Cassette VS freewheels

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Wayne T, Feb 21, 2003.

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  1. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html

    The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about Phil Wood Freewheel hubs, but
    beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they admit that they have given up on
    obtaining 5 and 6 speed freewheels, they still can get Sun Race for 7 speeds.

    They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking. (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special chain
    tool to break the chain. You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a cassette
    wheel which is more susceptible to failure. Freewheel hub is much cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil
    Wood cassette hubs are very expensive. Cassette hubs have the pawls, springs, and other parts that
    eventually wear out. When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the
    freewheel ($20). When the freewheeling mechanism wears out in a cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood)
    you have to replace the hub (or if it's a Phil you can get it serviced)

    Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it does give more gears, is a step
    down. Makes me think it would be better to get a bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally, do
    these freewheels fit the old 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a lot
    of expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?
     
    Tags:


  2. Wayne T wrote:

    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html
    >
    > The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about Phil Wood Freewheel hubs,
    > but beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they admit that they have given
    > up on obtaining 5 and 6 speed freewheels, they still can get Sun Race for 7 speeds.
    >
    > They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    > stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking.

    Nobody goes touring with 10-speed, and there is very little difference in 7-8 or 9 speed chains. All
    have to be assembled with care, and no chain likes it to be shifted under extreme loads. Sram chains
    are better in this respect as Shimano

    > (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special chain tool to break the

    > chain.

    ???so what, a small park works fine

    > You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a cassette wheel which is more
    > susceptible to failure.

    the large cog on a cassette is usually closer to the flange than with a freewheel, which makes a
    stronger wheel if you rn the same number of gears.

    > Freewheel hub is much cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil Wood cassette hubs are very expensive.
    > Cassette hubs have the pawls, springs, and other parts that eventually wear out. When the
    > freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel ($20). When the
    > freewheeling mechanism wears out in a cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to replace the
    > hub (or if it's a Phil you can get it serviced)

    a new freehub for a shimano doesn't cost the earth and is easily fitted. And with a cassette there
    is no need to invest in a hub with an extra strong axle. A simple cassette hub works fine.

    > Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it does give more gears, is a
    > step down. Makes me think it would be better to get a bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally,
    > do these freewheels fit the old 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a
    > lot of expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?

    removing the cassette on the road or in the shop is also much easier than trying to get that [email protected]#$%
    freewheel unstuck. /Marten
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html
    >
    > The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about
    Phil
    > Wood Freewheel hubs, but beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they
    > admit that they have given up on obtaining 5 and 6 speed freewheels, they still can get Sun
    > Race for 7 speeds.
    >
    > They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    > stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking. (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special
    > chain tool to break the chain. You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a
    > cassette wheel which is more susceptible to failure. Freewheel hub is
    much
    > cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil Wood cassette hubs are very expensive. Cassette hubs have the
    > pawls, springs, and other parts that eventually
    wear
    > out. When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel
    > ($20). When the freewheeling mechanism wears out in
    a
    > cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to replace the hub (or if it's
    a
    > Phil you can get it serviced)
    >
    > Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it does give more gears, is a
    > step down. Makes me think it would be better to get
    a
    > bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally, do these freewheels fit the
    old
    > 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a lot
    of
    > expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?
    >
    In all of my years of riding both FW and cassette hubs, I've never broken a chain spontaneously.
    Usually there was some other factor involved (like sticks). The chain argument is bunk.

    Cassettes support the axle better because the bearings are outboard on the drive side. A FW hub's
    drive-side bearings are inboard where the flange is, leaving several cm of axle sticking out. While
    I've never bent an axle, I also haven't been out doing any loaded tours.

    Any more, you're going to find that 99% of the shops out there are going to stock
    cassettes/equipment. Unless you happen on a retro-grouch shop, most of the employees won't know what
    to do with a FW. Or maybe you'll get one that is going to have a field day unloading all their old
    stuff on you!

    If you already own all the stuff for FW hubs, upgrading to 8s or 9s is going to be an undertaking.
    If you are building a new bike from scratch, now is the perfect time to join the late 90s... Quality
    8s components are getting harder and harder to find as Campy and Shimano have both gone 9s and 10s.
    Swap meets like the one on the 29th at the San Diego velodrome are probably your best bet for
    finding older cassette parts.

    Mike "just go with the flow" Shaw (like that Sheldon?)
     
  4. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    I called Rivendell about freewheels. They didn't have any but the Sunrace 7 speeds, but recommended
    that I check the loosescrews.com web site. They had 14-34 Shimano HG 6 speeds for $21. Also, you can
    get them custom built Shimano Uniglide 6 speeds for around $45.

    Hmm, you don't suppose that I would be making a mistake converting to cassette instead of ordering a
    bunch of the freewheels? Certainly would be a lot cheaper.

    Comments pleeeease.

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html
    >
    > The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about
    Phil
    > Wood Freewheel hubs, but beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they
    > admit that they have given up on obtaining 5 and 6 speed freewheels, they still can get Sun
    > Race for 7 speeds.
    >
    > They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    > stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking. (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special
    > chain tool to break the chain. You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a
    > cassette wheel which is more susceptible to failure. Freewheel hub is
    much
    > cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil Wood cassette hubs are very expensive. Cassette hubs have the
    > pawls, springs, and other parts that eventually
    wear
    > out. When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel
    > ($20). When the freewheeling mechanism wears out in
    a
    > cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to replace the hub (or if it's
    a
    > Phil you can get it serviced)
    >
    > Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it does give more gears, is a
    > step down. Makes me think it would be better to get
    a
    > bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally, do these freewheels fit the
    old
    > 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a lot
    of
    > expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?
     
  5. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "marten gerritsen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Wayne T wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html
    > >
    > > The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about
    Phil
    > > Wood Freewheel hubs, but beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they admit
    > > that they have given up on obtaining 5 and
    6
    > > speed freewheels, they still can get Sun Race for 7 speeds.
    > >
    > > They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    > > stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking.
    >
    > Nobody goes touring with 10-speed, and there is very little difference in
    7-8 or
    > 9 speed chains. All have to be assembled with care, and no chain likes it
    to be
    > shifted under extreme loads. Sram chains are better in this respect as
    Shimano

    Then, you make a good point because when I have gone out to buy a chain for my current bike, they
    sell me an 8 speed. However, isn't a 9 speed narrower and maybe less sturdy?
    >
    > > (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special chain tool to break
    the
    >
    > > chain.
    >
    > ???so what, a small park works fine

    OK, that doesn't seem like any problem at all.
    >
    >
    > > You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a cassette wheel which is more
    > > susceptible to failure.
    >
    > the large cog on a cassette is usually closer to the flange than with a freewheel, which makes a
    > stronger wheel if you rn the same number of
    gears.

    My free wheel is 6 and the cassette I would go to is 9. Would that mean a weaker wheel?
    >
    >
    > > Freewheel hub is much cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil Wood cassette hubs are very
    expensive.
    > > Cassette hubs have the pawls, springs, and other parts that eventually
    wear
    > > out. When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel
    > > ($20). When the freewheeling mechanism wears out
    in a
    > > cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to replace the hub (or if
    it's a
    > > Phil you can get it serviced)
    >
    > a new freehub for a shimano doesn't cost the earth and is easily fitted.
    And
    > with a cassette there is no need to invest in a hub with an extra strong
    axle. A
    > simple cassette hub works fine.

    So not the problem Rivendell is making it out to be? Except if you want to go to a Phil Wood
    cassette hub, then instead of 113, it would cost around
    300. Groan!
    >
    > > Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it
    does
    > > give more gears, is a step down. Makes me think it would be better to
    get a
    > > bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally, do these freewheels fit the
    old
    > > 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a lot
    of
    > > expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?
    >
    > removing the cassette on the road or in the shop is also much easier than
    trying
    > to get that [email protected]#$% freewheel unstuck.

    Tell me about it. I have cursed out many a freewheel I've tried to loosen with an adjustable wrench
    since I don't have a bench with a vice.

    Sigh! Might be expensive, but I may just have to give in and convert over to a cassette.
    > /Marten
    >
     
  6. Pixelbrainz

    Pixelbrainz Guest

    > snipped<

    > Tell me about it. I have cursed out many a freewheel I've tried to loosen with an adjustable
    > wrench since I don't have a bench with a vice.
    >
    > Sigh! Might be expensive, but I may just have to give in and convert over to a cassette.
    > > /Marten

    The best thing I ever found for getting a freewheel off without a vise is one of those things that
    looks like a big aluminum tooth, I think it might be called a pocket vise. About $10 bucks or so.
    Good thing to have on a tour; doesn't weigh much and works on any guardrail.

    L8tr PB
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Wayne T
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >When the freewheeling mechanism wears out in a cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to
    >replace the hub (or if it's a Phil you can get it serviced)

    Complete Campagnolo freehub assemblies are readily available, and Campy small part availability
    is good too.

    --
    <a href="http://www.poohsticks.org/drew/">Home Page</a> The Congress shall assemble at least once in
    every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law
    appoint a different Day.
     
  8. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/wheels/18033.html
    > >
    > > The above web site is from Rivendell. Initially they are talking about
    > Phil
    > > Wood Freewheel hubs, but beginning on the 3rd paragraph it asks Why Freewheel? Though they admit
    > > that they have given up on obtaining 5 and
    6
    > > speed freewheels, they still can get Sun Race for 7 speeds.
    > >
    > > They like freewheels because 7 cogs are enough. The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of
    > > stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking. (Anyone have that experience?). You nee a special
    > > chain tool to break
    the
    > > chain. You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a cassette wheel which is
    > > more susceptible to failure. Freewheel hub is
    > much
    > > cheaper than a cassette hub. Phil Wood cassette hubs are very
    expensive.
    > > Cassette hubs have the pawls, springs, and other parts that eventually
    > wear
    > > out. When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel
    > > ($20). When the freewheeling mechanism wears out
    in
    > a
    > > cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to replace the hub (or if
    it's
    > a
    > > Phil you can get it serviced)
    > >
    > > Needless to say that is distressing. Sound like cassette, though it
    does
    > > give more gears, is a step down. Makes me think it would be better to
    get
    > a
    > > bunch of Sun Race freewheels. Incidentally, do these freewheels fit the
    > old
    > > 125mm spacing? Also, are they decent freewheels? Sure would save a lot
    > of
    > > expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?
    > >
    > In all of my years of riding both FW and cassette hubs, I've never broken
    a
    > chain spontaneously. Usually there was some other factor involved (like sticks). The chain
    > argument is bunk.
    >
    > Cassettes support the axle better because the bearings are outboard on the drive side. A FW hub's
    > drive-side bearings are inboard where the flange
    is,
    > leaving several cm of axle sticking out. While I've never bent an axle, I also haven't been out
    > doing any loaded tours.
    >
    > Any more, you're going to find that 99% of the shops out there are going
    to
    > stock cassettes/equipment. Unless you happen on a retro-grouch shop, most of the employees won't
    > know what to do with a FW. Or maybe you'll get one that is going to have a field day unloading all
    > their old stuff on you!

    Yeah, you are confirming what I been thinking all along. I'm fighting a losing battle. Might as well
    give in and convert.
    >
    > If you already own all the stuff for FW hubs, upgrading to 8s or 9s is
    going
    > to be an undertaking. If you are building a new bike from scratch, now is the perfect time to join
    > the late 90s... Quality 8s components are
    getting
    > harder and harder to find as Campy and Shimano have both gone 9s and 10s.

    Hold everything. Maybe I would be better off sticking to freewheels as long as I can. If 8s
    components are getting harder and harder find, how long before the samething happens to 9s
    components? They may soon be obsoleted by 10s or something else new. Then I will be back where I
    started with with the freewheels.

    > Swap meets like the one on the 29th at the San Diego velodrome are
    probably
    > your best bet for finding older cassette parts.
    >
    > Mike "just go with the flow" Shaw (like that Sheldon?)
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > snipped<
    >
    > > Tell me about it. I have cursed out many a freewheel I've tried to
    loosen
    > > with an adjustable wrench since I don't have a bench with a vice.
    > >
    > > Sigh! Might be expensive, but I may just have to give in and convert
    over
    > > to a cassette.
    > > > /Marten

    "pixelbrainz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The best thing I ever found for getting a freewheel off without a vise is one of those things that
    > looks like a big aluminum tooth, I think it might be called a pocket vise. About $10 bucks or so.
    > Good thing to have on a tour; doesn't weigh much and works on any guardrail.

    That's the Pocket Pro freewheel tool holder, patented by my very good friend Angel Rodriguez. No
    longer in production.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  10. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "pixelbrainz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> > snipped<[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> > Tell me about it. I have cursed out many a freewheel I've tried to[/q2]
    loosen
    [q2]> > with an adjustable wrench since I don't have a bench with a vice.[/q2]
    [q2]> >[/q2]
    [q2]> > Sigh! Might be expensive, but I may just have to give in and convert[/q2]
    over
    [q2]> > to a cassette.[/q2]
    [q3]> > > /Marten[/q3]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> The best thing I ever found for getting a freewheel off without a vise is one of those things that[/q1]
    [q1]> looks like a big aluminum tooth, I think it might be called a pocket vise.[/q1]

    Not sure what it is, but I will try to find one. Thanks.

    About $10 bucks or so. Good thing to have on a
    [q1]> tour; doesn't weigh much and works on any guardrail.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> L8tr PB[/q1]
     
  11. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Hold everything. Maybe I would be better off sticking to freewheels as
    long
    > >as I can.
    >
    > >If 8s components are getting harder and harder find, how long before the samething happens to 9s
    > >components? They may soon be
    obsoleted
    > >by 10s or something else new. Then I will be back where I started with
    with
    > >the freewheels.
    >
    > Shimano Freehubs are readily available in 7 speed and 8-9 speed. Realize Shimano is still make
    > zillions of 7 speed cassette bikes and of course 8-9 speed freehubs are the same.
    >
    > But regardless of what Rivendell says, Freehub style hubs are stronger
    than
    > freewheel designs because the length of the unsupported axle in the
    freehub is
    > much less. Phil Woods hubs seem to be an exception to this but they are expensive and have no
    > advantage over the cassette design.
    >
    > Cassettes are also nice because you can custom tailor them, choosing the
    cogs
    > you want. I recently built a 17-11 8 speed straight block for my TT bike.
    Try
    > to do that with a freewheel. Of course this is really an advantage when
    using
    > 7 speed equipment because it makes it easier to optimize you choice of
    cogs.
    >
    > I am not one to jump on every new bandwagon, I try to evaluate changes in
    the
    > technology from an objective point of view. I have both cassette and
    freewheel
    > hubs and I have plenty of cogs for both. Cassette hubs are a definite step
    up
    > from freewheel hubs.

    Ok, thanks. Have you experienced any failures with the freehubs where you had to replace the entire
    hub, or is that also false info?
    >
    > Jon Isaacs
     
  12. wayne-<< Though they admit that they have given up on obtaining 5 and 6 speed freewheels, they still
    can get Sun Race for 7 speeds.

    5 and 6s freewheels are not hard to find-

    << The chain is stronger. They have heard a lot of stories about 9 & 10 speed chains breaking

    Maybe they shouldn't believe everything they 'hear' and either ask bike shops and people that
    actually deal with this stuff or see for themselves..9 and 10s chains don't 'break' unless they were
    installed incorrectly.

    << You nee a special chain tool to break the chain.

    Nope, any chaintool can 'break' a 9 or 10s chain.

    << You can build stronger wheels with a freewheel as opposed to a cassette wheel which is more
    susceptible to failure.

    Horseshit-altho i agree that 120/6mm wheels are stronger than 130mm casette ones, any decent
    wheelbuilder can build a reliable 8/9/10s wheel...We have been doing it for over a decade. 130mm
    casette wheels are NOT 'susceptible to failure', what crappola.

    << Freewheel hub is much cheaper than a cassette hub ..

    Cheaper sometimes, sometimes not-a Phill freewheel hub with a NOS DA freewheel is a lot more than
    say a Campagnolo or shimano hub and casette.

    << When the freewheeling mechanism in a freewheel wears out, you just replace the freewheel ($20)

    And expect this to happen a lot with a 20 buck freewheel...

    << When the freewheeling mechanism wears out in a cassette hub (rare in a Phil Wood) you have to
    replace the hub (or if it's a Phil you can get it serviced)

    ALL cassette hubs I know of have servicable and replaceable freehub bodies..where do they get
    this stuff???

    << Sure would save a lot of expensive getting new hubs, shifters, cranks and cassette. Comments?

    You can use many casette hubs with older components, just see a bike shop that understands this
    stuf...seemingly not Rivendell...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Ok, thanks. Have you experienced any failures with the freehubs where
    you
    > >had to replace the entire hub, or is that also false info?
    >
    > My experience as 230 lb masher, thrasher has been that I have had to
    replace a
    > few freehub assemblies but I have never had a problem with other failures.

    What exactly does replacing a freehub assembly involve? I take it that you don't have to replace the
    whole hub. Is that correct? If so, how much do hub assemblies cost?
    >
    > Of course, there are plenty of things like bearings and hub flanges that
    can
    > fail on both a free hub or a freewheel hub, but I have not had them happen
    to
    > cassette hubs. I have bent axles on more than a few freewheel rear hubs
    in my
    > day, 5 and 6 speeders too, that is why I stick to cassette hubs except in situations where they
    > are inappropriate for vintage reasons.
    >
    > I think Rivendell has some good thoughts, but they are unlikely to embrace
    new
    > technology when it is clearly superior.
    >
    > Myself, I try to question both new and old technology and achieve a
    balance
    > that provides functional, reliable and enjoyable bikes. I see no need to
    go to
    > 9 speed or 10 speed because I see no need for skinny chains that cost real money and I am
    > confident I can choose my cogs with sufficient skill that
    an
    > additional cog would not be an advantage. 7 and 8 speed index shifting is
    more
    > than enough.

    I take it that you are not concerned that 8 speed cassettes are going to end up being scarce because
    manufacturers are going to stop making them like freewheels.

    I also like dual pivot brakes but think that the switch to short
    > reach brakes is stupid, stupid, stupid. They just limit tire choices
    without
    > any real advantage to the vast majority of riders.
    >
    > Cassette Hubs: A real improvement.
    >
    > jon isaacs
     
  14. Wayne T asked:

    > What exactly does replacing a freehub assembly involve? I take it that you don't have to replace
    > the whole hub. Is that correct?

    Yes. My article on Shimano Cassette Hubs explains this in detail.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

    > If so, how much do hub assemblies cost?

    Not much. See my commercial Shimano Cassette page:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/k7.html

    Sheldon "Kah-Sept" Brown +------------------------------------------------------+
    | What signifies knowing the names if you know not | the natures of things? -- Benjamin Franklin |
    +------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  15. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    First of all, thank you for clearing up a lot of questions I had in this and your previous
    2 messages.

    I am resigned to convert over to cassette. Just hope 9 speed doesn't go obsolete in only 10 years in
    2013. That isn't all that long a time period. But if things go as they have with freewheels, then 9
    speed cassettes should still be available a decade afterwards.

    I take it that you do not feel that a 9 speed chain would be a problem under situations of
    heavy touring.

    Your point of a 20 dollar freewheel being doubtful of a long life seems to make sense. However, the
    Shimano HG 6 speeds are selling at loosescrews.com for $21. The most important point though, is that
    all cassette hubs have serviceable and replaceable freehubs. How much would one cost for a Ultegra
    or DA and is it something I can do or would I have to get a bike store to do it? BTW, how often do
    freehubs fail? Any more frequently than freewheels?

    You said that I can use cassette hubs with older components. However, I understand that you can't
    use it with an existing freewheel hub and I get the impression that a 9 speed can't be used with
    older crank sets because they have wider spacing and I assume that the chain could get stuck between
    this spacing. Further, I understand that I would have to replace my current barend shifters,
    although they are fairly cheap.

    You said that there are a lot of great cassette hubs out there besides Phil Wood. I take it that you
    don't buy some of the comments that they don't hold up as well as the Phil's and that they are not
    as smooth. Also, do you agree with the comment that the Ultegra races are a coarse machine tool
    finish. Also, you stated that they tend not to be lubed or adjusted properly. Perhaps it would be
    better to go to the DA's?

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > wayne-<< Hold everything. Maybe I would be better off sticking to
    freewheels
    > as long as I can. If 8s components are getting harder and harder find, how long before the
    > samething happens to 9s components?
    >
    > It has been over a decade since things went from freewheel to casettes and freewheels are stull
    > available. Even if evrything goes to 'light drive',
    there
    > will be 8/9 and 10s stuff around for a lot of years...worry about 9s stuff
    in
    > 2013...
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  16. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I called Rivendell about freewheels. They didn't have any but the Sunrace 7 speeds, but
    > recommended that I check the loosescrews.com web site. They had 14-34 Shimano HG 6 speeds for $21.
    > Also, you can get them custom built Shimano Uniglide 6 speeds for around $45.
    >
    > Hmm, you don't suppose that I would be making a mistake converting to cassette instead of ordering
    > a bunch of the freewheels? Certainly would be a lot cheaper.

    The best freewheel ever made, the Shimano 11-34 7-speed, costs me about $20 from my LBS. It's
    available into the foreseeable future so there's no need to stock up.

    Sheldon Brown has a good page on this particular freewheel. I don't agree with him that cassette
    hubs are categorically better than freewheel hubs, but I do agree with him on the superiority of the
    Shimano Mega 7 freewheel: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mega7/

    Chalo Colina
     
  17. Wayne T

    Wayne T Guest

    "Bluto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I called Rivendell about freewheels. They didn't have any but the
    Sunrace
    > > 7 speeds, but recommended that I check the loosescrews.com web site.
    They
    > > had 14-34 Shimano HG 6 speeds for $21. Also, you can get them custom
    built
    > > Shimano Uniglide 6 speeds for around $45.
    > >
    > > Hmm, you don't suppose that I would be making a mistake converting to cassette instead of
    > > ordering a bunch of the freewheels? Certainly would
    be
    > > a lot cheaper.
    >
    > The best freewheel ever made, the Shimano 11-34 7-speed, costs me about $20 from my LBS. It's
    > available into the foreseeable future so there's no need to stock up.

    Thanks. Certainly worth looking into, though I don't recall ever seeing one. Does it work with
    125mm spacing?
    >
    > Sheldon Brown has a good page on this particular freewheel. I don't agree with him that cassette
    > hubs are categorically better than freewheel hubs, but I do agree with him on the superiority of
    > the Shimano Mega 7 freewheel: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mega7/
    >
    > Chalo Colina
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Jon Isaacs) wrote:

    > >
    > >What exactly does replacing a freehub assembly involve? I take it that you don't have to replace
    > >the whole hub. Is that correct? If so, how much do hub assemblies cost?
    >
    > I really don't know what they cost, I never have bought one, I hear its in the $20 range. Changing
    > em isn't hard though it does involve pulling the axle. If you do get cassette style hubs, make
    > sure they are not pre-9 speed DA. They are different breed and the freehubs are expensive and rare
    > for them.

    I know exactly what changing a freehub is like, since I just did one.

    To change a freehub, you have to pull the axle and stick a 10 mm Allen (hex) wrench into the middle
    of the freehub, where the axle was until just a few moments ago. turn the wrench counterclockwise
    until you unscrew the hollow "bolt" you are turning. The freehub is now free for removal, and you
    can pull it away cleanly from the hub.

    Note that with a typical cup-and-cone bearing set, you're almost sure to have the axle's ball
    bearings dropping out like mad during this process. be sure to anticipate this.

    The hardest part of the job is probably finding a 10 mm hex wrench. Mine is a Craftsman socket from
    Sears. By bike tool standards, it's really cheap, and it works great.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  19. Bluto wrote:
    >
    > The best freewheel ever made, the Shimano 11-34 7-speed, costs me about $20 from my LBS. It's
    > available into the foreseeable future so there's no need to stock up.
    >

    I notice on Sheldon Brown's site that this is designed for 126 mm spacing - the same as six speed
    freewheels. Can I just subsitute one of these onto my older bike (friction shifting) presuming the
    derailer can take up enough chain?
     
  20. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    "Wayne T" <[email protected]> wrote:

    (me):
    > > The best freewheel ever made, the Shimano 11-34 7-speed, costs me about $20 from my LBS. It's
    > > available into the foreseeable future so there's no need to stock up.
    >
    >
    > Thanks. Certainly worth looking into, though I don't recall ever seeing one. Does it work with
    > 125mm spacing?

    Yes.

    Chalo Colina
     
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