Ceeramic Knives



A

Allan Matthews

Guest
I notice there are a few ceramic knives produced by companies other
that Kyocera. There are priced relatively low. Has anybody bought
one of these?
 
K

Kathleen

Guest
I have the Kyocera ceramic chef knife.
I have to say that even though it was outrageously expensive, it is
fabulous.
Mine was a gift so I didn't even have to pay for it.
It is almost three years old and as sharp as the day I got it.
You can cut lettuce etc. without worrying about browning becuase it
isn't metal.
You do have to be careful with it though. I chipped off the tip almost
as soon as I got it but other than that it is perfect. Don't put it in
the dishwasher. Mine gets used so much I am never willing to wait for
the dishwasher to wash it anyway.
Christmas is coming - put it on your list!
K.


Allan Matthews wrote:
> I notice there are a few ceramic knives produced by companies other
> that Kyocera. There are priced relatively low. Has anybody bought
> one of these?
 
A

aem

Guest
Kathleen wrote:
> [snip] Don't put it in
> the dishwasher. Mine gets used so much I am never willing to wait for
> the dishwasher to wash it anyway.


Wandering here, but have to say it: no knife should be put in a
dishwasher -- none, no matter what kind, under no circumstances, never.
Proper handling of a knife goes like this: take it out of its block
or holder, cut with it, rinse it, dry it, put it back. Notice it never
left your hand. Make it your never to be violated habit. When you've
done it properly 100 times we'll talk about adding a steel to the
routine. -aem
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Kathleen wrote:

> I have the Kyocera ceramic chef knife.
> I have to say that even though it was outrageously expensive, it is
> fabulous.
> Mine was a gift so I didn't even have to pay for it.
> It is almost three years old and as sharp as the day I got it.


Mine are at least 10 years old and still as sharp as the day I bought them.

> You do have to be careful with it though. I chipped off the tip almost
> as soon as I got it but other than that it is perfect


The ends are chipped both of mine, but that happened with in months of
getting them. We have been more careful with them.


>
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Kathleen wrote:

> I have the Kyocera ceramic chef knife.
> I have to say that even though it was outrageously expensive, it is
> fabulous.
> Mine was a gift so I didn't even have to pay for it.
> It is almost three years old and as sharp as the day I got it.


Mine are at least 10 years old and still as sharp as the day I bought them.

> You do have to be careful with it though. I chipped off the tip almost
> as soon as I got it but other than that it is perfect


The ends are chipped both of mine, but that happened with in months of
getting them. We have been more careful with them.


>
 
S

Steve knight

Guest

>Wandering here, but have to say it: no knife should be put in a
>dishwasher -- none, no matter what kind, under no circumstances, never.
> Proper handling of a knife goes like this: take it out of its block
>or holder, cut with it, rinse it, dry it, put it back. Notice it never
>left your hand. Make it your never to be violated habit. When you've
>done it properly 100 times we'll talk about adding a steel to the
>routine. -aem


a dishwasher can only hurt a knife if A it bangs against something and
B if it has a wooden handle.
Knight-Toolworks
http://www.knight-toolworks.com
affordable handmade wooden planes
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
Steve knight wrote:
> >Wandering here, but have to say it: no knife should be put in a
> >dishwasher -- none, no matter what kind, under no circumstances, never.
> > Proper handling of a knife goes like this: take it out of its block
> >or holder, cut with it, rinse it, dry it, put it back. Notice it never
> >left your hand. Make it your never to be violated habit. When you've
> >done it properly 100 times we'll talk about adding a steel to the
> >routine. -aem

>
> a dishwasher can only hurt a knife if A it bangs against something and
> B if it has a wooden handle.


********!

Dishwasher cleaning agents will definitely destroy carbon steel
cutlery, and rather rapidly... stainless *steels* will take a bit
longer, but will be destroyed nevertheless. Even high quality
stainless steel cookware will become dulled and pitted. And never wash
quality glassware with a dishwasher. Dishwashers are for your el
cheapo restaurant type dishes/flatware, not your expensive for-company
service.

Sheldon
 
A

aem

Guest
Steve knight wrote:
> >Wandering here, but have to say it: no knife should be put in a
> >dishwasher -- none, no matter what kind, under no circumstances, never.
> > Proper handling of a knife goes like this: take it out of its block
> >or holder, cut with it, rinse it, dry it, put it back. Notice it never
> >left your hand. Make it your never to be violated habit. When you've
> >done it properly 100 times we'll talk about adding a steel to the
> >routine. -aem

>
> a dishwasher can only hurt a knife if A it bangs against something and
> B if it has a wooden handle.


I'm less interested in warning about dishwashers than I am in advancing
the notion of how to handle a knife. One would think about putting it
in the dishwasher only if you had let it lie around the kitchen dirty
long enough for something to foul the blade. If you do that you're
mistreating the knife in the first place, you're being unsafe, you're
being inefficient. -aem
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Steve knight wrote:

> a dishwasher can only hurt a knife if A it bangs against something and
> B if it has a wooden handle.


That is what a friend of mine thought, which lead to the short life of the
handles of several of her good Henkel knives.
 
A

Allan Matthews

Guest
On Sun, 04 Dec 2005 23:33:55 GMT, Allan Matthews
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I notice there are a few ceramic knives produced by companies other
>that Kyocera. There are priced relatively low. Has anybody bought
>one of these?


All of these replies are interesting, but has anybody purchased one of
the ceramic knives made by somebody other that Kyocera?
 
A

aem

Guest
Allan Matthews wrote:
> On Sun, 04 Dec 2005 23:33:55 GMT, Allan Matthews
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >I notice there are a few ceramic knives produced by companies other
> >that Kyocera. There are priced relatively low. Has anybody bought
> >one of these?

>
> All of these replies are interesting, but has anybody purchased one of
> the ceramic knives made by somebody other tha[n] Kyocera?


Well, we wander....My sister was given a ceramic paring knife which I
am pretty sure is by Eagle, or maybe American Eagle. Like all ceramic
knives I have seen, it is quite sharp and it is quite light. She has
never chipped it, but then she doesn't use it very often either because
the handle doesn't fit her hand particularly well. I have no clue how
to judge the quality of the brand, if that's what you're trying to get
at. -aem