Cause of sit bone pain?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by S.P., Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. S.P.

    S.P. Guest

    What causes the sit bones to be sore?

    I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones very
    sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat. Curiously, when I used to
    ride the bike a lot -- 12 years ago, commuting, 6 miles round-trip -- it didn't bother me, even
    though I'm a woman.

    Sooooo.... what might be causing this?

    Some other things that might be relevant: the bike used to feel like a really good fit, and now it
    feels slightly too small. (I'm 41, so it's hardly due to a growth spurt, surely?!) I have drop
    handle-bars and don't mind leaning forwards, although right now I'm varying positions a lot.

    Most of the posts I've read seem to talk about soft-tissue pain. I'm thinking of getting a new
    saddle, but would like to know a bit more about what drives ischial tuberosity soreness, to inform
    my saddle buying.

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have, __Sharon
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (S.P.) wrote in news:cf7c75dd.0304281312.2f1c5939 @posting.google.com:
    > What causes the sit bones to be sore? I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again.

    The pain is caused by weak muscles. No matter how well your bike and saddle fit your body, your rear
    end is going to get sore if you haven't ridden in a while. After a few rides, your muscles will
    strengthen and the pain will go away.
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "S.P." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What causes the sit bones to be sore?
    >
    > I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones very
    > sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat. Curiously, when I used
    > to ride the bike a lot -- 12 years ago, commuting, 6 miles round-trip -- it didn't bother me, even
    > though I'm a woman.
    >
    > Sooooo.... what might be causing this?
    >
    > Some other things that might be relevant: the bike used to feel like a really good fit, and now it
    > feels slightly too small. (I'm 41, so it's hardly due to a growth spurt, surely?!) I have drop
    > handle-bars and don't mind leaning forwards, although right now I'm varying positions a lot.
    >
    > Most of the posts I've read seem to talk about soft-tissue pain. I'm thinking of getting a new
    > saddle, but would like to know a bit more about what drives ischial tuberosity soreness, to inform
    > my saddle buying.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have, __Sharon

    When I'm sitting and just toodling along, I get the same pain. All of your weight is being supported
    on two very small areas...

    It may be that your posterior isn't used to the pressure any more. Give it a few rides to get back
    into the feel of things, so to speak, before you go buying a new saddle. (Unless you just want to
    buy a new saddle just because.)

    Mike
     
  4. Well, since, as you metioned niether the bike nor you have been altered size wise, it's probably
    just a matter of age and out of condition.

    For the first, I might recommend a slightly wider saddle, such as those specifically tailored for
    the female anatomy (read; wider sit bones).

    As for the second, there is only one solution: Ride.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 18:45:01 -0400, Chris Zacho The Wheelman wrote:

    > Well, since, as you metioned niether the bike nor you have been altered size wise, it's probably
    > just a matter of age and out of condition.
    >

    Or perhaps less flexibility? 10, 15 years ago handlebar 4 inches below the saddle was fine for me.
    These days I like the handlebar at seat height, and bikes with a handlebar that low definitely feels
    "small" to
    me.
     
  6. On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 14:12:34 +0000, S.P. wrote:

    > What causes the sit bones to be sore?
    >
    > I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones very
    > sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat. Curiously, when I used
    > to ride the bike a lot -- 12 years ago, commuting, 6 miles round-trip -- it didn't bother me, even
    > though I'm a woman.
    >
    > Sooooo.... what might be causing this?
    >
    > Some other things that might be relevant: the bike used to feel like a really good fit, and now it
    > feels slightly too small. (I'm 41, so it's hardly due to a growth spurt, surely?!) I have drop
    > handle-bars and don't mind leaning forwards, although right now I'm varying positions a lot.
    >
    >
    If it's got one of those gel saddles that were popular about that time, it's possible the gel has
    turned hard, and it's time for a new saddle.

    Otherwise, it's time to get a new pair of cycling shorts, some chamois butt'r, and ride.

    I like the tip about raising the handlebars; that might be tipping your hips too far forward.

    -Dondo
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Captain Dondo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 14:12:34 +0000, S.P. wrote:
    >
    > > What causes the sit bones to be sore?
    > >
    > > I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones
    > > very sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat. Curiously, when I
    > > used to ride the bike a lot -- 12 years ago, commuting, 6 miles round-trip -- it didn't bother
    > > me, even though I'm a woman.
    > >
    > > Sooooo.... what might be causing this?
    > >
    > > Some other things that might be relevant: the bike used to feel like a really good fit, and
    > > now it feels slightly too small. (I'm 41, so it's hardly due to a growth spurt, surely?!) I
    > > have drop handle-bars and don't mind leaning forwards, although right now I'm varying
    > > positions a lot.
    > >
    > >
    > If it's got one of those gel saddles that were popular about that time, it's possible the gel has
    > turned hard, and it's time for a new saddle.
    >
    > Otherwise, it's time to get a new pair of cycling shorts, some chamois butt'r, and ride.
    >
    > I like the tip about raising the handlebars; that might be tipping your hips too far forward.
    >
    > -Dondo

    If she's tipping her hips too far forward, it wouldn't have as much to do with sit bone pain as it
    would with soft tissue pain. This sounds more like an "upright position and lack of saddle time"
    pain to me...

    Mike
     
  8. Harris

    Harris Guest

    S.P. <[email protected]> wrote:
    > What causes the sit bones to be sore?

    > I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones very
    > sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat.

    I think the words "just getting back to riding my road bike" gives a clue. If you haven't been
    riding regularly, it's gonna hurt for a while. You just have to tough it out until you get some more
    miles in. Eventually, the saddle will break you in. <g>

    Art Harris
     
  9. S . P .

    S . P . Guest

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 17:45:52 -0700, "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If she's tipping her hips too far forward, it wouldn't have as much to do with sit bone pain as it
    >would with soft tissue pain. This sounds more like an "upright position and lack of saddle time"
    >pain to me...

    Thanks all. "Upright position and lack of saddle time" matches my current state, so I'll suck it up
    for a while more. Gotta get that flexibility and strength back :-(. Despite the sit bone pain,
    though, it feels *great* to be out on the bike again.

    __Sharon ------------ And now a word from our sponsor ---------------------- For a quality mail
    server, try SurgeMail, easy to install, fast, efficient and reliable. Run a million users on a
    standard PC running NT or Unix without running out of power, use the best! ---- See
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  10. "S.P." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What causes the sit bones to be sore?
    >
    > I'm just getting back to riding my road bike again. My saddle now seems to make my sit bones very
    > sore very fast. It's a touring bike with a normal hard narrow men's seat. Curiously, when I used
    > to ride the bike a lot -- 12 years ago, commuting, 6 miles round-trip -- it didn't bother me, even
    > though I'm a woman.
    >
    > Sooooo.... what might be causing this?

    Don't change your saddle. If you have not been riding for a while and your sitz bones are sore, that
    is an indication that you have the correct saddle. That's where the pressure should be. If it
    weren't there then it would be on areas of soft tissue. The sitz bones will quickly adapt to time in
    the saddle, soft tissue will not.

    >
    > Some other things that might be relevant: the bike used to feel like a really good fit, and now it
    > feels slightly too small. (I'm 41, so it's hardly due to a growth spurt, surely?!) I have drop
    > handle-bars and don't mind leaning forwards, although right now I'm varying positions a lot.

    A few years ago I got on my bike after a layoff of several years. My bike which had fit well seemed
    off in several areas. I adjusted stem height and length to fit the new (out of shape) me. Over the
    1st year I kept readjusting and eventually ended up back to the settings I started with.
    Conditioning changes things (as does the lack of). Honor where you're at, yet be ready to change.

    >
    > Most of the posts I've read seem to talk about soft-tissue pain. I'm thinking of getting a new
    > saddle, but would like to know a bit more about what drives ischial tuberosity soreness, to inform
    > my saddle buying.
    >

    soft saddles = soft tissue pain
     
  11. S . P .

    S . P . Guest

    On Tue, 29 Apr 2003 15:37:16 -0700, "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"S.P." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> What causes the sit bones to be sore?
    >
    >Don't change your saddle. If you have not been riding for a while and your sitz bones are sore,
    >that is an indication that you have the correct saddle. That's where the pressure should be. If it
    >weren't there then it would be on areas of soft tissue. The sitz bones will quickly adapt to time
    >in the saddle, soft tissue will not.

    Mmmmph, ouch, OK, I'll do it :).

    I noticed that the saddle was tilted forwards, so I adjusted it to be more horizontal. What I'm
    not sure of is if it always used to be tilted like that. But it feels better in its new position,
    and it's starting to feel possible that in fact I'll get adapted again. The first day it just
    felt horrid.

    >A few years ago I got on my bike after a layoff of several years. My bike which had fit well seemed
    >off in several areas. I adjusted stem height and length to fit the new (out of shape) me. Over the
    >1st year I kept readjusting and eventually ended up back to the settings I started with.
    >Conditioning changes things (as does the lack of). Honor where you're at, yet be ready to change.

    OK, thanks. I'll see if in a year I'm tilting the saddle back forwards again :). Actually even over
    the past few days the bike is starting to feel better again.

    >soft saddles = soft tissue pain

    That's succinct! Thanks for the comments.

    __Sharon ------------ And now a word from our sponsor ------------------ For a quality usenet news
    server, try DNEWS, easy to install, fast, efficient and reliable. For home servers or carrier class
    installations with millions of users it will allow you to grow! ---- See
    http://netwinsite.com/sponsor/sponsor_dnews.htm ----
     
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