cassettes and replacing them

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Chris Strug, Jun 8, 2003.

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  1. Chris Strug

    Chris Strug Guest

    Hello,

    I was just after a little advice. Basically, after a shameful year and bit in my garage I have
    decided to get my old Univega Alpina 530 out and get back to damaging my elbows and knees... :)

    The bike itself is still pretty sound. I've cleaned it, lubed it and put a new chain on. However,
    the gears are rather "jumpy". I've noticed that as soon as I put any power down it "slips". Now I
    *think* that this is due to the cassette being old and worn.

    Now assuming that I need a new cassette:

    1. can I just buy a new Shimano HG50 / 70 cassette and slap it on?

    2. Is it a fiddle to fit it? I.e. does it a require a degree of precision / know-how to fit it and
    get a smooth transmission / gear change? I don't want to waste thirty quid on one only to wreck
    it fitting it. I actually have the tool and would like ot do it myself if possible.

    I'm not completely sure what manufacturer / model the cassette actually is, however, the rear hub is
    an STX-RC.

    Thanks in advance for any help assistance and apologies if this isn't suitable for this NG (although
    in my defence the FAQ doesn't say anything against it!).

    Cheers

    Chris.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, "Chris Strug"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The bike itself is still pretty sound. I've cleaned it, lubed it and put a new chain on. However,
    > the gears are rather "jumpy". I've noticed that as soon as I put any power down it "slips". Now I
    > *think* that this is due to the cassette being old and worn.

    Yes, almost certainly. Chain slippage after you replace the old chain is a classic symptom of
    worn cogs.

    > Now assuming that I need a new cassette:
    >
    > 1. can I just buy a new Shimano HG50 / 70 cassette and slap it on?

    Yes. Pleas match the speeds

    > 2. Is it a fiddle to fit it? I.e. does it a require a degree of precision / know-how to fit it and
    > get a smooth transmission / gear change? I don't want to waste thirty quid on one only to wreck
    > it fitting it. I actually have the tool and would like ot do it myself if possible.

    No. It's trivial. You pull the wheel, remove the skewer, put the chain whip on the second-largest
    cog, and the tool on the lock ring. Unscrew and remove lock ring, slide all the gears straight off,
    clean and grease the splines (because you're being conscientious), and slide the new cassette on.

    > I'm not completely sure what manufacturer / model the cassette actually is, however, the rear hub
    > is an STX-RC.

    Sounds like you're dealing with a Shimano 8v freehub, though it may be 7 or 9 speeds. You can
    usually identify the exact cassette you have by counting the gears and the teeth in the top and
    bottom cogs, though there may be more than one that meets the spec. Within reason, going several
    teeth either way won't affect your drivetrain.

    > Thanks in advance for any help assistance and apologies if this isn't suitable for this NG
    > (although in my defence the FAQ doesn't say anything against it!).

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  3. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "Chris Strug" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > Now assuming that I need a new cassette:
    >

    I agree with Ryan on this one. It is a classic symptom. Usually it comes in after changing a chain.
    Slippage can aslo happen on a new chain/casette combo. You might want to try adjusting your rear
    deraileuer first.

    > 1. can I just buy a new Shimano HG50 / 70 cassette and slap it on?
    >
    > 2. Is it a fiddle to fit it? I.e. does it a require a degree of precision
    /
    > know-how to fit it and get a smooth transmission / gear change? I don't
    want
    > to waste thirty quid on one only to wreck it fitting it. I actually have
    the
    > tool and would like ot do it myself if possible.
    >

    Slip the socket into the splines

    Unscrew

    Pull out old cassette

    Put new one on (there is a key spline that is larger than the rest)

    Tighten down with the socket.

    It is about on par with changing the oil on your car.

    > I'm not completely sure what manufacturer / model the cassette actually
    is,
    > however, the rear hub is an STX-RC.
    >
    How old is it? I have a five-year-old bike with an STX rear hub. It does not have a cassette, but a
    freewheel. Hubs come in two types, the obsolete freewheel type and the newer freehub type. A
    cassette is just a stack of cogs that goes onto a freehub. A freewheel threads onto the hub and
    contains all of the ratcheting mechanisms within.

    Yours truly went out and bought a new 7-speed cassette for that hub thinking (actually not
    thinking) is was a freehub. Only after the cassette removal tool did not QUITE fit right did I do
    my homework. Doh!

    Here is a good reference:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

    -Dave
     
  4. Chris Strug

    Chris Strug Guest

    Ryan, Dave

    Cheers for the advice. I'll have a pop and let you know how I get on.

    Oh, one last question, I take it when it says things like "11-34" re - a cassette its referring to
    the number of teeth on the inner and outer cogs?

    Thanks again

    Chris.
     
  5. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    While you got everything apart,check the freehub for play.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  6. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "Chris Strug" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ryan, Dave
    >
    > Cheers for the advice. I'll have a pop and let you know how I get on.
    >
    > Oh, one last question, I take it when it says things like "11-34" re - a cassette its referring to
    > the number of teeth on the inner and outer cogs?

    Exactly.

    Cheers, -Dave
     
  7. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Sun, 08 Jun 2003 23:05:54 GMT, "Chris Strug" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello,

    [snip good question]

    Chris, you probably need to replace the chain, rear cassette, and possible the front chain ring(s).

    Support your LBS, stop by and have them check it out. If you're a do-it-your-selfer go to the
    library or bookstore...tons of good material to be found.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
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