Chain cleaning advice - elusive 'creak'

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Michael Warner, Oct 25, 2004.

  1. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Peter S wrote:
    >
    > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic bits
    > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me days to
    > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > >

    > Thats a good one - truly elusive!


    When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    click each time the magnet passed the sensor.

    So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    yep, it's counting again.

    Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?

    3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    normal.

    Tam
     


  2. Peter S

    Peter S Guest

    >>I'm trying to find the source of a creaking
    >> | noise when I apply a lot of force to the pedals and especially when I'm
    >> out
    >> | of the saddle pushing hard uphill. I've just tested how tight the crank
    >> | bolts are (don't have a torque wrench but I couldn't budge them any
    >> tighter
    >> | with a long handled allen key). Removed and greased the chainring bolts
    >> | tonight and noticed that the chain could probably do with a clean. I do
    >> | regularly lubricate with Pedros Ice Wax but it's looking pretty grimy.
    >> |
    >> | BTW any idea how long I can expect out of a chain. I've got Campagnonlo
    >> | Veloce and the chain is a Campy C9 which has done about 2000km.


    >
    > I've removed the pedals and regreased the threads - no difference. I spoke
    > to the mechanic at the place I bought the bike from (6 months). Tomorrow
    > he's going to investigate the bottom bracket which is his bet as well.
    > Thanks to everyone for the advice, I'll follow up and let you know what
    > the solution is whan it's found.
    >
    > With so many replies it's plainly not unusual to develop the 'squeaks'
    > but the solution is elusive!
    >
    > Peter S
    > [email protected]


    The bottom bracket was removed and threads greased and reassembled. I don't
    know if the cranks were greased prior to refitting or not. Just back from a
    5km ride to see if the noise has gone. Ah, what a balmy QUIET, warm evening
    in Perth tonight. Couldn't generate a squeak no matter how hard i tried. So
    all who guessed bottom bracket were on the money.

    Thanks again for all the feedback. I've learned a little bit more!
    --
    Peter S
    [email protected]
     
  3. Gags

    Gags Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Peter S wrote:
    > >
    > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    bits
    > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    days to
    > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > >

    > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    >
    > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    >
    > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > yep, it's counting again.
    >
    > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    >
    > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > normal.
    >
    > Tam


    Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close to
    the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    just miss each other.

    Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid where
    the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    third and cranked the "Roar Power").

    Ride On,

    Gags
     
  4. "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Peter S wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    > bits
    > > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    > days to
    > > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > > >
    > > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    > >
    > > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    > >
    > > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > > yep, it's counting again.
    > >
    > > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    > >
    > > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > > normal.
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    > sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    > clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close

    to
    > the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    > the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    > just miss each other.
    >
    > Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    where
    > the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    > mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    > tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    > third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >

    The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.

    If you have problems with your speedo you can easily check it by repeatedly
    shorting out the contacts on the speedo itself, since all you are doing is
    simulating the action of the reed switch. Most faults are from a bad
    contacts where the speedo goes in it's holder, the plating wears off the
    contacts and the metal below forms an oxide layer which is a poor conductor.
    You can clean it off but once the plating is gone the problem will recur.
    A reed switch is simply two narrow strips of ferrous material very close to
    each other, in the presence of a magnetic field they pull towards each other
    and make contact. There are variations on this. Near the reed switch, in the
    sensor, there is usually a ferrous material which helps to concentrate the
    magnetic field onto the reed switch to improve sensitivity.

    Marty
     
  5. "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Peter S wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    > bits
    > > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    > days to
    > > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > > >
    > > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    > >
    > > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    > >
    > > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > > yep, it's counting again.
    > >
    > > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    > >
    > > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > > normal.
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    > sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    > clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close

    to
    > the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    > the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    > just miss each other.
    >
    > Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    where
    > the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    > mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    > tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    > third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >

    The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.

    If you have problems with your speedo you can easily check it by repeatedly
    shorting out the contacts on the speedo itself, since all you are doing is
    simulating the action of the reed switch. Most faults are from a bad
    contacts where the speedo goes in it's holder, the plating wears off the
    contacts and the metal below forms an oxide layer which is a poor conductor.
    You can clean it off but once the plating is gone the problem will recur.
    A reed switch is simply two narrow strips of ferrous material very close to
    each other, in the presence of a magnetic field they pull towards each other
    and make contact. There are variations on this. Near the reed switch, in the
    sensor, there is usually a ferrous material which helps to concentrate the
    magnetic field onto the reed switch to improve sensitivity.

    Marty
     
  6. "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Peter S wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    > bits
    > > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    > days to
    > > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > > >
    > > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    > >
    > > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    > >
    > > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > > yep, it's counting again.
    > >
    > > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    > >
    > > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > > normal.
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    > sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    > clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close

    to
    > the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    > the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    > just miss each other.
    >
    > Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    where
    > the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    > mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    > tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    > third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >

    The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.

    If you have problems with your speedo you can easily check it by repeatedly
    shorting out the contacts on the speedo itself, since all you are doing is
    simulating the action of the reed switch. Most faults are from a bad
    contacts where the speedo goes in it's holder, the plating wears off the
    contacts and the metal below forms an oxide layer which is a poor conductor.
    You can clean it off but once the plating is gone the problem will recur.
    A reed switch is simply two narrow strips of ferrous material very close to
    each other, in the presence of a magnetic field they pull towards each other
    and make contact. There are variations on this. Near the reed switch, in the
    sensor, there is usually a ferrous material which helps to concentrate the
    magnetic field onto the reed switch to improve sensitivity.

    Marty
     
  7. "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Peter S wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    > bits
    > > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    > days to
    > > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > > >
    > > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    > >
    > > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    > >
    > > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > > yep, it's counting again.
    > >
    > > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    > >
    > > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > > normal.
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    > sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    > clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close

    to
    > the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    > the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    > just miss each other.
    >
    > Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    where
    > the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    > mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    > tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    > third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    >
    > Ride On,
    >
    > Gags
    >
    >

    The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.

    If you have problems with your speedo you can easily check it by repeatedly
    shorting out the contacts on the speedo itself, since all you are doing is
    simulating the action of the reed switch. Most faults are from a bad
    contacts where the speedo goes in it's holder, the plating wears off the
    contacts and the metal below forms an oxide layer which is a poor conductor.
    You can clean it off but once the plating is gone the problem will recur.
    A reed switch is simply two narrow strips of ferrous material very close to
    each other, in the presence of a magnetic field they pull towards each other
    and make contact. There are variations on this. Near the reed switch, in the
    sensor, there is usually a ferrous material which helps to concentrate the
    magnetic field onto the reed switch to improve sensitivity.

    Marty
     
  8. On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 09:29:44 +1000, Tamyka Bell wrote:

    > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?


    Yes, mine does it too. I presume there's a reed switch, rather than
    a solid-state Hall effect sensor, in the sensing unit.

    --
    bpo gallery at http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/mvw1/bpo
     
  9. Peter S

    Peter S Guest

    "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic bits
    > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me days to
    > work out where it was coming from :)
    >

    Thats a good one - truly elusive!
     
  10. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 at 13:00 GMT, Marty Wallace (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    > "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    > where
    >> the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    >> mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    >> tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    >> third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    >>
    >> Ride On,
    >>
    >> Gags
    >>

    > The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    > magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.


    Not necassarily. I presumed it was a solid state device -- a hall
    effect sensor. If not, I thought it might be a mercury filled switch,
    or something similar. I have listened carefully to mine, and I can't
    hear anything. I would be suprised if you can hear anything in normal
    operation. In fact, if it is loud, then it is no doubt taking precious
    energy from your forward movement.

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    I saw a slow moving, sad faced old gentleman as he bounced off the
    roof of my car. -- insurance claim
     
  11. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    TimC wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 at 13:00 GMT, Marty Wallace (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > >
    > > "Gags" <gags_44nospamatnospamtpg.com.au> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> Unless you have one of those models like I had on my dragster as a kid

    > > where
    > >> the little lug on the spokes turned a wheel on the "computer" that was
    > >> mounted on the front fork and counted revolutions of the tyre (pretty high
    > >> tech in its day and I could get it cranking when I shifted the T-Bar up to
    > >> third and cranked the "Roar Power").
    > >>
    > >> Ride On,
    > >>
    > >> Gags
    > >>

    > > The pickup uses a read switch which does make an audible click when the
    > > magnet passes by. Listen closely, some are louder than others.

    >
    > Not necassarily. I presumed it was a solid state device -- a hall
    > effect sensor. If not, I thought it might be a mercury filled switch,
    > or something similar. I have listened carefully to mine, and I can't
    > hear anything. I would be suprised if you can hear anything in normal
    > operation. In fact, if it is loud, then it is no doubt taking precious
    > energy from your forward movement.


    I tried listening carefully to mine too. And heard nothing. Until I took
    my bike into a very quiet, well acoustically-damped room (carpet, etc).
    And I didn't spin my wheel, because the noises the wheel makes (even in
    perfect condition) are louder than the click. But if you line the magnet
    and sensor and rock the wheel gently around this point, really slowly,
    you'll hear it. At least, if you've got a cateye or a sigma you will.

    T
     
  12. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Gags wrote:
    >
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Peter S wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Evan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > > One of the worst "elusive noises" I have had was the little plastic

    > bits
    > > > > at the end of a shoelace hitting the shoe each revolution. Took me

    > days to
    > > > > work out where it was coming from :)
    > > > >
    > > > Thats a good one - truly elusive!

    > >
    > > When I first got the cycle computer on my bike I didn't notice it made a
    > > click each time the magnet passed the sensor.
    > >
    > > So I'm on my way to Sydney to race, with the bike in the back of the
    > > car. I pull it out at the hotel in Forster and chuck the front wheel on
    > > to check everything is good and the computer isn't working... Oh, the
    > > sensor is twisted. I put it back where it goes and check the computer,
    > > yep, it's counting again.
    > >
    > > Then in my quiet hotel room, I hear a disturbing little click that I
    > > hadn't noticed before. What is that, it happens each rev, is it normal?
    > >
    > > 3 panicked phone calls later I felt like a real idiot, of course it was
    > > normal. The scary part was that my coach actually had no idea it was
    > > normal.
    > >
    > > Tam

    >
    > Errr.....if that 'click' is from the magnet on the spokes clipping the
    > sensor then it is not normal. The magnet does not have to and should not
    > clip the sensor as it passes. The magnetic field only has to pass close to
    > the sensor (or any wire) in order for it to induce an electric current in
    > the wire. Your computer sensor and magnet should be set up so that they
    > just miss each other.

    <snip>

    Oh thanks for that. I must have misplaced my dunce's hat. Oh there it
    is, I left it with my physics degree.

    (yes, I did check they weren't contacting, and yes, I do know that the
    closer they are, the stronger the field)

    T
     
  13. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "TimC" <[email protected]
    > Not necassarily. I presumed it was a solid state device -- a hall
    > effect sensor. If not, I thought it might be a mercury filled switch,
    > or something similar. I have listened carefully to mine, and I can't
    > hear anything. I would be suprised if you can hear anything in normal
    > operation. In fact, if it is loud, then it is no doubt taking precious
    > energy from your forward movement.


    Marty is right - with regard to all of the speedos
    I've used, at least. There is definately a subtle "click"
    when the switch (whatever sort, I presumed 'reed')
    goes by. It's not the magnet clipping the sensor.

    Do any computers actually use a different sort of
    switch? I remember seeing a setup ages ago that
    had a circular magnet or sensor(?) rather than a
    small magnet on one spoke. I think they claimed
    a more accurate output because it was sensing at
    more than one location during the wheel's rotation.

    hippy
     
  14. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    hippy wrote:
    >
    > "TimC" <[email protected]
    > > Not necassarily. I presumed it was a solid state device -- a hall
    > > effect sensor. If not, I thought it might be a mercury filled switch,
    > > or something similar. I have listened carefully to mine, and I can't
    > > hear anything. I would be suprised if you can hear anything in normal
    > > operation. In fact, if it is loud, then it is no doubt taking precious
    > > energy from your forward movement.

    >
    > Marty is right - with regard to all of the speedos
    > I've used, at least. There is definately a subtle "click"
    > when the switch (whatever sort, I presumed 'reed')
    > goes by. It's not the magnet clipping the sensor.
    >
    > Do any computers actually use a different sort of
    > switch? I remember seeing a setup ages ago that
    > had a circular magnet or sensor(?) rather than a
    > small magnet on one spoke. I think they claimed
    > a more accurate output because it was sensing at
    > more than one location during the wheel's rotation.
    >
    > hippy


    Because, presumably, I wasn't going 28 kph, I was going 56 kph, but that
    was too fast for the sensor mech to keep up with, so it only got every
    second one...
    honestly...

    Oh by the way, decided not to do Forster half, because uni is
    threatening to kick me out if I don't hand in this report next week.

    Tam *pout*
     
  15. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]
    > Because, presumably, I wasn't going 28 kph, I was going 56 kph, but that
    > was too fast for the sensor mech to keep up with, so it only got every
    > second one... honestly...


    My OLD Vetta used to do that. It just wouldn't work
    over 60kph. Kinda sucks when you're trying to set PB
    speed records down hills..

    > Oh by the way, decided not to do Forster half, because uni is
    > threatening to kick me out if I don't hand in this report next week.


    Surely someone such as yourself has the "talents"
    and sharp wit needed to secure an extension? ;-)

    hippy
    "what report? it CAN'T be due TODAY?!"
     
  16. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    hippy wrote:
    >
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]

    <snip>
    > > Oh by the way, decided not to do Forster half, because uni is
    > > threatening to kick me out if I don't hand in this report next week.

    >
    > Surely someone such as yourself has the "talents"
    > and sharp wit needed to secure an extension? ;-)


    Yes I do. But they only give you TWO extensions. This would be my third.
    And head of department is not a woman I would want to sleep with. EW EW
    EW!

    T
     
  17. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]
    > hippy wrote:
    > > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]u
    > > > Oh by the way, decided not to do Forster half, because uni is
    > > > threatening to kick me out if I don't hand in this report next week.

    > >
    > > Surely someone such as yourself has the "talents"
    > > and sharp wit needed to secure an extension? ;-)

    >
    > Yes I do. But they only give you TWO extensions. This would be my third.
    > And head of department is not a woman I would want to sleep with. EW EW
    > EW!


    Yeah.. the possibility that 'Chief Extension Granter' was
    a woman did cross my mind..

    But really, it sounds like you are just making excuses..
    ;-)

    hippy
    - will be punished for his actions in the next world..
     
  18. mfhor

    mfhor New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Messages:
    450
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    No, it's a simple reed switch, and the click you hear is the little bit of metal getting all excited (p.s., if all else fails, try a Mavic magnet, they'd pull the studs and rings out of a Marilyn Manson fan at 20 paces, if the studs were made of steel which was magnetically attractable, which they're not, but if they were, it would look really cool, but maybe a bit painful).

    M "slightly sadistic, but in a nice way" H
     
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