chain quick-link



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Scott C

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Last night I used my chain tool for the 1st time and removed 2 pins, and inserted a quick-link. It
was painless. Upon inserting the quick-link (and I got the 8 speed one for the bike) it was very
hard to close, due to the width of the original chain. I finally got it started (to close) and then
pushed the pedal fairly hard to close the quick-link all the way. My issue is, it may not come
apart! Is there a best way to remove this quick-link? My thinking now is I will have to get the
chain in such a way as to get pliers on the link to push it together - but this does not sound like
the right way.

Suggestions?

Thanks

Scott
 
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Pete Biggs

Guest
Scott C wrote:
> Last night I used my chain tool for the 1st time and removed 2 pins, and inserted a quick-link.

What make? SRAM?

> It was painless. Upon inserting the quick-link (and I got the 8 speed one for the bike) it was
> very hard to close

Did you have any slack in the chain? Much easier with chain off the chainrings (then hook back on
after chain has been joined).

>, due to the width of the original chain.

Is it an 8-speed chain?

> I finally got it started (to close) and then pushed the pedal fairly hard to close the quick-link
> all the way. My issue is, it may not come apart! Is there a best way to remove this quick-link? My
> thinking now is I will have to get the chain in such a way as to get pliers on the link to push it
> together - but this does not sound like the right way.

I find SRAM/Sachs/Sedis Powerlinks easy to fit and remove with fingers and thumbs alone. I have not
had to resort to plyers. A gritty chain may make it more difficult - but I've yet to experience that
problem myself, even with dirty chain.

There's a knack to removing. Links must be squeezed in and pushed together hard, and wiggled, all at
the same time. You should get it with a bit of practice - which is worth doing now!

~PB
 
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Peter Cole

Guest
"Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Last night I used my chain tool for the 1st time and removed 2 pins, and inserted a quick-link. It
> was painless. Upon inserting the quick-link (and I got the 8 speed one for the bike) it was very
> hard to close, due to the width of the original chain. I finally got it started (to close) and
> then pushed the pedal fairly hard to close the quick-link all the way. My issue is, it may not
> come apart! Is there a best way to remove this quick-link? My thinking now is I will have to get
> the chain in such a way as to get pliers on the link to push it together - but this does not sound
> like the right way.

Some of them are really hard to remove, you may need pliers. The good news is that they become
easier to remove as they wear. Make sure you don't have a tight link now.
 
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Paul Kopit

Guest
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 16:14:07 GMT, "Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I finally got it started (to close) and then pushed the pedal fairly hard to close the quick-link
>all the way. My issue is, it may not come apart! Is there a best way to remove this quick-link? My
>thinking now is I will have to get the chain in such a way as to get pliers on the link to push it
>together - but this does not sound like the right way.
>
>Suggestions?

I've been successful with bending a spoke into a "V" and inserting the spoke between the links that
need to be pushed together. Squeeze the spoke and put a little pressure on a needle nose pliers and
the link opens.

Most often I don't need the spoke at all. I shoot the spoke with carbuerator cleaner and use my
fingers. The newer links seem to work more smoothly than the older ones.
 
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Scott C

Guest
Thanks for the replies.. I'll give it more of a try..

> What make? SRAM?

*** Yes

> Is it an 8-speed chain?

*** Yes
 
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Werehatrack

Guest
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 16:14:07 GMT, "Scott C" <[email protected]> may have said:

>Last night I used my chain tool for the 1st time and removed 2 pins, and inserted a quick-link. It
>was painless. Upon inserting the quick-link (and I got the 8 speed one for the bike) it was very
>hard to close, due to the width of the original chain. I finally got it started (to close) and then
>pushed the pedal fairly hard to close the quick-link all the way. My issue is, it may not come
>apart! Is there a best way to remove this quick-link? My thinking now is I will have to get the
>chain in such a way as to get pliers on the link to push it together - but this does not sound like
>the right way.
>
>Suggestions?

Some mass-market bikes come with chains that act like this; the SRAM links are hard to latch on
them, but they *will* latch, and they don't bind in my experience. The links latch onto a better
grade of chain a bit more readily, but the difference is really not all that much. Unlatching them
is a bit tricky the first few times. It's easier if you have a pair of really narrow needlenose
pliers to stick into the link and squeeze the rollers toward each other, but those jaws need to be
narrow enough that they don't put *any* sideforce on the link or you may bend the sideplates; this
is Generally Recognized As Bad. With a bit of experimentation, you can probably find (as I did) ways
of using whatever's at hand to unlatch the link. My favorite method now is to pull the chain around
to where the link is toward the front of the big ring on the chainwheel, drop the pulled section
into the teeth with the connector link sticking up in a V, and then give it a bit of a nudge in the
right direction with a stick, a pocket screwdriver, or some other not terribly blunt instrument.
I've done it with my car keys. After you have a few miles on the link, the process gets a lot
easier. I've become a big believer in those SRAM connectors; they make working on the chain just
entirely too easy.

--
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don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
 
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