Chain replacement - Dura Ace

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by BullGod, Nov 13, 2007.

  1. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    I am going to make my first attempt at chain removal (DA 9 speed) and replacement tonight.

    How difficult a job is this? Is there a link online that someone knows of that explains and illustrates how to do this with the chain tool?

    Or can someone give me some tips?

    How do I get the old one off, for instance?

    Thanks....
     
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  2. kleng

    kleng New Member

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    Have a look at Park Tool

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=25
     
  3. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    http://www.parktool.com/repair/

    Click on the relevant bike part to get illustrated instructions. Shimano also have good instructions - you may have to hunt a bit for 9-speed Dura-Ace as it's no longer current.

    http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/index.jsp

    Once you've got the chain off, you may want to consider a removable, re-usable link system rather than messing around with pins. I rate the Connex Wipperman series - have used them for years and never had a problem. Break the chain in ten seconds and almost as quick to re-fit

    http://www.deanwoods.com.au/store/prod2414.htm
     
  4. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    Thanks for this.

    One thing, is the connecting pin included with the new chain? or must I buy it seperately? or do I remove it from the old chain and reinsert it in the new?
     
  5. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    No, you must use a fresh pin (which may come with a new chain, or you can buy from a bike shop or online. Get a couple just in case). If you break the chain again at a later date, push out a different pin from the first one. (You'll be able to tell, the replacement one will look slightly different from the ones that came as part of the original chain.)

    If you get a new chain, chances are you will have to shorten it to match your current chain.
     
  6. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    this sounds tricky....I was hoping that this would be a 10 minute easy job....need to learn to do this myself though as it's a monthly job.

    what exactly can go wrong when you put the pin in?
     
  7. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    It's not that tricky once you've done it a few times; probably the worst thing that can go wrong is that you get the whole thing misaligned in the tool and bend one of the links. Or you push the replacement pin too far and then have to push it right through and start again with another one.

    Like I say, Connex Wippermans removable connectors rule...:) They just make it so easy to take the chain off for cleaning or anything. No pins, no tools, just twist with your fingers. They're only $10 or so and they last for ever (well for ages anyway).

    http://www.deanwoods.com.au/store/prod2414.htm
     
  8. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    I actually have one of those tools - How much easier does this make it? How do I do it?

    sorry for the questions. I am very good at riding a bike (elite) but hopeless at bike maintenance (2 left hands)
     
  9. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    It makes it a huge amount easier. Particularly if you're going to swap chains around frequently like it sounds like you're going to do.

    Have a look at http://www.connexchain.com/ then click on Products>Connectors>9-speed>"See How it's done" for a Flash demo.

    The first time, you have to prepare the chain by removing one wide link so you're left with narrow links at each end of the chain - you can see the chain in the demo is like that. (The removable link acts like a wide chain link to join the narrow ones.) You do this with the normal pin removal tool. Then you thread the chain through the chain-rings and derailleurs like you would if you were going to join the ends with a pin. To make it easier, slip the chain off the front ring so there won't be any tension on the rear derailleur when you try and join the ends. Then bring the chain ends together, bring the two halves of the link together at right angles like in the demo, push together and straighten it out. (You can practice it first with the chain off the bike if you want.)

    Make sure the link goes in the right way round. The pointy bit on the heart-shaped cutout goes to the outside of the chain. Also make sure the link you have is the right one and not 8-speed or 10-speed.

    Removal is the reverse of fitting - bend the chain at right angles and push the link together so the two halves slide into the area where they will separate.

    I don't know if there are any restrictions on using the link if you are very heavy - I'm not so have never had a problem.
     
  10. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    Am I correct in assuming that if i use the connexchain tool I don 't need to use the shimano "pin"? I simply have the chain ending in two "narrow" ends and then use that connecting device?




     
  11. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    It's not a 10 minute job, more like 5 minutes. Replace your chain once a month? What the heck? How many miles are you riding????
     
  12. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    Yes, the Connex link has the pins built in (one pin in each half of the link). No need for any others.

    Maybe he's just swapping wheels around and keeping a chain with each wheel so that the chain/cassette combination remains the same. Or just for cleaning the frame and RD - it's easier if you can whip the chain off which you tend not to bother to do if you're using pins.
     
  13. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    2,000km a month on average.....I've read you should change the chain every 1,000 miles or so.
     
  14. LeDomestique

    LeDomestique New Member

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    You are riding 2000Km a month??. That's like 70Km / day ! Is that commuting or racing / training?

    Chains last anywhere from 100 to 10000 K depending on use, weahter, maintenance, luck, etc. Most people would get from 3000 to 6000 Ks out of a well maintained chain.
     
  15. BullGod

    BullGod New Member

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    I ride on an elite amateur team in Holland. Winter training right now is typically 3/4 x 2hr trainer sessions in the working week and then 2 x 4.5hr rides on weekend. Also commute 90 minutes a day.

    From jan work stops and looking at 20hrs a week - that's at least 600km a week, so 2400 a month. If a week in season has 2 classics in it that's already 400km outside of training. That kind of stretches a chain really quick. I screwed up a cassette and chainring in just 3 months last year. That was an expensive repair!
     
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