chain changing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dhk2, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Sounds like you have a worn cassette. The cog profiles wear along with the chain. Have found I need to change the cassette with every second chain, about 10k miles. Letting the chain go much beyond the 1% wear point could wear out the cassette sooner.
     
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  2. Tnark

    Tnark New Member

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    Agree, your cassette has worn into your old worn chain and does not like the new chain. You will need a new cassette. To get more wear out of my drivetrain, I rotate between three chains every few months, and replace them before they wear too much - that way I get multiple chain-wears out of each cassette.
     
  3. Hillrider

    Hillrider Banned

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    oic.
    so how much is a new cassette worth?

    Also i got a rusty winter cassette it got rusty after one season in the snow, how do you clean it up so its good again?
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    If it's six speeds in back, it's definitely a freewheel, not a cassette, and if it's seven speeds, it probably still is a freewheel, not a cassette.

    Freewheels generally cost $20-25. If you need specific gearing, like close-range gearing for a road bike, figure on $40 or more.

    A seven-speed cassette costs around $40.

    See your local bike shop first to make sure your shifting is in proper adjustment and then to find out exactly what kind of gear cluster you need because it will likely have to be special ordered.
     
  5. Clancy

    Clancy Banned

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    padon my ignracne but i dont know the difference between free wheel and the other
     
  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    A freewheel packages the ratcheting mechanism and the cogs into one component that screws onto the hub over the end of the axle. A cassette is just the cogs, which slide over the cassette body and are held in place by a threaded lock ring (or sometimes the last cog), which provides the ratcheting mechanism and is an integral part of the hub.

    The definitive way to tell what you have is to remove the rear wheel and look at it closely. Freewheels have two main components, the core that screws onto the hub and the shell that spins with the cogs. When you spin the cogs on a freewheel, you can see the shell spinning around the stationary core. On a hub that uses a cassette, also called a freehub, the core is inside the hub where you can't see it.

    Cassettes (freehubs) became prevalent for better bikes because they provide the closer tolerances needed for indexed shifting and more cogs, and because they provide for a stronger hub.

    These days most bikes use 8-, 9-, and 10-speed freehubs, with 5-speed freewheels on cheap discount store bikes, 6-speed freewheels on kids' bikes, and 7-speed freewheels on entry level adult bikes. Most shops don't stock freewheels for every application, but they are available. 7-speed freehubs are a rarity because it simply didn't take that long to modify the design to accommodate 8 and 9 speeds. Cassettes for some but not all 7-speed freehubs are still available.

    If you don't understand, take the wheel to a shop and they will tell you what you have.
     
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