cateye

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Marian Rosenber, Sep 9, 2003.

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  1. My old bicycle computer was a CatEye Dual. It snapped on and off the handlebar fairly easily. It
    didn't have as many functions as my current computer but it did what I wanted (recorded distance.) I
    especially liked that it came with a wristband for when it isn't on the bicycle.

    I still have the computer, but the wires were on the bike that was stolen. Does anyone know how to
    get new components?

    My new bicycle computer is a CatEye Enduro 2.

    (It isn't that I have any special preference for CatEye. Both times I have bought the only model
    available at the store ... the first time it wasn't just the only model but the only unit too.)

    I'm having some problems with it, and am wondering if I should gripe to the nice people in Japan who
    make these and get a replacement or what...

    I don't particularly like the lack of wrist strap or the comparative difficulty in removing it from
    the handlebars but that isn't so much a problem as a nuisance.

    There are three problmes.

    1) Sometimes I put the main unit on the handlebars and it does not register the bicycle as moving.
    2) It thinks my maximum speed achieved over the last few days was 74.0 kph. A few days ago it told
    me my max speed was 120.2 kph. As I have a max speed function it would be nice if it read
    correctly. My max speed is more in the 30-35 kph range.
    3) Sometimes the main unit tells me I am moving (even quite fast) when I am nowhere near the
    bike...such as when I am eating lunch.
     
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  2. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:27:06 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > liked that it came with a wristband for when it isn't on the bicycle.

    Why would you want to wear a cyclocomputer on your wrist?

    > I still have the computer, but the wires were on the bike that was stolen. Does anyone know how to
    > get new components?

    Maybe http://www.cateye.com/contact.php

    > (It isn't that I have any special preference for CatEye. Both times I

    I've found my Cateye Astrale to be superior to the Trek and Specialized computers I have.

    > I don't particularly like the lack of wrist strap or the comparative difficulty in removing it
    > from the handlebars but that isn't so much a problem as a nuisance.

    Is it any different to remove than my Astrale?

    All I do is press a release trigger on the bottom of it and it slides off easily.

    My Specialized, OTOH, requires you to push with a lot of force, which usually just makes the mount
    slide on the handlebar; and my Trek comes off easily, especially when you don't want it to in a MTB
    wipeout...

    > 1) Sometimes I put the main unit on the handlebars and it does not register the bicycle as moving.

    ...is clicked into it's mount well?

    > 2) It thinks my maximum speed achieved over the last few days was 74.0 kph. A few days ago it told
    > me my max speed was 120.2 kph. As I have a max speed function it would be nice if it read
    > correctly. My max speed is more in the 30-35 kph range.
    > 3) Sometimes the main unit tells me I am moving (even quite fast) when I am nowhere near the
    > bike...such as when I am eating lunch.

    2 is probably related to 3. Those sound like interference on a wireless setup, but I see that
    it's wired.

    Is there anything electric near the sensor? Or anything magnetic?

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  3. Rick Onanian wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:27:06 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> liked that it came with a wristband for when it isn't on the bicycle.
    >
    > Why would you want to wear a cyclocomputer on your wrist?

    Because when I park the bicycle outside of a store I don't like to leave the expensive gizmo on the
    bike. And the wristband means that I have a convenient place to carry the gizmo ... especially as it
    has a nice large time display, I can even use it as a clock.

    >> I still have the computer, but the wires were on the bike that was stolen. Does anyone know how
    >> to get new components?
    >
    > Maybe http://www.cateye.com/contact.php

    d'oh!

    >> I don't particularly like the lack of wrist strap or the comparative difficulty in removing it
    >> from the handlebars but that isn't so much a problem as a nuisance.
    >
    > Is it any different to remove than my Astrale?
    >
    > All I do is press a release trigger on the bottom of it and it slides off easily.

    The release trigger is placed such that I bump into the buttons when I am pressing it. It is also
    comparatively difficult to remove. It isn't difficult per se, just comparatively difficult.

    I am not sure what kind (or brand) of cyclocomputer I had on my wheelchair but I remember that as
    being fairly easy to remove in the way that the Cateye Dual was easy to remove. This one is not so
    easy to remove. It could be more difficult, but it could also be a lot less difficult ... especially
    since I know that the same brand makes ones that are easier to remove.

    >> 1) Sometimes I put the main unit on the handlebars and it does not register the bicycle as
    >> moving.
    >
    > ...is clicked into it's mount well?

    yep ...

    >> 2) It thinks my maximum speed achieved over the last few days was 74.0 kph. A few days ago it
    >> told me my max speed was 120.2 kph. As I have a max speed function it would be nice if it read
    >> correctly. My max speed is more in the 30-35 kph range.
    >> 3) Sometimes the main unit tells me I am moving (even quite fast) when I am nowhere near the
    >> bike...such as when I am eating lunch.
    >
    > 2 is probably related to 3. Those sound like interference on a wireless setup, but I see that
    > it's wired.
    >
    > Is there anything electric near the sensor? Or anything magnetic?

    The first time I noticed it, I had just removed it from my bag to put on the bike ... and it said I
    was going 10kph. The phone is kept in another pocket. My leather glvoes were wrapped around it.

    The second time I noticed it it was sitting on the cafeteria table (which is metal). No electric
    sockets nearby. No electrical equipment nearby, save for the ceiling lights. I can deliberately make
    it say I am moving by placing the unit flat on the table.

    -M
     
  4. Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote
    >... My new bicycle computer is a CatEye Enduro 2.
    >
    > There are three problems with it:
    >
    > 1) Sometimes I put the main unit on the handlebars and it does not register the bicycle as moving.
    > 2) It thinks my maximum speed achieved over the last few days was 74.0 kph. A few days ago it told
    > me my max speed was 120.2 kph. As I have a max speed function it would be nice if it read
    > correctly. My max speed is more in the 30-35 kph range.
    > 3) Sometimes the main unit tells me I am moving (even quite fast) when I am nowhere near the
    > bike...such as when I am eating lunch.

    Two possible problems:

    1. The magnet us too far from the picker (the fixed thing that sits on the fork). This is a typical
    cause for intermittent signal, although not for problems #2 and #3.

    2. You have a loose battery contact. You might open the cover and make sure the battery is well set.
    It's fairly unlikely, but as it is a $0 solution, it's worth checking.

    3. There is an intermittent signal going to the computer. The most probable cause is because the
    terminals under the unit don't come into full contact with its base. Make sure the unit is fully
    engaged in the base, clean contacts, sand them *lightly*, etc. to make sure there is no rust.
    Another possibility is that your cable is bent and that wires have a loose contact inside the
    cable. Then you would either need another cable (in theory, it's for sale somewhere), or you
    would need to solder and repair the cable.

    Regards,

    Michel Gagnon
     
  5. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 21:52:01 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The release trigger is placed such that I bump into the buttons when I am pressing it. It is also
    > comparatively difficult to remove. It isn't difficult per se, just comparatively difficult.

    I looked at a picture of the Enduro 2, and if the release trigger is in the same place as my
    Astrale, I can see your problem.

    As far as difficult to remove; does it have a lot of friction when you slide it? If that's the
    problem, you could try either an oil, grease, or a dry lubricant like powdered graphite.

    > wheelchair but I remember that as being fairly easy to remove in the way

    I have a Trek Sonic that's pretty easy to remove. ;)

    > The first time I noticed it, I had just removed it from my bag to put on the bike ... and it said
    > I was going 10kph. The phone is kept in another

    I think a lot of them will momentarily register some speed when removed and installed; sometimes one
    of mine does, though I forgot which one.

    > pocket. My leather glvoes were wrapped around it.

    Hmm...sweat from the gloves as a conductor?

    > The second time I noticed it it was sitting on the cafeteria table (which is metal). No electric
    > sockets nearby. No electrical equipment nearby, save for the ceiling lights. I can deliberately
    > make it say I am moving by placing the unit flat on the table.

    There's definately your answer; conductivity of the metal table would be one cause (possibly one of
    _many_ causes).

    Of course, it could just be defective. :)

    > -M
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  6. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 21:52:01 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> from wrote:

    >Rick Onanian wrote:
    >> On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:27:06 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> liked that it came with a wristband for when it isn't on the bicycle.
    >>
    >> Why would you want to wear a cyclocomputer on your wrist?
    >
    >Because when I park the bicycle outside of a store I don't like to leave the expensive gizmo on
    >the bike.

    They aren't expensive anymore.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace YOW!! The land of the rising SONY!!
    9:11:44 AM 9 September 2003
     
  7. Rick Onanian wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 21:52:01 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The release trigger is placed such that I bump into the buttons when I am pressing it. It is also
    >> comparatively difficult to remove. It isn't difficult per se, just comparatively difficult.
    >
    > I looked at a picture of the Enduro 2, and if the release trigger is in the same place as my
    > Astrale, I can see your problem.
    >
    > As far as difficult to remove; does it have a lot of friction when you slide it? If that's the
    > problem, you could try either an oil, grease, or a dry lubricant like powdered graphite.

    There was some stiffness when I first got it but that has gone away now-probably because I am more
    used to it.

    It slides in nice and easy. It is the taking it out that isn't as easy. Within a few days I could
    remove my old computer on autopilot. This one, after nearly three weeks, still requires conscious
    thought and effort to take off the bicycle. Not a few times I've found I left it on the bike when
    running short errands.

    >> The first time I noticed it, I had just removed it from my bag to put on the bike ... and it said
    >> I was going 10kph. The phone is kept in another
    >
    > I think a lot of them will momentarily register some speed when removed and installed; sometimes
    > one of mine does, though I forgot which one.

    I was about to put it on my bike. I had not actually put it on my bike yet.

    >> pocket. My leather glvoes were wrapped around it.
    >
    > Hmm...sweat from the gloves as a conductor?

    maybe

    >> The second time I noticed it it was sitting on the cafeteria table (which is metal). No electric
    >> sockets nearby. No electrical equipment nearby, save for the ceiling lights. I can deliberately
    >> make it say I am moving by placing the unit flat on the table.
    >
    > There's definately your answer; conductivity of the metal table would be one cause (possibly one
    > of _many_ causes).
    >
    > Of course, it could just be defective. :)

    problems aside it is a nice bike toy ... definitely has more useful whizzbangs than my last one.

    -M
     
  8. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Marian Rosenberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Of course, it could just be defective. :)
    >
    > problems aside it is a nice bike toy ... definitely has more useful whizzbangs than my last one.

    I vote for defective. I have two Enduro 2 and one Astrale and none of them have the problems you are
    describing.

    -Buck
     
  9. Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I still have the computer, but the wires were on the bike that was stolen. Does anyone know how to
    > get new components?

    CatEye sells mounting brackets, but once you factor in shipping it'll probably cost more than a
    brand new unit. Even getting the part locally might not be cost-effective, although it doesn't hurt
    to ask your LBS about it.

    > 1) Sometimes I put the main unit on the handlebars and it does not register the bicycle as moving.
    > 2) It thinks my maximum speed achieved over the last few days was 74.0 kph. A few days ago it told
    > me my max speed was 120.2 kph. As I have a max speed function it would be nice if it read
    > correctly. My max speed is more in the 30-35 kph range.

    The three main points of failure in a cyclo-computer are the magnet/sensor (I find the Enduro2/Mity3
    magnet tricky to set up and easy to knock out of alignment), the wire, and the braket/computer
    coupling. I'd suspect the magnet/sensor alignment if I were you.

    Having a multimeter really helps in checking the magnet/sensor alignment:
    <http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer-troubleshoot.html>

    > 3) Sometimes the main unit tells me I am moving (even quite fast) when I am nowhere near the
    > bike...such as when I am eating lunch.

    If you look at the back of the Enduro2, you'll see that the two contact pins protrude a bit.
    Bridging the two pins with a metallic object will register as one rotation of the wheel.
    Intermittent contact (like when you put the computer in your pocket with your keys and loose change)
    can produce interesting results.

    --
    Frederic Briere <*> [email protected]

    => <[email protected]> IS NO MORE: <http://www.abacomsucks.com> <=
     
  10. Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The release trigger is placed such that I bump into the buttons when I am pressing it. It is also
    > comparatively difficult to remove. It isn't difficult per se, just comparatively difficult.

    I agree that the Enduro/Mity can be a PITA to remove sometimes, but I've had problems with
    older/cheaper computers coming off their socket while carrying the bike (even had one fall off
    during a ride), so I'm not bitter.

    I've found the easiest way to remove the Enduro/Mity is to use only your thumb, and push the latch
    from below, not above. (IOW, your hand should be below the bracket, and your thumb should point up.)
    Simply both press down the latch and push out the computer with your thumb. No more bumping into the
    buttons. :)

    --
    Frederic Briere <*> [email protected]

    => <[email protected]> IS NO MORE: <http://www.abacomsucks.com> <=
     
  11. Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Sep 2003 21:52:01 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> from wrote:
    >>Rick Onanian wrote:
    >>>Why would you want to wear a cyclocomputer on your wrist?
    >>Because when I park the bicycle outside of a store I don't like to leave the expensive gizmo on
    >>the bike.
    > They aren't expensive anymore.

    In the US.

    I wasn't clear about my circumstances.

    I currently live in a developing country that, in some places, is very definitely still a third
    world country. In my country of origin they aren't expensive.

    Here, I have well-to-do acquaintances who, if they did not spend any money at all (no rent, no food,
    no clothing expenditures) could manage to save enough money to buy one in a week or ten days.

    For the cost of my cyclocomputer I can theoretically eat for 2 weeks. If I'm not eating western
    food, an expensive resteraunt meal for me is one where I spend more than $1.50 (US).

    If I leave my *removable* _expensive_ gizmo on the bike it isn't a question of if it will get
    stolen. It is a question of when.

    -M
     
  12. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 20:27:13 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> from wrote:

    >I wasn't clear about my circumstances.
    >
    >I currently live in a developing country that, in some places, is very definitely still a third
    >world country.....

    >For the cost of my cyclocomputer I can theoretically eat for 2 weeks. If I'm not eating western
    >food, an expensive resteraunt meal for me is one where I spend more than $1.50 (US).

    Do you have an online diary or journal of your experiences where you are? IT sounds like you're
    getting lots of good story material. I'd be particularly interested in bike stuff, of course.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Laundry is the fifth dimension!! ... um ...
    um ... th' washing machine is a black hole and the pink socks are bus drivers who just fell in!!
    9:29:02 PM 10 September 2003
     
  13. Kevan Smith wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 20:27:13 +0800, Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> from wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I wasn't clear about my circumstances.
    >>
    >>I currently live in a developing country that, in some places, is very definitely still a third
    >>world country.....
    >
    >
    >>For the cost of my cyclocomputer I can theoretically eat for 2 weeks. If I'm not eating western
    >>food, an expensive resteraunt meal for me is one where I spend more than $1.50 (US).
    >
    >
    >
    > Do you have an online diary or journal of your experiences where you are? IT sounds like you're
    > getting lots of good story material. I'd be particularly interested in bike stuff, of course.

    That I do ... though I don't usually go hyping it ...

    As I get more fit and I use the bicycle more there will be more bicycle stuff. When I first got here
    a little more than a year ago I was never going to get a bike. About a month before, I had wobbled
    my way down the road near my boyfriend's house bursting with pride that I had ridden a bicycle
    again. The bicycling part had gone fine but the next day I couldn't walk.

    I got my first bike in October. But it wasn't until March that I really started using it or May that
    I really started doing a lot of biking.

    My journal can be found at www yahoo groups dot com slash groups slash marian in china.

    Because of a rather nasty provision in Yahoo's Terms of Service you have to subscribe to read the
    group. Otherwise the content isn't owned by
    me. It probably wouldn't stand up in court but I don't want to get to that point.

    You can join by sending email to:

    Marian In China Dash Subscribe At Yahoo Groups Dot Com

    -M
     
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