I've had
    do
    > make a few accommodations, but not many. The folding rear/passenger seats that you spoke of
    > enabled me to get my RX into my Mazda 626 after removing the seat and stem riser. This fall, I got
    > a new bike (v2) and a new car (Hyundai elantra gt) and still no problem. The v2 fits into the
    > hatchback by putting down the rears seatbacks and putting the passenger seat
    forward,
    > removing the front wheel and the seat from the bike viola! (pronounced
    vee
    > oh lah!) I haven't tried it with the fairing, though. Remember: when you drive an SUV, you ride
    > with Osama.
    >
    > rich
    >
    > --
    > Atheist = knows of and uses Occam's Razor Agnostic = knows of but isn't sure whether to use
    > Occam's Razor Fundamentalist = what's Ockam's erasure?
    >
     
  13. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Joshua Goldberg wrote:

    > As for carrying a bent, why not use a roof rack, bungee the frame to the rack, lay the bent flat
    > on foam rubber and wrap a tarp over it.

    That sounds more like a sculpture technique than a way to haul a bike. The final touch would be to
    drive down the freeway at 120 kph for awhile and then see what was left of it all.

    Anyway, I have certainly used racks, and may well again, but when road tripping I am not interested
    in having to haul the bike into a hotel every night. For better or worse my willingness for risk
    includes leaving a bike in a locked vehicle overnight, but does not include leaving a bike on a roof
    rack overnight.

    John Riley
     
  14. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Joshua Goldberg wrote:

    > As for carrying a bent, why not use a roof rack, bungee the frame to the rack, lay the bent flat
    > on foam rubber and wrap a tarp over it.

    That sounds more like a sculpture technique than a way to haul a bike. The final touch would be to
    drive down the freeway at 120 kph for awhile and then see what was left of it all.

    Anyway, I have certainly used racks, and may well again, but when road tripping I am not interested
    in having to haul the bike into a hotel every night. For better or worse my willingness for risk
    includes leaving a bike in a locked vehicle overnight, but does not include leaving a bike on a roof
    rack overnight.

    John Riley
     
  15. I saw the Honda element and played with the seating. Problem No. 1. - $4000 over list price!!!
    Problem no. 2. The front olds flat back in the reclining position, but does not fold flat forward
    like the Saturn Vue. (I would hate to place a dirty bike on the front of the seat.) The Saturn
    offers an eight foot interior length but at full list price! (stupid Saturn price fixing).

    Most SUV's don't have much cargo length and don't offer the forward flipping seat. The dumbest thing
    I saw was a Chevy Suburban with a draftmaster rack on the back carrying a Rans Stratus. Let me get
    this straight. A vehicle the size of an ocean liner that would be lucky to get 12 MPG and it can't
    fit a bike inside? Something is wrong with this picture.
     
  16. I saw the Honda element and played with the seating. Problem No. 1. - $4000 over list price!!!
    Problem no. 2. The front olds flat back in the reclining position, but does not fold flat forward
    like the Saturn Vue. (I would hate to place a dirty bike on the front of the seat.) The Saturn
    offers an eight foot interior length but at full list price! (stupid Saturn price fixing).

    Most SUV's don't have much cargo length and don't offer the forward flipping seat. The dumbest thing
    I saw was a Chevy Suburban with a draftmaster rack on the back carrying a Rans Stratus. Let me get
    this straight. A vehicle the size of an ocean liner that would be lucky to get 12 MPG and it can't
    fit a bike inside? Something is wrong with this picture.
     
  17. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 12:16:42 -0600, "Rich Westerman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The v2 fits into the hatchback by putting down the rears seatbacks and putting the passenger seat
    >forward, removing the front wheel and the seat from the

    The Matrix/Vibe marketing materials show an eight-foot step ladder inside the car. I presume my M/L
    Tour Easy will fit, but haven't tried it yet,-- I need to get a scrap of carpet to act as a slide.

    > bike viola! (pronounced vee oh lah!)

    Is that distinguished from the "bike violoncello" ? %^)

    Jon Meinecke ( former violist, prior to gainful employment... )
     
  18. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 12:16:42 -0600, "Rich Westerman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The v2 fits into the hatchback by putting down the rears seatbacks and putting the passenger seat
    >forward, removing the front wheel and the seat from the

    The Matrix/Vibe marketing materials show an eight-foot step ladder inside the car. I presume my M/L
    Tour Easy will fit, but haven't tried it yet,-- I need to get a scrap of carpet to act as a slide.

    > bike viola! (pronounced vee oh lah!)

    Is that distinguished from the "bike violoncello" ? %^)

    Jon Meinecke ( former violist, prior to gainful employment... )
     
  19. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Guest

    I taught my bike how to sleep outside in a rack....and my cat doesn't know the house is hollow...

    On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 22:41:52 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RE/
    >>I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    >>the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan
    >
    >Whatever you use, keep in mind the image of that bike hitting you or your passenger in the back of
    >the neck at 35-40 mph when you have an otherwise-minor accident.
    >
    >I don't know what the solution is, but, IMHO, there's definately a problem there.
    >-----------------------
    >Pete Cresswell
     
  20. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Guest

    I taught my bike how to sleep outside in a rack....and my cat doesn't know the house is hollow...

    On Tue, 14 Jan 2003 22:41:52 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >RE/
    >>I am a big city/small car kind of guy. I also like the security of transporting the bike inside
    >>the vehilce. But I have never been wild about the idea of using a 4000+ lb. minivan
    >
    >Whatever you use, keep in mind the image of that bike hitting you or your passenger in the back of
    >the neck at 35-40 mph when you have an otherwise-minor accident.
    >
    >I don't know what the solution is, but, IMHO, there's definately a problem there.
    >-----------------------
    >Pete Cresswell
     
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