chain cleaning

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jiyang Chen, Jun 8, 2003.

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  1. Jiyang Chen

    Jiyang Chen Guest

    Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?

    Jiyang
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in news:bc0sr3 [email protected]:

    > Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?

    Remember that you're trying to clean the rollers inside the chain. Soap isn't very effective unless
    you scrub really hard.
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> writes:
    > Using soap and water to clean chain--effective?

    In the past, I've used dish detergent & hot water with moderate success. Detergent /is/, by
    definition, degreaser.

    > Are degreasers a better way?

    Degreasers specifically for cleaning chains -- most definitely, yes. Much, much better.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Simple green works well and is much less toxic than petroleum based degreasers.

    "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?
    >
    > Jiyang
     
  5. Cori

    Cori Guest

    one of the six billion wrote:
    > Simple green works well and is much less toxic than petroleum based degreasers.
    >
    > "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?
    >>
    >>Jiyang
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >

    How often do you degrease your chain?

    Cori
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Simple green works well and is much less toxic than petroleum based degreasers.

    Paint thinner is reusable, shake chain in a plastic container, settle used solvent for next time.
     
  7. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in news:bc0sr3 [email protected]:
    >
    > > Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?
    >
    > Remember that you're trying to clean the rollers inside the chain. Soap isn't very effective
    > unless you scrub really hard.
    >

    As I recall from one of Jobst's lectures, water itself will clean your chain while it is turning, at
    least. You don't have to worry about soapy water not getting into your chain. It's getting it out
    that'll be the problem. Fling!

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  8. Larry Schudt

    Larry Schudt Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jun 2003 14:32:07 GMT, "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >As I recall from one of Jobst's lectures, water itself will clean your chain while it is turning,
    >at least. You don't have to worry about soapy water not getting into your chain. It's getting it
    >out that'll be the problem. Fling!

    Last time I degreased my chain, I rinsed it thoroughly in clean water, then stuck it in the oven for
    an hour at 250 degrees F. It came out quite clean, dry, and ready for lube. To reply by e-mail, be
    polite. Rudeness is unnecessary.
     
  9. Jiyang Chen

    Jiyang Chen Guest

    What's the proper way to use ProLink lubes? I apply, backpedal, and wipe, a few times to "flush the
    old lube out", as the direction says. I lube until the runoff is gray or clear, and wipe dry, and
    leave overnight. The next day I ride, and the chain is black and dirty again... Am i doing
    something wrong?

    Do I have to repeat the whole process (relubing a couple of times to flush the old lube out) over
    after I clean a chain? Or can I simply lube once, backpedal, and wipe?

    Jiyang

    "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Using soap and water to clean chain--effective? Are degreasers a better way?
    >
    > Jiyang
     
  10. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Jiyang Chen" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > What's the proper way to use ProLink lubes? I apply, backpedal, and wipe, a few times to "flush
    > the old lube out", as the direction says. I lube until the runoff is gray or clear, and wipe dry,
    > and leave overnight. The next day I ride, and the chain is black and dirty again... Am i doing
    > something wrong?

    Wipe the chain again the next day. The chain is not going to be shiney spotless, though.
     
  11. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    After reading the FAQ item:

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8d.2.html

    I noticed there is still something missing and that FAQ, that being "What is that ugly black stuff
    on the chain?" It is worn chain steel, almost all of which comes from pin and sleeve wear, the wear
    that shows up as pitch elongation. A chain that doesn't produce black particles is a chain that does
    not wear. The rate of wear being primarily dependent on how clean the chain is internally. It has
    little to do with external cleanliness, the place that gets the most attention on chains.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  12. On Mon, 09 Jun 2003 23:10:13 +0000, jobst.brand wrote:

    > The rate of wear being primarily dependent on how clean the chain is internally. It has little to
    > do with external cleanliness, the place that gets the most attention on chains.

    As a small testiment to that, I was watching the local coverage/hype for the
    US-Pro/bank-name-of-the-week race last Sunday here in Philadelphia. It showed a team mechanic,
    apparently well-paid for his work, cleaning the chain on a bike. Chain was on the bike. He was
    drizzling oil on the chain and wiping it down with a rag, thus making sure to embed lots of
    grit inside.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a _`\(,_ | conclusion. --
    George Bernard Shaw (_)/ (_) |
     
  13. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David L. Johnson writes:

    >> The rate of wear being primarily dependent on how clean the chain is internally. It has little to
    >> do with external cleanliness, the place that gets the most attention on chains.

    > As a small testament to that, I was watching the local coverage/hype for the
    > US-Pro/bank-name-of-the-week race last Sunday here in Philadelphia. It showed a team mechanic,
    > apparently well-paid for his work, cleaning the chain on a bike. Chain was on the bike. He was
    > drizzling oil on the chain and wiping it down with a rag, thus making sure to embed lots of
    > grit inside.

    Tribology is a mystery to many engineers let alone bicycle mechanics. Friction and wear seem to be
    unnatural to the human thinking.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
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