Carrying Stuff On A Road Bike?



gofearstan

New Member
Jun 30, 2015
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I have a road bike, and don't really want to change bikes or buy a second bike just for commuting. I know a hybrid or a tourer would be ideal, but I don't have that. Road bikes aren't set up for carrying gear, but it's ultimately what I need to do. I'll be carrying lunch (2l pack up box), clothes (t shirt, trousers) and whatever other bits and pieces I may need. Occasionally I need to carry tools and stuff for work and don't always like leaving them there. I can keep a fair bit of stuff in my locker which is good news. I'll maximise that and keep my safety boots there. Occasionally though I'll pick up shopping and what not so might need extra storage/carrying capacity. I can minimise this by picking up bits at a time obviously.

I hate cycling with a backpack! Need to keep stuff dry, too.
 

tarverten

New Member
May 26, 2015
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Also might be helpful to know what kind of road bike, figure out what kind of rack system etc.. assuming you don't mind racks.
 

blastguardgear

New Member
May 9, 2015
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How about a trailer? Racks don't play well because of heel clearance/short stays. They aren't bikes designed for loads either...the handling gets squirrelly.
 

shadowsupernature

New Member
Jun 10, 2015
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No offense, but I would rather pack everything in my messenger bag or rolltop bag and have a sweaty back than have everything I own strapped to my bike. Doesn't that affect the handling of it?
 

thepieeatingjay

New Member
Feb 22, 2015
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It depends on the bike and rack system.

I've had a rack on my old Colnago Super for years, mounted with two P-Clips, and an adapter for the triangle in the Campy-Style dropouts.

It can be a trick to get the bags mounted far enough back to prevent heal strike, but not impossible.
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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thepieeatingjay said:
I've had a rack on my old Colnago Super for years, mounted with two P-Clips, and an adapter for the triangle in the Campy-Style dropouts.
I like p-clips too, but only on a metal frame. If the frame is carbon and there are no built-in attachment points, I suggest the largest under-the-saddle bag you can get, or a messenger bag, or a rucksack that fits low and close to the back.
 

Corzhens

Well-Known Member
May 26, 2015
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I had never tried biking with my stuff since I only bike for my exercise. But I remember sometimes I go on an errand to buy something. But with a mountain bike, I don't see anything wrong bringing a backpack. What's not good is having someone ride with you in tandem, that is being discouraged here because of the incidents of injury.
 

John Dennett

New Member
Jul 4, 2015
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If your road bike has rack bosses, then a conventional pannier rack would be the ideal choice. If it doesn't, then there are plenty of luggage options that mount directly to the seatpost.

Topeak make several racks that will fit any bike with a conventional round seatpost. The RX BeamRack is designed to work with Topeak's own RX Trunk Bags, but the Roadie Rack will accept conventional side panniers.

My preferred option would be a bag from the Carradice SQR range. They're not cheap, but are extremely stable and durable. SQR bags are very popular with randonneurs, which should give you an idea of their quality - it it works reliably on 600km rides, it should be more than tough enough for your commute. The SQR range includes a fully waterproofed option to keep your gear dry.
 

DancingLady

Member
Mar 9, 2015
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I think carrying weight low and behind you is better. I see these people in road bikes with backpacks and I think, man, you look top heavy. I would not want to do that. I think you should shop around for side baskets that would fit your bike. I'm sure they are out there somewhere.
 

Lizel

Well-Known Member
Feb 17, 2015
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I only carry low weight products to keep my balance, and usually I put them in a basket.
 

lectraplayer

Member
May 11, 2014
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DancingLady said:
I think carrying weight low and behind you is better. I see these people in road bikes with backpacks and I think, man, you look top heavy. I would not want to do that. I think you should shop around for side baskets that would fit your bike. I'm sure they are out there somewhere.
I've carried car batteries on my rear rack, and it doesn't tear up handling as much as one would think at speed. It is noticeable as you stop, though.

Note: car batteries excede the rating of even strong racks. I would advise against putting a car battery on a bike rack when (and usually is) avoidable.
 

gavinfree

Active Member
Feb 19, 2015
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A side messenger back would work well for transporting small amounts of stuff on each trip, but I agree with you about backpacks being a hassle while riding. Racks and carts are going to make cycling more annoying than you'd think, so I'd stray away from those, at least based upon my own experience with those transportation/storage options.
 

9lines

Member
May 7, 2015
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When the stuff is not heavy, then I can comfortably cycle with it. I can carry my books or some small shopping. I do not like carrying kids on my road bike. I do not carry luggage to practise cycle with it. It is only by chance that I have to carry some luggage.
 

joshposh

Banned
Apr 16, 2015
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I just use a back pack. Nothing special. Just keep it simple and nothing that will hinder your steering capabilities.
 

Damien Lee

Well-Known Member
May 16, 2015
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My general policy is, if it doesn't fit in my back pack then I simply don't take it with me. From my personal experience, carrying large or unwieldy objects on a bicycle is a huge no-no. It makes cycling a chore and sometimes very dangerous.
 
I commute regularly and need to carry a lot of stuff-

work clothes
Lunch
thermos of milk
wallet
Glasses
phone
keys
laptop
work materials
foul weather gear
tire repair stuff

On my traditional road bike, I have a rear rack with a top bag/integrated pannier system by trek. I have no problem getting most of the stuff in that setup most of the time. No problems with weight and sometimes I have had a lot of weight back there too.

When I need more carrying capacity, I go to my recumbent which has a larger top bag and a larger set of panniers with a couple exterior pockets. In addition, I have a couple of small bags attached to the back of the seat whereas I can carry almost double what I can carry on the road bike.

I find that a couple cloth shopping bags are invaluable for transporting my stuff from home to garage and also from bike rack to cubicle.

regards,
Cranky
 

ZXD22

Active Member
Mar 21, 2015
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USA, MA, Cape Cod
If I am going very long distance, I would bring a backpack with my lunch, extra drinks, and snacks. I have a small pouch full of tire replacing tools and such under the taillight. Other than that its all ride!
 

chrislee99777

Member
Feb 22, 2016
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It depends on your bike's situation and your commuting rate.The high speed of road bike make stuff you carried easily to throw out.If you can make sure fixed stuff well.Maybe road bike not will be a problem.