Cedar Plank Grilling question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Steve B., Jul 24, 2005.

  1. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    from the lumber company?

    The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    is correct?

    Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    what temperature to cook at.

    Steve
    --
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com
     
    Tags:


  2. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes.
    > Which is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill
    > and cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither
    > mentions what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve


    Soak the plank (and if you buy it from the lumber store make sure it isn't
    "treated" lumber... they aren't selling you cooking wood) for 1 hour at
    least.

    Oil the wood then place the salmon skin side down and cover on the grill and
    let it smoke about 20-25 minutes (depends on the thickness). Until it
    flakes.

    Jill
     
  3. Steve B. wrote:

    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?


    According to the following website, you should use Western White Cedar,
    not Eastern Red Cedar.

    http://www.barbecuen.com/faqsnew/cookingsalmononcedarplanks.htm

    Q: The native Americans I know from the Quinault tribe in WA state
    cooked salmon on a cedar stick, and also on a board, as they didn't
    have frying pans or grills, and didn't hurt them!

    A: Aye, Cederman,

    They were cooking on either Port Oxford or Western White Cedar which is
    limited to the Pacific Northwest. Folk in the rest of the country have
    Juniper or Eastern Red Cedar which is very aromatic and has substantial
    pesticidal (toxic) properties. Chests and closets, built or lined with
    Red Cedar, prevent moths from attacking the contents. Fungi and
    bacteria which quickly consume most woods eschew Red Cedar. Boats built
    of Red Cedar don't rot.

    So, if you live in the Pacific Northwest and want to cook on a cedar
    plank, have fun. Anywhere else in the country, you should have your
    planks shipped in.

    Have fun,
    Smoky

    ---

    Derek Juhl
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?


    30 minutes.

    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.


    400 to 425 F works for us. The temp range is a bit finicky, actually.
    Too high and the plank will burn, or char. Too low and you don't get
    much of a smoke/aroma effect. If you are at the right temp, and pop the
    grill (only momentarily) you may see tiny wisps of smoke coming from the
    wood, but it should not be on fire. Or you can put your nose near the
    grill vents. If you are near the right temp you will smell a distinct
    and pleasant woody aroma, but you should not be getting heavy smoke.

    By cooincidence, we are grilling some planked halibut in mustard glaze,
    as I write this.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
     
  12. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  13. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  14. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  15. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  16. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  17. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  18. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  19. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
  20. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    Well, we tried it last night with Home Depot rough sawn cedar, and we
    both awoke this morning. I think Eastern red cedar is the stuff they
    carve hillbilly souvenirs from. Very red and does not grow large enough
    for lumber. This must be the white stuff.

    I used only melted butter for seasoning and mild farmed salmon so we
    could taste the cedar effect, which was not much. Grill reached 550
    degrees but wood on the cool side did not smoke much, although it did
    char a little. More baked than smoked. Cooked 1 1/2" thick belly
    fillets in 20 min, but it had to sit another 10 min on the cooling grill
    because the wife was late.

    Delicious meal, but the highlight was a bottle of Arroyo del Sol Pinot
    Noir from A Taste of Monterey, a wine club that specializes in the wines
    of Monterey County.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Steve B. wrote:
    > Must I use the yuppie plank from the gourmet store? Can I use cedar
    > from the lumber company?
    >
    > The yuppie plank package says to soak them for 30 minutes. My fish
    > market hands out a recipe that says soak the plank for 3 minutes. Which
    > is correct?
    >
    > Both sources say place the planks on the unheated side of the grill and
    > cool for about 12 minutes with the cover closed, but neither mentions
    > what temperature to cook at.
    >
    > Steve
     
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