chain ring mods? low cog grind!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Feb 17, 2005.

  1. Reading several comments centering on chain friction increases from
    excessive chain angles running across to the small gear cluster cogs,
    increases to the point where many feel the small or in some cases the
    large cog are avoided.

    I get the same rrrrrrrrr feeling -the wear on chain and gears running
    downhill in high is unacceptable given the short term result.

    And I have an old bike with a 3S axle setup for a ten speed-5 cog rear
    cluster. But the other posters can't be running the same setup so I
    get the idea the problem is more general than specific to the 3S/5cog
    rear cluster upgraded to 3S/8cog rear cluster.

    Everything on the rebuilt sport tourer works but not the chain angle to
    the rear cluster small cogs from the 53CR.

    Does a triple CR solve or ameliorate the angle/friction wear problem?
    Can a triple be shimmed to reduce the angle to acceptable no chain
    grind levels when running a new chain.

    In getting around to solving the problem (one at a time, right?), I
    thought of the Sierra Club's touring guide wherein an "Alpine
    Triple" is described: two hi tooth count CR's, 54/47?/X for a close
    ratio transmission. The 54 gets shimmed out a wee bit more for
    zzooooooooooooooooommmsplatt following the UPS trucks down the
    inter-coastal bridge. Odd, before I thought of the Alpine triple as an
    uphill setup.

    The experienced LBS technician's know how to set this up with a 2 CR
    or 3CR/alpine and critique?
     
    Tags:


  2. [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > Reading several comments centering on chain friction increases from
    > excessive chain angles running across to the small gear cluster cogs,
    > increases to the point where many feel the small or in some cases the
    > large cog are avoided.
    >
    > I get the same rrrrrrrrr feeling -the wear on chain and gears running
    > downhill in high is unacceptable given the short term result.


    You need to ride fixed.
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Reading several comments centering on chain friction increases from
    > excessive chain angles running across to the small gear cluster cogs,
    > increases to the point where many feel the small or in some cases the
    > large cog are avoided.
    >
    > I get the same rrrrrrrrr feeling -the wear on chain and gears running
    > downhill in high is unacceptable given the short term result.
    >
    > And I have an old bike with a 3S axle setup for a ten speed-5 cog rear
    > cluster. But the other posters can't be running the same setup so I
    > get the idea the problem is more general than specific to the 3S/5cog
    > rear cluster upgraded to 3S/8cog rear cluster.
    >
    > Everything on the rebuilt sport tourer works but not the chain angle to
    > the rear cluster small cogs from the 53CR.
    >
    > Does a triple CR solve or ameliorate the angle/friction wear problem?
    > Can a triple be shimmed to reduce the angle to acceptable no chain
    > grind levels when running a new chain.
    >
    > In getting around to solving the problem (one at a time, right?), I
    > thought of the Sierra Club's touring guide wherein an "Alpine
    > Triple" is described: two hi tooth count CR's, 54/47?/X for a close
    > ratio transmission. The 54 gets shimmed out a wee bit more for
    > zzooooooooooooooooommmsplatt following the UPS trucks down the
    > inter-coastal bridge. Odd, before I thought of the Alpine triple as an
    > uphill setup.
    >
    > The experienced LBS technician's know how to set this up with a 2 CR
    > or 3CR/alpine and critique?
    >


    What size high gear cassette cog? 'Rumbling' chain noises
    under load, a feeling of 'roughness' are often associated
    with very small ( 12t, 11t) high gear cogs.

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
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