Cateye EL500

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ron Hardin, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    I tried a 4th HL500 last night - it does make it pretty bright
    compared to one, still not up where you can see the road surface against
    high traffic interfering lights though, and, neat as it looks, it
    does run up to $160. (Justification for wife - they also work as
    flashlights, and have the same streamlined shape.)

    The chief result was accidental - that the things go dim pretty fast
    on NiMH batteries that run out, taking about a half hour to go from
    full bright to see-me lights with no illumination for the rider;
    two of the three lights already on the bike ran out on the same
    trip. So carry a 4-pack of AA's if it's your only light. Lithium
    is much lighter and impervious to winter and storage in a bike bag, I
    guess, if you want a nice 10-year emergency pack.

    You can load them in the dark if you remember the pattern orientation.
    It's the same whether you hold the light upside down or not so you
    don't have to see to load.

    I load one with 1700 maH batteries and the rest with 2200, so there's
    a warning before they all go out that it's recharge time. Dimming
    would be too late in warning you.
    --
    Ron Hardin
    [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
    Tags:


  2. Ron Hardin wrote:

    > I tried a 4th HL500 last night - it does make it pretty bright
    > compared to one, still not up where you can see the road surface against
    > high traffic interfering lights though, and, neat as it looks, it
    > does run up to $160. (Justification for wife - they also work as
    > flashlights, and have the same streamlined shape.)
    >
    > The chief result was accidental - that the things go dim pretty fast
    > on NiMH batteries that run out, taking about a half hour to go from
    > full bright to see-me lights with no illumination for the rider;
    > two of the three lights already on the bike ran out on the same
    > trip. So carry a 4-pack of AA's if it's your only light. Lithium
    > is much lighter and impervious to winter and storage in a bike bag, I
    > guess, if you want a nice 10-year emergency pack.
    >
    > You can load them in the dark if you remember the pattern orientation.
    > It's the same whether you hold the light upside down or not so you
    > don't have to see to load.
    >
    > I load one with 1700 maH batteries and the rest with 2200, so there's
    > a warning before they all go out that it's recharge time. Dimming
    > would be too late in warning you.


    I measured the light output of an HL-EL200 on NiMH and new alkaline
    cells. It was *halved* with the 1.2V NiMH cells. In contrast, filament
    bulbs usually burn brighter (at least on average over the cell's
    lifetime) with rechargeables.
     
  3. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    > > I load one with 1700 maH batteries and the rest with 2200, so there's
    > > a warning before they all go out that it's recharge time. Dimming
    > > would be too late in warning you.

    >
    > I measured the light output of an HL-EL200 on NiMH and new alkaline
    > cells. It was *halved* with the 1.2V NiMH cells. In contrast, filament
    > bulbs usually burn brighter (at least on average over the cell's
    > lifetime) with rechargeables.


    I couldn't tell any difference between new alkalines and the existing NiMH
    by eye. The chief difference would seem to be that NiMH dies fast when it
    dies, and alkaline tapers down over hours, at least I suppose it does.

    I use alkaline in the LED taillights for that reason; there's lots of warning,
    several rides, that you should change the (AAA) batteries, when you think, well
    maybe I could change the batteries there, it's getting sort of dim. You could
    go several more rides even then, and how bright do taillights have to be anyway.
    --
    Ron Hardin
    [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  4. Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I use alkaline in the LED taillights for that reason; there's lots of
    >warning, several rides, that you should change the (AAA) batteries, when
    >you think, well maybe I could change the batteries there,


    Odd; I use rechargeables because of that behaviour from alkalines. I hate
    wondering if I should change the batteries or maybe let them go a little
    further; with a rechargeable, it either works or it doesn't.

    I have three tail lights one of which is dynamo fed, though, so I'm not
    too worried if one of them dies on me.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  5. Hi, Ron, your subject line is EL500 but your post is about HL500.

    Anyway, I recently purchased an EL-500 and put lithium batteries in
    it. Having only got to use it during a faily full moon, I can't tell
    you what its like in real darkness but it does seem to have a pretty
    good beam.

    Lewis.

    **********************


    Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]g.com>...
    > I tried a 4th HL500 last night - it does make it pretty bright
    > compared to one, still not up where you can see the road surface against
    > high traffic interfering lights though, and, neat as it looks, it
    > does run up to $160. (Justification for wife - they also work as
    > flashlights, and have the same streamlined shape.)
    >
    > The chief result was accidental - that the things go dim pretty fast
    > on NiMH batteries that run out, taking about a half hour to go from
    > full bright to see-me lights with no illumination for the rider;
    > two of the three lights already on the bike ran out on the same
    > trip. So carry a 4-pack of AA's if it's your only light. Lithium
    > is much lighter and impervious to winter and storage in a bike bag, I
    > guess, if you want a nice 10-year emergency pack.
    >
    > You can load them in the dark if you remember the pattern orientation.
    > It's the same whether you hold the light upside down or not so you
    > don't have to see to load.
    >
    > I load one with 1700 maH batteries and the rest with 2200, so there's
    > a warning before they all go out that it's recharge time. Dimming
    > would be too late in warning you.
     
  6. Gonzo Bob

    Gonzo Bob New Member

    Joined:
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    Actually, he talks about (4) AA batteries so he's probably indeed talking about the HL-EL500. The HL500 takes C batteries.
     
  7. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Gonzo Bob wrote:
    >
    > Lewis Campbell Wrote:
    > > Hi, Ron, your subject line is EL500 but your post is about HL500.

    >
    > Actually, he talks about (4) AA batteries so he's probably indeed
    > talking about the HL-EL500. The HL500 takes C batteries.
    >
    > --
    > Gonzo Bob


    Right, my fingers tend toward HL when unattended.

    I have an alternative of 2 HL-1500's which is what got put into
    my finger memory. They also take 4 AA's, and are nice and bright,
    but sometimes don't last the length of the trip, which is the
    problem with them.

    So anyway I have 4 EL500's now. They're okay, I guess. Brighter
    would be nicer but they're tolerable. They do last the trip, in fact
    several trips. Nicely made, apparently waterproof.

    As I say, they dim out over a very short period when the NiMH batteries
    do die, so you need an extra set of batteries, or use smaller capacity
    batteries in one so that it serves as a canary in the mine and warns
    you to recharge them all when you get home.

    You don't want taillights going out so I use alkalines there, with
    the led taillights. They just get slowly dim like LEDs are supposed to
    do.
    --
    Ron Hardin
    [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
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