cassette setup custom

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by G.Daniels, Jan 29, 2004.

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  1. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    I'm adding a 34T sprocket to a seven speed cassette fit to a 9/8 speed deore lx hub. the cassette
    without the extra sproket wiggles a bit when the lockring is tightened down. The cassette is
    backed onto two worn gears for a spacer. question is: is the wiggle built in or desirable as the
    wiggle allows chain takeup and built in chain line adjustment? when the extra sprocket goes on the
    back or the entire group of sprockets on the original cassette setup are undone and then placed in
    custom locations then is a cassette wiggle on the hub body ok or should the sprockets be snug
    under the lockring?
     
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  2. Dvt

    Dvt Guest

    g.daniels wrote:
    > I'm adding a 34T sprocket to a seven speed cassette fit to a 9/8 speed deore lx hub.
    ...
    > should the sprockets be snug under the lockring?

    Yes.

    I put together a cassette once without the required spacer. The resulting noise was unpleasant. I
    suspect that long-term use with a loose cassette might chew up the splines on the freehub body, but
    I didn't leave it that way long enough to find out for sure.

    Dave dvt at psu dot edu
     
  3. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 29 Jan 2004 09:19:03 -0800, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    >I'm adding a 34T sprocket to a seven speed cassette fit to a 9/8 speed deore lx hub. the cassette
    >without the extra sproket wiggles a bit when the lockring is tightened down. The cassette is backed
    >onto two worn gears for a spacer. question is: is the wiggle built in or desirable as the wiggle
    >allows chain takeup and built in chain line adjustment? when the extra sprocket goes on the back or
    >the entire group of sprockets on the original cassette setup are undone and then placed in custom
    >locations then is a cassette wiggle on the hub body ok or should the sprockets be snug under the
    >lockring?

    You need a 4.5 mm spacer. I think that 2 cogs are only 3.6 or 3.8 mm. You can add a 1 mm freewheel
    spacer between your 2 cogs. The cassette needs to be tight.
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 29 Jan 2004 09:19:03 -0800, [email protected] (g.daniels) may have
    said:

    >I'm adding a 34T sprocket to a seven speed cassette fit to a 9/8 speed deore lx hub. the cassette
    >without the extra sproket wiggles a bit when the lockring is tightened down. The cassette is backed
    >onto two worn gears for a spacer.

    Probably not thick enough. There is a specific spacer for this task, if I am not mistaken.

    >question is: is the wiggle built in or desirable as the wiggle allows chain takeup and built in
    >chain line adjustment?

    No.

    >when the extra sprocket goes on the back or the entire group of sprockets on the original cassette
    >setup are undone and then placed in custom locations then is a cassette wiggle on the hub body ok
    >or should the sprockets be snug under the lockring?

    They should be snug.

    The spacer thickness that's needed is 4.5mm; if you can't find one locally, it's available online
    from a number of sources including:

    http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=49&SKU=FW8400

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    ok. the cassette mounted between lockring should be snug against the spoke protector or back there.
    WHYWHYWHY?? where did this info arrive from?? my cassette jiggle mmmmm i'll guess 1/100">.19mm wud
    take up the chain better than a fixed sprocket?? or release the chain to the next sprocket and
    reduce errors in chain line adjustments: a bit of angle back there produces some inboard outboard
    distance after a leg up to the CR?? so far i have 4-500 miles on this jiggle without any problem and
    as reported previously am getting excellent wear. haven't measured the gears. as soon as the aus.
    get their stuff. butbubtbut this is a deep thought engineering question or a senic wonder for
    someone probabley asian or michigonian whose built a cluster viewer and spent some time working it
    to see if MY ASSUMPTION is actually real or just another flat earth fiction where's J.Brandt??
     
  6. Dvt

    Dvt Guest

    g.daniels wrote:
    > so far i have 4-500 miles on this jiggle without any problem and as reported previously am getting
    > excellent wear.

    I think it would be interesting to remove the cassette and examine the splines on the freehub. As I
    said earlier, I suspect your little jiggle might cause some ugliness in those splines. You could
    prove or disprove the theory...

    Dave dvt at psu dot edu
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 30 Jan 2004 08:54:48 -0800, [email protected] (g.daniels) may have
    said:

    >ok. the cassette mounted between lockring should be snug against the spoke protector or back there.
    >WHYWHYWHY?? where did this info arrive from??

    There is no "why" given. Manufacturers seldom say why. There is just "is".

    >my cassette jiggle mmmmm i'll guess 1/100">.19mm wud take up the chain better than a fixed
    >sprocket?? or release the chain to the next sprocket and reduce errors in chain line adjustments:
    >a bit of angle back there produces some inboard outboard distance after a leg up to the CR?? so
    >far i have 4-500 miles on this jiggle without any problem and as reported previously am getting
    >excellent wear.

    Yeah, but motion in the cassette on the hub is supposed to be as near zero as having the lockring
    under the right tension can get it; let it wear the splines on the freehub and sprockets, and things
    will hurt later.

    >haven't measured the gears. as soon as the aus. get their stuff. butbubtbut this is a deep thought
    >engineering question or a senic wonder for someone probabley asian or michigonian whose built a
    >cluster viewer and spent some time working it to see if MY ASSUMPTION is actually real or just
    >another flat earth fiction

    Result is likely to be the same as running with the cassette loose for a long time; wallowishness
    makes shifts uncertain, and then it's not correctable anymore without new toys. Sloppy cassette can
    also make noise, but maybe the discman covers it up?

    >where's J.Brandt??

    Look west.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  8. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    G? Daniels writes:

    >> OK. The cassette mounted between lockring should be snug against the spoke protector or
    >> back there.

    > WHYWHYWHY?? Where did this info arrive from??

    Because if the sprockets are free to wiggle around, as they certainly will with the chain pulling at
    least slightly off axis, the sprocket being ridden will skew round and round on the freehub and
    grind grooves at the pressure faces. This doesn't matter if you can listen to the squeak of the
    squirm when things get dry but it will cut grooves and mash the splines on the inside of the
    sprockets.

    > My cassette jiggle mmmmm I'll guess 1/100">0.19mm wud take up the chain better than a fixed
    > sprocket?? or release the chain to the next sprocket and reduce errors in chain line adjustments:
    > a bit of angle back there produces some inboard outboard distance after a leg up to the CR??

    It will have no effect on chain running if you don't shift from one to the other and they are not
    closely located. Just stick a spacer in there and tighten up the sprocket stack and be done with it.
    It doesn't matter how many there are as long as they fit on there and can be tightened so they don't
    wobble squirm. This reminds me of folks who don't mind that their front door squeaks every time they
    move it and rouge is visible in the hinges. Some folks there are that cannot feel the pain of a
    mistreated machine.

    > So far I have 4-500 miles on this jiggle without any problem and as reported previously am getting
    > excellent wear.

    What you mean is that the bicycle still moves. I know people who have a couple of broken spokes and
    ask why they should fix the wheel, it still works.

    > Haven't measured the gears. As soon as the aus. Get their stuff. Butbubtbut this is a deep thought
    > engineering question or a senic wonder for someone probabley asian or michigonian whose built a
    > cluster viewer and spent some time working it to see if MY ASSUMPTION is actually real or just
    > another flat earth fiction.

    I recall people of your persuasion riding to school with the kick stand CLANKING on the crank
    with every revolution and saw no need to fix it. You, as they, can ride another few hundred miles
    as you are.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    g.daniels wrote:

    > ok. the cassette mounted between lockring should be snug against the spoke protector or back
    > there. WHYWHYWHY?? where did this info arrive from?? my cassette jiggle mmmmm i'll guess
    > 1/100">.19mm wud take up the chain better than a fixed sprocket?? or release the chain to the next
    > sprocket and reduce errors in chain line adjustments: a bit of angle back there produces some
    > inboard outboard distance after a leg up to the CR?? so far i have 4-500 miles on this jiggle
    > without any problem and as reported previously am getting excellent wear. haven't measured the
    > gears. as soon as the aus. get their stuff. butbubtbut this is a deep thought engineering question
    > or a senic wonder for someone probabley asian or michigonian whose built a cluster viewer and
    > spent some time working it to see if MY ASSUMPTION is actually real or just another flat earth
    > fiction where's J.Brandt??

    I think that possibly you may have replaced a 12-start or a 13-start cassette with a new one
    starting at eleven teeth. If that is true, then:

    Remove the eleven. Look inside at the splines. Notice how they only broached halfway through?

    That's why you need a spacer behind low gear when you put an "IG" ( eleven start) cassette on an
    "HG" ( 12 start) body. The IG cassette body is smaller overall and less common.

    Is that what you've been writing about all week?

    I thought at first that you were setting up a single speed on a seven cassette body and that's how I
    replied a few days ago. (your subject was 'single' something).

    If I am still misunderstanding you, perhaps you might write again and straighten me out. I'm
    trying here. . .
    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 22:23:56 -0600, A Muzi <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >If I am still misunderstanding you, perhaps you might write again and straighten me out. I'm trying
    >here. . .

    How would his writing again help you to understand him? Wouldn't that just make it worse?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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