Cast-iron leaching

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Lefty, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle was
    a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush (on
    a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    always sits on my stove burner.

    I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron, the
    only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear may
    have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    aluminum is used bare. I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that never
    have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse and
    maybe a salt-scour.

    So just now I did an experiment. I took a small skillet that I rarely use
    and has a minimum of seasoning left. The rim on the bottom had a few
    bare-metal areas from where it had scraped on a burner, and a few flecks of
    rust. I put a few drops of Muriatic (Hydrochloric) Acid there and it did
    what was expected: a slight discoloration reaction to the surface oxidation
    and a bit of fizz from the flecks of rust. Rinsed it clean and bright.

    Then I put some acid inside the pan and let it sit for ten minutes. When I
    rinsed it there was no effect on the seasoned surface: no discoloration, not
    a mark. Then I put in some acid and heated it on the burner until the acid
    had dried. I could see residue where the acid was, rinsed with hot water and
    there was obvious damage to the seasoned surface there, I could tell there
    was metal under it.

    Then I did the same tests on an old well-seasoned large pan I use often. The
    same results when cold, no effects; and when I heated it until the acid
    dried and rinsed the residue, this time there was no breach of the seasoned
    surface, and I couldn't tell there was ever any acid on it.

    Straight Hydrochloric acid (the kind you etch concrete with) is considerably
    more powerful than food acids, virtually exponential in reductive power. I
    don't know if heating straight acid until it dries and leaves a residue
    compares to any GOOD cooking (I had a housemate once who badly burnt my
    skillet frying chicken while drunk -- I made him take it down to the metal
    and season it again and again until it took a week to get it back to
    perfection), but I suspect a tomato might have to sit there for a least a
    week to even leave a spot. But I wouldn't cook any volatile sauces in the
    first pan until I seasoned it a lot better.

    As for the second skillet and others I always use, I don't think I will
    worry about it. When you use one a lot you basically season another layer
    whenever you dry it on a burner and coat it with a fresh film of oil before
    you put it away. If volatile acid cannot penetrate in, I can't see how iron
    molecules can penetrate out through what has cured to a polymer of some sort
    during normal use -- we're not dealing with an atomic accelerator here. I
    can't see where cooking anything non-acidic should be any cause for concern
    at all.

    My opinion of course, based on humble science. If I submit it for
    publication in Omni I might get a slip saying "REJECTION FOR: crap", but
    then they better not hang around my house looking to get some pancakes.

    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
    Tags:


  2. Food Snob

    Food Snob Guest

    Lefty wrote:
    > I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle was
    > a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush (on
    > a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    > always sits on my stove burner.
    >
    > I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron, the
    > only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear may
    > have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    > aluminum is used bare.


    The research that said aluminum causes Alzheimer's used faked data.

    > I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    > have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that never
    > have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse and
    > maybe a salt-scour.
    >


    The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.
    >
    > Lefty
    >

    --Bryan http://myspace.com/TheBonobos
     
  3. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Lefty wrote:
    > I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle was
    > a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush (on
    > a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    > always sits on my stove burner.
    >
    > I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron, the
    > only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear may
    > have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    > aluminum is used bare. I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    > have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that never
    > have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse and
    > maybe a salt-scour.
    >
    > So just now I did an experiment. I took a small skillet that I rarely use
    > and has a minimum of seasoning left. The rim on the bottom had a few
    > bare-metal areas from where it had scraped on a burner, and a few flecks of
    > rust. I put a few drops of Muriatic (Hydrochloric) Acid there and it did
    > what was expected: a slight discoloration reaction to the surface oxidation
    > and a bit of fizz from the flecks of rust. Rinsed it clean and bright.
    >
    > Then I put some acid inside the pan and let it sit for ten minutes. When I
    > rinsed it there was no effect on the seasoned surface: no discoloration, not
    > a mark. Then I put in some acid and heated it on the burner until the acid
    > had dried. I could see residue where the acid was, rinsed with hot water and
    > there was obvious damage to the seasoned surface there, I could tell there
    > was metal under it.
    >
    > Then I did the same tests on an old well-seasoned large pan I use often. The
    > same results when cold, no effects; and when I heated it until the acid
    > dried and rinsed the residue, this time there was no breach of the seasoned
    > surface, and I couldn't tell there was ever any acid on it.
    >
    > Straight Hydrochloric acid (the kind you etch concrete with) is considerably
    > more powerful than food acids, virtually exponential in reductive power. I
    > don't know if heating straight acid until it dries and leaves a residue
    > compares to any GOOD cooking (I had a housemate once who badly burnt my
    > skillet frying chicken while drunk -- I made him take it down to the metal
    > and season it again and again until it took a week to get it back to
    > perfection), but I suspect a tomato might have to sit there for a least a
    > week to even leave a spot. But I wouldn't cook any volatile sauces in the
    > first pan until I seasoned it a lot better.
    >
    > As for the second skillet and others I always use, I don't think I will
    > worry about it. When you use one a lot you basically season another layer
    > whenever you dry it on a burner and coat it with a fresh film of oil before
    > you put it away. If volatile acid cannot penetrate in, I can't see how iron
    > molecules can penetrate out through what has cured to a polymer of some sort
    > during normal use -- we're not dealing with an atomic accelerator here. I
    > can't see where cooking anything non-acidic should be any cause for concern
    > at all.
    >
    > My opinion of course, based on humble science. If I submit it for
    > publication in Omni I might get a slip saying "REJECTION FOR: crap", but
    > then they better not hang around my house looking to get some pancakes.
    >
    > Lefty



    You seem to think that iron leaching into the food is a bad thing.
    That's how Grandma got much of the iron in her diet.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  4. Food Snob wrote:

    >
    > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.
    >



    yup. Ain't nothing wrong with that. :)


    >>Lefty
    >>

    >
    > --Bryan http://myspace.com/TheBonobos
    >



    --

    saerah

    http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

    email:
    anisaerah at s b c global.net

    Adam Bowman wrote:
    >I always wonder when someone brings up a point about Bush, and you
    > then bring up something that Clinton did, are you saying they are both
    > wrong? Because that's all it points out to me, places where they both
    > messed up. It doesn't negate the fact that Bush did wrong; was that
    > your intention?
    >
    > That type of argument is like
    >
    > "Bob shot someone"
    >
    > "Yeah, but don't you remember when Don hit that guy with a bat?"
    >
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Food Snob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lefty wrote:
    > > I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle was
    > > a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush (on
    > > a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    > > always sits on my stove burner.
    > >
    > > I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron, the
    > > only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear may
    > > have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    > > aluminum is used bare.

    >
    > The research that said aluminum causes Alzheimer's used faked data.


    I still won't cook with aluminum...
    Ever since that time when I was inexperienced and covered a lasagna dish
    that I had slaved over to take to a potluck with aluminum foil. :-(

    I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    foil.

    Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.

    >
    > > I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    > > have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that never
    > > have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse and
    > > maybe a salt-scour.
    > >

    >
    > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.


    Spoken like the clueless twit you are. ;-)

    > >
    > > Lefty
    > >

    > --Bryan http://myspace.com/TheBonobos
    >

    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  6. Vanguard

    Vanguard Guest

    "Food Snob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Lefty wrote:
    >> I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle
    >> was
    >> a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush
    >> (on
    >> a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    >> always sits on my stove burner.
    >>
    >> I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron,
    >> the
    >> only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear
    >> may
    >> have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    >> aluminum is used bare.

    >
    > The research that said aluminum causes Alzheimer's used faked data.


    Guess I don't see the leap from leaching for aluminum to causing
    Alzheimer's. The worst that I've experienced is someone that makes
    sourdough bread in an aluminum bread pan.

    >> I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    >> have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that
    >> never
    >> have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse
    >> and
    >> maybe a salt-scour.
    >>

    >
    > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.


    And using vegetable oil is better?

    http://www.thescreamonline.com/essays/essays5-1/vegoil.html
    http://www.westonaprice.org/modernfood/dirty-secrets.html
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=23733
    http://www.healthywomen.org/resourc...hnews/reheatingvegetableoilreleasestoxinstudy

    It's been over a decade since I used cast iron skillets (seasoned, of
    course). My recollection was that I didn't need to add oil to cook. Since
    the pan was still seasoned after cooking, obviously almost none of the
    "grease" (lard) made its way into the food.
     
  7. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    ><snip>
    > I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    > before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    > foil.
    >
    > Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    >


    Anything acidic will cause this. I make a potato dish with sour cream
    that will do the same thing. What I have found works well is to cover
    the top of the food with wax paper then seal with tin foil. This is
    especially useful for those dishes you want to put into those foil pans
    when taking an oven dish but don't want the container back. The funny
    thing is I haven't noticed a problem with the foil trays only tin foil.
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You seem to think that iron leaching into the food is a bad thing.
    > That's how Grandma got much of the iron in her diet.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob


    Indeed... ;-)

    Works for me.

    If you don't have polycythemia or some iron overload disease, iron
    leaching from the frying pans is good for you!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > ><snip>
    > > I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    > > before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    > > foil.
    > >
    > > Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    > >

    >
    > Anything acidic will cause this. I make a potato dish with sour cream
    > that will do the same thing. What I have found works well is to cover
    > the top of the food with wax paper then seal with tin foil. This is
    > especially useful for those dishes you want to put into those foil pans
    > when taking an oven dish but don't want the container back. The funny
    > thing is I haven't noticed a problem with the foil trays only tin foil.


    I agree with that. :) Most baking pans are aluminum but I've gotten
    into the habit of using glass. And I have a monster #14 Griswold skillet
    I use for roasting. It holds a #20 turkey.

    I will use aluminum foil to bake with as long as acid won't come in
    contact with it, but I cover cooked dishes with cling wrap now...
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  10. Paul M. Cook

    Paul M. Cook Guest

    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One griddle

    was
    > a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire brush

    (on
    > a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that now
    > always sits on my stove burner.
    >
    > I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED cast-iron,

    the
    > only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the fear

    may
    > have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    > aluminum is used bare. I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    > have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that never
    > have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water rinse

    and
    > maybe a salt-scour.
    >
    > So just now I did an experiment. I took a small skillet that I rarely use
    > and has a minimum of seasoning left. The rim on the bottom had a few
    > bare-metal areas from where it had scraped on a burner, and a few flecks

    of
    > rust. I put a few drops of Muriatic (Hydrochloric) Acid there and it did
    > what was expected: a slight discoloration reaction to the surface

    oxidation
    > and a bit of fizz from the flecks of rust. Rinsed it clean and bright.
    >
    > Then I put some acid inside the pan and let it sit for ten minutes. When I
    > rinsed it there was no effect on the seasoned surface: no discoloration,

    not
    > a mark. Then I put in some acid and heated it on the burner until the acid
    > had dried. I could see residue where the acid was, rinsed with hot water

    and
    > there was obvious damage to the seasoned surface there, I could tell there
    > was metal under it.
    >
    > Then I did the same tests on an old well-seasoned large pan I use often.

    The
    > same results when cold, no effects; and when I heated it until the acid
    > dried and rinsed the residue, this time there was no breach of the

    seasoned
    > surface, and I couldn't tell there was ever any acid on it.
    >
    > Straight Hydrochloric acid (the kind you etch concrete with) is

    considerably
    > more powerful than food acids, virtually exponential in reductive power. I
    > don't know if heating straight acid until it dries and leaves a residue
    > compares to any GOOD cooking (I had a housemate once who badly burnt my
    > skillet frying chicken while drunk -- I made him take it down to the metal
    > and season it again and again until it took a week to get it back to
    > perfection), but I suspect a tomato might have to sit there for a least a
    > week to even leave a spot. But I wouldn't cook any volatile sauces in the
    > first pan until I seasoned it a lot better.
    >
    > As for the second skillet and others I always use, I don't think I will
    > worry about it. When you use one a lot you basically season another layer
    > whenever you dry it on a burner and coat it with a fresh film of oil

    before
    > you put it away. If volatile acid cannot penetrate in, I can't see how

    iron
    > molecules can penetrate out through what has cured to a polymer of some

    sort
    > during normal use -- we're not dealing with an atomic accelerator here. I
    > can't see where cooking anything non-acidic should be any cause for

    concern
    > at all.
    >
    > My opinion of course, based on humble science. If I submit it for
    > publication in Omni I might get a slip saying "REJECTION FOR: crap", but
    > then they better not hang around my house looking to get some pancakes.



    The iron that leaches into the food is highly assimilable. It's good for
    you.

    Paul
     
  11. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>><snip>
    >>>I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    >>>before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    >>>foil.
    >>>
    >>>Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Anything acidic will cause this. I make a potato dish with sour cream
    >>that will do the same thing. What I have found works well is to cover
    >>the top of the food with wax paper then seal with tin foil. This is
    >>especially useful for those dishes you want to put into those foil pans
    >>when taking an oven dish but don't want the container back. The funny
    >>thing is I haven't noticed a problem with the foil trays only tin foil.

    >
    >
    > I agree with that. :) Most baking pans are aluminum but I've gotten
    > into the habit of using glass. And I have a monster #14 Griswold skillet
    > I use for roasting. It holds a #20 turkey.
    >
    > I will use aluminum foil to bake with as long as acid won't come in
    > contact with it, but I cover cooked dishes with cling wrap now...


    Om, I'm thinking more along the lines of the tossable foil pans suitable
    for really messy dishes, freezing, or taking to potlucks. The good pans
    have a way of disappearing at potlucks and even some family events so I
    don't take bakeware/container I'm not prepared to lose. The larger
    ziploc containers are good too as long as the dish doesn't have to into
    the oven.
     
  12. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    >
    > The iron that leaches into the food is highly assimilable. It's good for
    > you.
    >
    > Paul


    If you are anemic maybe. There are health warnings about iron for males.
    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
    >
    >
     
  13. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    RE: Aluminum: I wasn't referring to the Alzheimer's thing. I just meant who
    would want aluminum to leach into the sauce? Which it would if you simmer
    acid-food.
    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful


    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Food Snob" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Lefty wrote:
    > > > I have used cast-iron skillets and griddles for many years. One

    griddle was
    > > > a rusty, pitted mess I was given for free then restored with wire

    brush (on
    > > > a drill) and course sand-paper followed by thorough seasoning, that

    now
    > > > always sits on my stove burner.
    > > >
    > > > I have always doubted the leaching theory with WELL-SEASONED

    cast-iron, the
    > > > only way anyone in their right mind would cook with it. Some of the

    fear may
    > > > have accompanied leaching problems with aluminum pots and acids, but
    > > > aluminum is used bare.

    > >
    > > The research that said aluminum causes Alzheimer's used faked data.

    >
    > I still won't cook with aluminum...
    > Ever since that time when I was inexperienced and covered a lasagna dish
    > that I had slaved over to take to a potluck with aluminum foil. :-(
    >
    > I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    > before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    > foil.
    >
    > Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    >
    > >
    > > > I take pains to season mine well inside and out. I
    > > > have simmered lots of tomatoey and other acid-based concoctions that

    never
    > > > have affected the seasoning layer and cleaned up with a hot water

    rinse and
    > > > maybe a salt-scour.
    > > >

    > >
    > > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.

    >
    > Spoken like the clueless twit you are. ;-)
    >
    > > >
    > > > Lefty
    > > >

    > > --Bryan http://myspace.com/TheBonobos
    > >

    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack

    Nicholson
     
  14. Lefty

    Lefty Guest


    > > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.

    >
    > And using vegetable oil is better?
    >
    > http://www.thescreamonline.com/essays/essays5-1/vegoil.html
    > http://www.westonaprice.org/modernfood/dirty-secrets.html
    > http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=23733
    >

    http://www.healthywomen.org/resourc...hnews/reheatingvegetableoilreleasestoxinstudy
    >
    > It's been over a decade since I used cast iron skillets (seasoned, of
    > course). My recollection was that I didn't need to add oil to cook.

    Since
    > the pan was still seasoned after cooking, obviously almost none of the
    > "grease" (lard) made its way into the food.


    The "curing" of the oils used in seasoning effectively makes a solid polymer
    (hate to say plastic, but plastic is one of the polymers) which acts like a
    natural Teflon. Those who would use Teflon ware because seasoning is
    "primitive" haven't seen the latest research on the amounts of Teflon we all
    have in our bloodstreams because over the years they said it was safe.

    I would not trade my precious collection of cast-iron ware for any other at
    any price. (Well, maybe a Ferrari.)
    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
  15. Paul M. Cook

    Paul M. Cook Guest

    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > The iron that leaches into the food is highly assimilable. It's good

    for
    > > you.
    > >
    > > Paul

    >
    > If you are anemic maybe. There are health warnings about iron for males.
    > Lefty



    You can indeed get sick from excess iron in the body. You'd have to eat
    half your skillet for this to happen. The amount of iron that gets into the
    food depends on the acidity of the food. I don't like to use my cast iron
    for acidic foods like tomatoes as it wears away the hard won seasoning.

    I can't imagine anyone getting sick from cast iron. Aluminum though ...
    that is quite debatable.

    Paul
     
  16. Pete C.

    Pete C. Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>><snip>
    > >>>I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    > >>>before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    > >>>foil.
    > >>>
    > >>>Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Anything acidic will cause this. I make a potato dish with sour cream
    > >>that will do the same thing. What I have found works well is to cover
    > >>the top of the food with wax paper then seal with tin foil. This is
    > >>especially useful for those dishes you want to put into those foil pans
    > >>when taking an oven dish but don't want the container back. The funny
    > >>thing is I haven't noticed a problem with the foil trays only tin foil.

    > >
    > >
    > > I agree with that. :) Most baking pans are aluminum but I've gotten
    > > into the habit of using glass. And I have a monster #14 Griswold skillet
    > > I use for roasting. It holds a #20 turkey.
    > >
    > > I will use aluminum foil to bake with as long as acid won't come in
    > > contact with it, but I cover cooked dishes with cling wrap now...

    >
    > Om, I'm thinking more along the lines of the tossable foil pans suitable
    > for really messy dishes, freezing, or taking to potlucks. The good pans
    > have a way of disappearing at potlucks and even some family events so I
    > don't take bakeware/container I'm not prepared to lose. The larger
    > ziploc containers are good too as long as the dish doesn't have to into
    > the oven.


    I wonder if the disposable AL pans are lightly anodized since they
    indeed don't seems to have the pitting issue. I've also noticed that the
    pitting issue only seems to occur in cold storage which is odd since
    chemical reactions happen faster at higher temperatures.

    Pete C.
     
  17. Phluge

    Phluge Guest


    >
    > You can indeed get sick from excess iron in the body. You'd have to eat
    > half your skillet for this to happen. The amount of iron that gets into

    the
    > food depends on the acidity of the food. I don't like to use my cast iron
    > for acidic foods like tomatoes as it wears away the hard won seasoning.


    Did you read my post where I used straight Hydrochloric acid on my well
    seasoned pan and it never even left a splotch on the surface of the
    seasoning? The polymers that form good seasoning make it impervious except
    to scortching. Man, you mean you wouldn't make chili in your cast iron?
    Nothing simmers chili like cast iron.

    >
    > I can't imagine anyone getting sick from cast iron. Aluminum though ...
    > that is quite debatable.



    > Paul



    As for aluminum the acid visibly pits the aluminum so the aluminum must
    affect the taste at least. Aluminum is good for cooking pasta.>

    I did some checking online and it seems like there would probably be very
    low toxic risk from the iron if it did leach, although your half-skillet
    figure is a bit on the high side.

    According to an online clinical source the USDA range is 6mg. for a baby to
    30 mg. for a pregnant woman.

    If you have half-skillets that weigh that little, I want to invest :)
    Lefty
    --
    "Even a child who is pure at heart
    And does his homework neatly
    May become a wolf when the wolfsbane blooms
    And the moon is full, completely."
    >
    >
     
  18. Food Snob

    Food Snob Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > You seem to think that iron leaching into the food is a bad thing.
    > > That's how Grandma got much of the iron in her diet.
    > >
    > > Best regards,
    > > Bob

    >
    > Indeed... ;-)
    >
    > Works for me.
    >
    > If you don't have polycythemia or some iron overload disease, iron
    > leaching from the frying pans is good for you!


    Iron overload is a concern. Generally, menstruating women are the only
    people who benefit from "+ iron" multivitamins. Others shouldn't use
    them because too much iron isn't good for you. I don't know how much
    gets leached from pans though.
    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >

    --Bryan
     
  19. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    Food Snob wrote:
    >
    > The idea of cooking on grease buildup is a bit nauseating. That whole
    > "seasoned" cast iron thing seems like, primitive.


    Wow, you must not have sex either, beings it's so "primitive" :p
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>><snip>
    > >>>I had to sit and scrape all the little bitter black spots off of it
    > >>>before I could serve it where the tomato had eaten little holes in the
    > >>>foil.
    > >>>
    > >>>Aluminum is too reactive IMHO and aluminum oxide tastes nasty.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Anything acidic will cause this. I make a potato dish with sour cream
    > >>that will do the same thing. What I have found works well is to cover
    > >>the top of the food with wax paper then seal with tin foil. This is
    > >>especially useful for those dishes you want to put into those foil pans
    > >>when taking an oven dish but don't want the container back. The funny
    > >>thing is I haven't noticed a problem with the foil trays only tin foil.

    > >
    > >
    > > I agree with that. :) Most baking pans are aluminum but I've gotten
    > > into the habit of using glass. And I have a monster #14 Griswold skillet
    > > I use for roasting. It holds a #20 turkey.
    > >
    > > I will use aluminum foil to bake with as long as acid won't come in
    > > contact with it, but I cover cooked dishes with cling wrap now...

    >
    > Om, I'm thinking more along the lines of the tossable foil pans suitable
    > for really messy dishes, freezing, or taking to potlucks. The good pans
    > have a way of disappearing at potlucks and even some family events so I
    > don't take bakeware/container I'm not prepared to lose. The larger
    > ziploc containers are good too as long as the dish doesn't have to into
    > the oven.


    I see your point... You can always transfer the dish from glass, steel
    or iron into a suitable container.

    Those disposable aluminum baking dishes are okay, as long as what I am
    making is not acidic. After that one experience I'm just leery of any
    chance of discoloring or bitter spots to something I'm making.

    They are handy for meat roasts so you can toss rather than wash them!

    That big Griswold is so well seasoned, it's easy to clean.
    I generally let the dogs pre-clean it for me. <G> Once the cats are done
    tho'. They get first dibs.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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