CEOs say how you treat a waiter can predict a lot about character

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob (this one), Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    human being.

    Hard to tell which defines the other.

    http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e

    Pastorio
     
    Tags:


  2. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:

    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >
    > Pastorio


    Great article. I think the principle extends to other areas,
    too. Usenet even. Meeting people that I've known on usenet
    confirmed this. If they're mean and self-centered on usenet,
    they're that way in person, too. If not overtly than in a
    latent, just below the surface way.

    I also like the "Unwritten Rules" in the left column. Check
    it out. Much wisdom there.

    My favorite is #21, "Don't get excited in engineering emergencies".
    Excellent career advice.

    --
    Reg
     
  3. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.


    Hey, I made that observation here years ago. On a date?
    Watch how the other person treats the waiter.

    nancy
     
  4. I think the usenet reference was accurate. I used to work in insurance
    on a phone line for senior citizens. One overtly obnoxious jerk
    screamed at me that 'I thought he was an asshole because he was 65'.
    My comment back to him, although it was not PC, I felt was accurate,
    was that 'No sir, I don't think that because you are 65, chances are
    very good that you were one at 45 as well.'
    -Ginny
     
  5. Food Snob

    Food Snob Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e


    I am someone who requires extra attention. I go through salsa, water,
    iced tea rather quickly, and I really appreciate wait staff being on
    top of not letting me go without unless they are obviously really busy.
    I got good service at lunch and tipped $6 on a $22.xx check. I am
    always exceedingly polite and warm to the servers too. Thanking them
    often, and with a sincere smile.
    If it weren't for the fact that I ran out of salsa twice, it would have
    been $7. They had a lot of customers. On occasions where it's dead,
    and they have more time to provide better service, I make sure to tip
    35-40% or more. I am applying the Golden Rule in a way. I treat them
    the way that I feel would be fair and just of the roles were reversed.
    I feel that I would deserve to be tipped commensurate with the degree
    and quality of service I provided. I want the business relationship to
    be one of mutual respect. Lord knows most economic relationships in
    the USA don't follow that regime.
    A few of the servers at that particular restaurant are onto the fact
    that when I get perfect service, I tip accordingly, and that's
    something that's appealing to them. Pretty much all the Mexican
    immigrant waiters try to do things that way (and I'm pretty damned sure
    all of them are documented as I know the owner's reputation) because
    they have yet to sour on the American dream, something that many
    native-born Americans no longer have because they see their economic
    relations with the society as downwardly mobile, whereas recent legal
    immigrants from south of the border perceive their status as upwardly
    mobile.
    I often joke that I can't have a conversation that doesn't soon evolve
    into one about food. Here, my post has gone toward another passion,
    political economy.
    >
    > Pastorio


    --Bryan
     
  6. Reg wrote:

    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >> Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    >> human being.
    >>
    >> Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >>
    >> Pastorio

    >
    >
    > Great article. I think the principle extends to other areas,
    > too. Usenet even. Meeting people that I've known on usenet
    > confirmed this. If they're mean and self-centered on usenet,
    > they're that way in person, too. If not overtly than in a
    > latent, just below the surface way.
    >
    > I also like the "Unwritten Rules" in the left column. Check
    > it out. Much wisdom there.
    >
    > My favorite is #21, "Don't get excited in engineering emergencies".
    > Excellent career advice.
    >

    My favourte is #11 "Confirm instructions you give others, and their
    commitments, in writing." I learned that as an articled clek - you write
    them a letter saying "I confirm our conversation of even date in which
    you agreeed to such and such," and unless they write back disputing it,
    you've got them. Emails have made implementing this rule so easy that
    their is no excuse for overlooking it.

    Christine
     
  7. Serene

    Serene Guest

    On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 18:38:22 -0400, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    >> human being.
    >>
    >> Hard to tell which defines the other.

    >
    >Hey, I made that observation here years ago. On a date?
    >Watch how the other person treats the waiter.


    Yep. I refuse to go out with people who are rude to waitstaff, or
    anyone else they perceive to be "beneath" them. You can really tell
    people's character by how they treat people they don't *have* to be
    nice to.

    serene
     
  8. "Old Mother Ashby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I learned that as an articled clek - you write them a letter saying "I
    > confirm our conversation of even date in which you agreeed to such and
    > such," and unless they write back disputing it, you've got them.



    If you have to "get them", they should not be working for you.
     
  9. If you're crappy to anyone who hasn't earned your enmity, that's the
    definition of a crappy human being.

    But that bus runs both ways on this street. If the waiter is an
    asshole, there's no reason not to return the favor.

    Frankly, that entire article is insulting to the general public. CEOs
    are some of the biggest scumbags on earth, and to pretend they deserve
    the privilege of acting with nobless oblige is to kiss the asses of a
    collection of self-assumed aristocrats.

    --Blair
     
  10. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Old Mother Ashby wrote:


    > My favourte is #11 "Confirm instructions you give others, and their
    > commitments, in writing." I learned that as an articled clek - you
    > write them a letter saying "I confirm our conversation of even date
    > in which you agreeed to such and such," and unless they write back
    > disputing it, you've got them. Emails have made implementing this
    > rule so easy that their is no excuse for overlooking it.



    In old days, our informal (handwritten) memo forms were labeled AVO.
    That stood for Avoid Verbal Orders. Now everybody just uses email.



    Brian
    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
     
  11. Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    >"Old Mother Ashby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >> I learned that as an articled clek - you write them a letter saying "I
    >>confirm our conversation of even date in which you agreeed to such and
    >>such," and unless they write back disputing it, you've got them.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >If you have to "get them", they should not be working for you.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Sorry, wasn't talking about people working for me, I was talking about
    the other party in a legal matter. Verbal agreements are worth the paper
    they're written on, you know.

    "Get it in writng" is actually the second rule you learn as a baby
    lawyer. The first is "Get their names". Not easy these days, they're all
    called Michelle or Rebecca and none of them have surnames.

    Christine
     
  12. Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    >If you're crappy to anyone who hasn't earned your enmity, that's the
    >definition of a crappy human being.
    >
    >But that bus runs both ways on this street. If the waiter is an
    >asshole, there's no reason not to return the favor.
    >
    >Frankly, that entire article is insulting to the general public. CEOs
    >are some of the biggest scumbags on earth, and to pretend they deserve
    >the privilege of acting with nobless oblige is to kiss the asses of a
    >collection of self-assumed aristocrats.
    >
    >--Blair
    >
    >
    >

    I nominate you to join Phred and Dave as official rfc Grumpy Old Men. ;-)

    Christine
     
  13. Old Mother Ashby wrote:
    > Blair P. Houghton wrote:
    > >Frankly, that entire article is insulting to the general public. CEOs
    > >are some of the biggest scumbags on earth, and to pretend they deserve
    > >the privilege of acting with nobless oblige is to kiss the asses of a
    > >collection of self-assumed aristocrats.

    >
    > I nominate you to join Phred and Dave as official rfc Grumpy Old Men. ;-)


    I accept, but only if when I go off you hear it in a Walter Matthau
    bombastic-rant voice.

    --Blair
    "I always liked that guy."
     
  14. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >
    > Pastorio


    "I saw a lot of character, or the lack thereof," says Holtzman, who says he
    can still carry three dishes in his right hand and two in his left."

    I can stack five dishes up my left arm and carry one in my right hand. I
    can also carry four glasses of water or iced tea (three in my left hand, one
    in my right) to a table. I also know the proper way to serve milk from a
    small carton is to carry a glass of ice and an empty glass; pour the ice
    into the empty glass and then pour the milk into the chilled glass. And I
    can pour a beer with exactly 1" head of foam. So, do I get the job? ;)

    Jill
     
  15. "Food Snob" <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >> Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    >> human being.
    >>
    >> Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e

    >
    > I am someone who requires extra attention. I go through salsa, water,
    > iced tea rather quickly, and I really appreciate wait staff being on
    > top of not letting me go without unless they are obviously really busy.
    > I got good service at lunch and tipped $6 on a $22.xx check. I am
    > always exceedingly polite and warm to the servers too. Thanking them
    > often, and with a sincere smile.
    > If it weren't for the fact that I ran out of salsa twice, it would have
    > been $7. They had a lot of customers. On occasions where it's dead,
    > and they have more time to provide better service, I make sure to tip
    > 35-40% or more.


    <snipage for space>

    Bryan, which restaurant it this? I have a couple of Mexican restaurants I
    go to.

    Michael

    >
    > --Bryan
    >
    >




    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  16. "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    berlin.de:

    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >
    > Pastorio


    Doing a google groups search on Pastorio can tell one alot about a ng
    poster and if they are crappy.

    What goes around comes around Bob.



    --

    Charles
    The significant problems we face cannot be solved
    at the same level of thinking we were at when we
    created them. Albert Einstein
     
  17. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    > human being.
    >
    > Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >
    > Pastorio


    I find one quote from this article a little disturbing:
    "When dinner was over, Rosemond felt compelled to apologize to the waiter on
    the way out. "I said, 'Please forgive my friend for acting like that.' It's
    embarrassing. They go into rages for simple mistakes like forgetting an
    order."
    Simple mistakes don't include forgetting an order. Simple mistakes might be
    getting the wrong drink or not refilling a coffee fast enough. Forgetting
    an order?! Hardly.

    A server is supposed to write the order down. If the kitchen doesn't
    deliver, it's one thing and the server should know it's not been done and
    should apologize to the customer. It's totally different if the server is
    so overwhelmed (taken in context with this article) to be serving a
    celebrity as to completely forget their job, which is, to take the order and
    make sure it's delivered. If it isn't, the customer certainly has the right
    to get pissy about bad service.

    Jill
     
  18. On 14 Apr 2006 20:01:55 -0700, "Ginny Tadrzynski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I think the usenet reference was accurate. I used to work in insurance
    >on a phone line for senior citizens. One overtly obnoxious jerk
    >screamed at me that 'I thought he was an asshole because he was 65'.
    >My comment back to him, although it was not PC, I felt was accurate,
    >was that 'No sir, I don't think that because you are 65, chances are
    >very good that you were one at 45 as well.'


    LOL! I wubs you!

    Carol
    --

    Some people are like Slinkies... they don't really have a purpose but
    they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    Stolen from "traid" on the IRC
     
  19. On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 18:38:22 -0400, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> rummaged among random neurons and opined:

    >
    >"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    >> human being.
    >>
    >> Hard to tell which defines the other.

    >
    >Hey, I made that observation here years ago. On a date?
    >Watch how the other person treats the waiter.
    >

    Not just waitstaff. Watch how the other person treats a shop clerk or
    checker at the market. I was at Kinko's recently when some woman was
    just laying out the clerk for an error on her order. He hadn't
    processed the order, he was not a manager, he was a kid at the counter
    who just fetched and wrote down orders. I butted in and asked her if
    she thought her behavior was appropriate given that the kid had no
    power to do anything that would *fix* her order. She just glared at me
    and stormed out. Some peoples' children...

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "Most vigitaryans I iver see looked enough like their food to be
    classed as cannybals."

    Finley Peter Dunne (1900)

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  20. Charles Quinn wrote:

    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>Works 100% of the time in my experience. Crappy to the server? Crappy
    >>human being.
    >>Hard to tell which defines the other.
    >>http://tinyurl.com/o5c5e
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > Doing a google groups search on Pastorio can tell one alot about a ng
    > poster and if they are crappy.
    > What goes around comes around Bob.


    If you'd like to say what you really mean without just throwing hints,
    perhaps we can discuss it. Maybe include the standards against which
    you're measuring... whatever it is you're measuring.

    It feels like you're condemning, but timidly. Say what it is that you're
    not-quite asserting with content-filled, declarative sentences that are
    really explanatory. I might even agree with you and offer you a nice
    candy bar or something nutritious, who knows?

    Pastorio
     
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