Century training program?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Reenie, Mar 15, 2003.

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  1. Reenie

    Reenie Guest

    I'm hoping that someone can help. I'm a runner - but I've been injured this past year and have
    turned to cycling for cross-training. I've been training on an indoor trainer all winter (because
    of the weather) and have now set my sights on riding a century, hopefully towards the beginning of
    the summer.

    I usually ride six days a week (sometimes two short rides a day) but could do with some advice as I
    try to put a training program together. I ride anywhere from 30 minutes (usually recovery sessions)
    to two hours (not too many of these as it's quite boring riding inside!!), but probably average hour
    long rides. I also weight-train 3-4 days a week, so I feel I have an okayish base.

    I'm probably looking to find a twelve week program - or to put one together myself. Can anyone offer
    advice? I prefer to train by 'time' as opposed to 'miles'... any websites, books, magazines???

    Thanks,

    Reenie
     
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  2. Josh Gatts

    Josh Gatts Guest

    "Reenie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm hoping that someone can help. I'm a runner - but I've been injured this past year and have
    > turned to cycling for cross-training. I've been training on an indoor trainer all winter (because
    > of the weather) and have now set my sights on riding a century, hopefully towards the beginning of
    > the summer.
    >
    > I usually ride six days a week (sometimes two short rides a day) but could do with some advice as
    > I try to put a training program together. I ride anywhere from 30 minutes (usually recovery
    > sessions) to two hours (not too many of these as it's quite boring riding inside!!), but probably
    > average hour long rides. I also weight-train 3-4 days a week, so I feel I have an okayish base.
    >
    > I'm probably looking to find a twelve week program - or to put one together myself. Can anyone
    > offer advice? I prefer to train by 'time' as opposed to 'miles'... any websites, books,
    > magazines???
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Reenie

    Reenie:

    Bicycling Magazine has an effective 10-week program:

    http://www.arkansasbicycleclub.org/tips/tip1.html

    The program is based on mileage, not time. I think this is more appropriate, since you're training
    to ride 100 miles, not x hours. Generally, if you can ride about 60 miles comfortably, you'll be
    able to ride a century without much difficulty. Just remember to eat and drink a lot.

    Good luck!

    Josh
     
  3. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Reenie" wrote:
    > I'm hoping that someone can help. I'm a runner - but I've been injured this past year and have
    > turned to cycling for cross-training. I've been training on an indoor trainer all winter (because
    > of the weather) and have now set my sights on riding a century, hopefully towards the beginning of
    > the summer.
    >
    > I usually ride six days a week (sometimes two short rides a day) but could do with some advice as
    > I try to put a training program together. I ride anywhere from 30 minutes (usually recovery
    > sessions) to two hours (not too many of these as it's quite boring riding inside!!), but probably
    > average hour long rides. I also weight-train 3-4 days a week, so I feel I have an okayish base.
    >
    > I'm probably looking to find a twelve week program - or to put one together myself. Can anyone
    > offer advice? I prefer to train by 'time' as opposed to 'miles'... any websites, books,
    > magazines???

    Is your goal simply to complete a century regardless of speed, or to do it within "X"
    number of hours?

    My club has a 10 week spring training program each year leading up to a mid-May century ride. The
    weekly rides start at 30 miles, and increase in distance by 5-10 miles each week. The week before
    the century, we do an 80 miler. This has worked out well over the years, even for newbies attempting
    their first century.

    Doing daily short, fast rides won't do it. You have to do one long ride each week. Before attempting
    the century you should have completed at least a 75 mile ride. The idea is to enjoy the century, not
    just endure it! You have to learn to pace yourself (nothing is worse than "bonking" halfway through
    a century). Eat/drink often and get off the bike to stretch occasionally.

    Art Harris
     
  4. Reenie

    Reenie Guest

    Thanks for the response.

    My goal is to complete the century comfortably and in a decent time. From putting my running
    schedule together I recognize the importance of a long session, and as the weather warms (hopefully
    over this next couple of weeks) I plan to head out for a long weekly ride, gradually building up the
    miles each week.

    One of my main questions is, what is best to do inbetween weekly long rides? I enjoy training 5-6
    days a week but don't know how best to structure the week.

    Best,

    Reenie

    > "Reenie" wrote:
    > > I'm hoping that someone can help. I'm a runner - but I've been injured this past year and have
    > > turned to cycling for cross-training. I've been training on an indoor trainer all winter
    > > (because of the weather) and have now set my sights on riding a century, hopefully towards the
    > > beginning of the summer.
    > >
    > > I usually ride six days a week (sometimes two short rides a day) but could do with some advice
    > > as I try to put a training program together. I ride anywhere from 30 minutes (usually recovery
    > > sessions) to two hours (not too many of these as it's quite boring riding inside!!), but
    > > probably average hour long rides. I also weight-train 3-4 days a week, so I feel I have an
    > > okayish base.
    > >
    > > I'm probably looking to find a twelve week program - or to put one together myself. Can anyone
    > > offer advice? I prefer to train by 'time' as opposed to 'miles'... any websites, books,
    > > magazines???
    >
    > Is your goal simply to complete a century regardless of speed, or to do it within "X" number
    > of hours?
    >
    > My club has a 10 week spring training program each year leading up to a mid-May century ride. The
    > weekly rides start at 30 miles, and increase in distance by 5-10 miles each week. The week before
    > the century, we do an 80 miler. This has worked out well over the years, even for newbies
    > attempting their first century.
    >
    > Doing daily short, fast rides won't do it. You have to do one long ride each week. Before
    > attempting the century you should have completed at least a 75 mile ride. The idea is to enjoy the
    > century, not just endure it! You have to learn to pace yourself (nothing is worse than "bonking"
    > halfway through a century). Eat/drink often and get off the bike to stretch occasionally.
    >
    > Art Harris
     
  5. Reenie

    Reenie Guest

    Thanks for the link Josh, it looks like a helpful schedule.

    Reenie

    "Josh Gatts" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Reenie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm hoping that someone can help. I'm a runner - but I've been injured this past year and have
    > > turned to cycling for cross-training. I've been training on an indoor trainer all winter
    > > (because of the weather) and have now set my sights on riding a century, hopefully towards the
    > > beginning of the summer.
    > >
    > > I usually ride six days a week (sometimes two short rides a day) but could do with some advice
    > > as I try to put a training program together. I ride anywhere from 30 minutes (usually recovery
    > > sessions) to two hours (not too many of these as it's quite boring riding inside!!), but
    > > probably average hour long rides. I also weight-train 3-4 days a week, so I feel I have an
    > > okayish base.
    > >
    > > I'm probably looking to find a twelve week program - or to put one together myself. Can anyone
    > > offer advice? I prefer to train by 'time' as opposed to 'miles'... any websites, books,
    > > magazines???
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Reenie
    >
    > Reenie:
    >
    > Bicycling Magazine has an effective 10-week program:
    >
    > http://www.arkansasbicycleclub.org/tips/tip1.html
    >
    > The program is based on mileage, not time. I think this is more appropriate, since you're training
    > to ride 100 miles, not x hours. Generally, if you can ride about 60 miles comfortably, you'll be
    > able to ride a century without much difficulty. Just remember to eat and drink a lot.
    >
    > Good luck!
    >
    > Josh
     
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