Cateye Cordless mounting



G

Geoff Pearson

Guest
I bought a new Cateye Cordless computer today. It has a
nasty system of mounting with nylon ties - which make it
difficult to remove. I suppose that was the idea - but can I
buy proper screw on mountings for it and the sender?
 
E

Eugenio Mastrov

Guest
On Sat, 27 Mar 2004 13:04:49 +0000, Geoff Pearson wrote:

> that was the idea - but can I buy proper screw on
> mountings for it and the sender?

If you find some, please let me know - there aren't any,
according to Evans. And watch for railway power lines - they
interfere with the transmission and you'll find that the max
speed for your trip was 130 Km/h

Eugenio

--
Q: Where does virgin wool come from?
R: Ugly sheep.
 
G

Geoff Pearson

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> in message <[email protected]
> berlin.de>, Geoff
Pearson
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
> > I bought a new Cateye Cordless computer today. It has
> > a nasty
system
> > of mounting with nylon ties - which make it difficult to
> > remove. I suppose that was the idea - but can I buy
> > proper screw on mountings for it and the sender?
>
> What's horrid about it? They're quick to fit, and, once
> the ends are trimmed, look neat. They're easy to remove
> (pen-knife) and cheap to replace. Altogether a better
> solution, I would say.
>
> --
> [email protected] (Simon Brooke)
> http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/ "The result is a
> language that... not even its mother could love. Like the
> camel, Common Lisp is a horse designed by committee.
> Camels do have their uses." ;; Scott Fahlman, 7 March 1995
>
>

They are not tight, adjustable or removable. Cheap and nasty
- luckily the Cateye 2 mount is still available so I'll get
one from Wiggle.
 
T

Tony W

Guest
"Eugenio Mastroviti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...

>
> If you find some, please let me know - there aren't any,
> according to Evans. And watch for railway power lines -
> they interfere with the transmission and you'll find that
> the max speed for your trip was 130 Km/h

Surely no train has gone that fast in Britain since Isabard
Kingdom Mousetrouser was a boy.

T
 
J

Johnb

Guest
Geoff Pearson wrote:
>
> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:gfqgj1-
> [email protected]
> > in message <[email protected]
> > berlin.de>, Geoff
> Pearson
> > ('[email protected]') wrote:
> >
> > > I bought a new Cateye Cordless computer today. It has
> > > a nasty
> system
> > > of mounting with nylon ties - which make it difficult
> > > to remove. I suppose that was the idea - but can I buy
> > > proper screw on mountings for it and the sender?
> >
> > What's horrid about it? They're quick to fit, and, once
> > the ends are trimmed, look neat. They're easy to remove
> > (pen-knife) and cheap to replace. Altogether a better
> > solution, I would say.

> They are not tight, adjustable or removable.

I agree with entirely Simon. To get them tight just pull the
zip tie with a pair of pliers. And they are very neat - with
no screw to lose in the grass.

> Cheap and nasty - luckily the Cateye 2 mount is still
> available so I'll get one from Wiggle.

I think you would be wasting your money, but that's your
choice if you prefer the older model.

John B
 
E

Eugenio Mastrov

Guest
On Sat, 27 Mar 2004 18:17:43 +0000, Tony W wrote:

>> If you find some, please let me know - there aren't any,
>> according to Evans. And watch for railway power lines -
>> they interfere with the transmission and you'll find that
>> the max speed for your trip was 130 Km/h
>
> Surely no train has gone that fast in Britain since
> Isabard Kingdom Mousetrouser was a boy.

Uh, no, it's just that the EM field around the power lines
is "sensed" by the receiving unit as coming from the sensor,
with interesting results.

The first time I cycled to work with the new cordless
thingamajig, I left the bike near the server room UPS and at
the end of the day it claimed it'd done over 600 Km at an
average speed of 110 Km/h...

Eugenio

--
Conservative, n.: One who admires radicals centuries after
they're dead.
 
J

Johnb

Guest
Eugenio Mastroviti wrote:

>
> Uh, no, it's just that the EM field around the power lines
> is "sensed" by the receiving unit as coming from the
> sensor, with interesting results.
>
> The first time I cycled to work with the new cordless
> thingamajig, I left the bike near the server room UPS and
> at the end of the day it claimed it'd done over 600 Km at
> an average speed of 110 Km/h...

Beats getting fit on the turbo trainer then ;-)

John B
 
A

Andymorris

Guest
JohnB wrote:
>
> I agree with entirely Simon. To get them tight just pull
> the zip tie with a pair of pliers. And they are very neat
> - with no screw to lose in the grass.
>

Untill I read it, i didn't know that you could slip a small
screwdriver blade into the clicky bit and undo them.

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

Love this:
Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
G

Geoff Pearson

Guest
"AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> JohnB wrote:
> >
> > I agree with entirely Simon. To get them tight just pull
> > the zip tie with a pair of pliers. And they are very
> > neat - with no screw to lose in the grass.
> >
>
> Untill I read it, i didn't know that you could slip a
> small
screwdriver
> blade into the clicky bit and undo them.
>
>
> --
> Andy Morris
>
> AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK
>
>
> Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
> http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
>
>

I know you can do that - but you can't get them tight.