Chain set

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Bunndy, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. Bunndy

    Bunndy New Member

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    Hi guys

    new to the world of cycling, and have set myself a challenge of a tri Athlon next year i am looking to buy a new bike,not just for the tri but for social cycling.

    living in a rural area, i need a bike for hill and flats, i am a very large man so as you can gather i struggle going up the hills alot! but get the benefit of going down them :) . so was needing a bike that would be good for the hills but also have plenty left in top gear. i dont understand the chain set could someone plz explain in very simple terms plz lol

    this is a bike that i was looking at but not sure if chain set would be ok for my hill riding been a big chap and struggle with the hills! https://www.evanscycles.com/saracen-avro-1-2016-road-bike-EV293203

    thanks for reading any advise would be fab
     
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  2. Andy Jennings

    Andy Jennings Member

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    Don't mean to pry but large man in what way? Height? weight? Musculature?

    I ask because that will possibly have an influence on suitability.

    Not that I feel qualified to give advice on a bike for you as I am a large guy, 265Lbs, myself and just back in to cycling a few months ago
     
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  3. Bunndy

    Bunndy New Member

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    6 ft 2 and 18 stone
     
  4. Motosonic

    Motosonic Member

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    I don't know much about this brand, but the groupset should be fine. Tiagra is a decent entry-level group. Is this a bike you're buying online and having shipped to you? If so, as CampyBob has mentioned in a few other forums, you may want to consider Ribble.. You'll probably get a better bike for the same cost.
     
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  5. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Fighting gravity is hard work.We don't know the elevation gains, steepness or lengths of your climbs...let alone how you tackle them.

    That said, it sounds like you are looking for a wide range of gear ratios for both going up and coming down.

    You might want to look at something like a 50-34 crankset coupled with a 11-28 or 11-30 cassette setup. Note: this may or may not be enough gearing for you. You'll have to try it to see how it feels.

    Even on my short and steep downhill I can easily spin out a 53 x 11 ratio so be advised there will be downhill runs that you will coast down. We all run out of gear there. Going up...that's subjective as some guys prefer spinning really low gears while the next guy might prefer to grind hid way up in a taller ratio.
     
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  6. Bunndy

    Bunndy New Member

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    Thanks for reply

    I live in North Yorkshire so the terrain can be very hilly, I will be riding too and from work which is about 18 miles one way it's fairly flat, with a mile at 14% ratio, then when I ride for pleasure, eg weekends this would be with friends they would usally do a 40 mile ride and include the cow and calf climb. I know that I would struggle with this as very poor and slow on hills and I think that is a 19.5% so looking for a setup that will make the climb a little easier. I do understand I have to grid it out but been so big makes it that bit harder!
     
  7. CyclingJunkies

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    Not everyone is a grinder - if you haven't already tried it, lower your gear to increase your cadence (crank RPM); you may find it feels more natural or you may need a bit of time to adjust (it might feel too spinny and it's a bit more cardio intensive so you can feel like you're working harder than usual) but you may also find that you can climb for longer and your legs feel less lead-like when you finish (and recover quicker). A bike computer / Garmin / etc. with a cadence sensor will help you.

    As per @CAMPYBOB's advice, a compact 11-speed will probably serve you well and provide most of the gearing you'll need, and there are a good number of them available around the £1000 mark at Evans (with some great end-of-year discounts to be had elsewhere too). A "triple" (three crank rings) might offer a bit more overall gear length to help with hills, albeit with a bit of crossover on the rear cassette, but they're not as easy to find as the market has trended towards 'compact' (two, slightly wider-spaced crank rings - gear space, not physically wider apart ... :)).

    However, the old adage bears repeating: "The only way to get better at climbing hills, is to climb hills". ;)
     
  8. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    19.5% is STEEP! Hauling 250 pounds up walls like that takes power regardless of the gear ratio.

    A 34 chainring with a 32 cassette gear yields a 28" gear. That requires a medium length cage on the rear derailleur at a minimum and I think you would find most mechanics and manufacturer specification literature recommend a long cage rear derailleur to wrap that much chain on a compact setup.

    That 28" gear would be adequate for most people to climb anything they would find themselves attempting without inducing fatigue and effort out of what would be considered 'normal' range. 'Most' is definitely not 'all' and the reason it is highly recommend the OP test ride some gearing options in his current physical condition and with a realistic assessment of where he wants to find himself in the next year or so.
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I cannot recommend that bike for you because most road bike frames/forks/wheels are made for 220 maybe 225 pounds or less of a rider, you exceed that limit, unless Evans can give you supporting documentation from the manufacture of both the frame, fork, and wheelset that they are designed to hold a 255 pound person then I would avoid the bike unless you want problems.

    Even if you find another bike that the frame and fork is designed for a 255 pound plus person, most manufactures don't supply a wheelset on those bikes that will hold that weight which means more than likely you'll be needing a specially built wheelset. I would be looking at either a hybrid, or a rigid (meaning no suspension either in the rear or fork) mountain bike. With a Hybrid you may or may not have to have a specially built wheel to hold your weight. If you need a wheelset built you will need a 36 spoke wheelset.

    Please note, there are people that weigh about in your range on bikes not intended to carry that load, sometimes they hold up, the biggest issue are the wheels, they'll last 2 to 5 thousand miles and spokes start to snap and or the rims start to crack. There is no sense in buying a bike that is marginally able to carry a load like you, for what? to save up to 4 pounds? YOU WILL NEVER NOTICE THOSE EXTRA POUNDS WHILE RIDING! Look at this way, take the weight of the bike you're looking at, add in your weight and figure out the percentage difference between that total and another say 4 pounds, the percentage is less than 1/2 of a percent!
     
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  10. Andy Jennings

    Andy Jennings Member

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    At 265lbs I have to agree about the wheel set here, I am getting a new set of wheels soon for my MTB as they keep going out of true and require adjusting. My LBS have suggested a set for me with 36 spokes.

    As to a bike I am not qualified to give advice, in my own opinion. I do ride a MTB, aluminium frame, Specialiszed.

    As for weight I personally went for strength over frame weight.
     
  11. uadialej

    uadialej New Member

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    You may want to consider Ribble.. You'll probably get a better bike for the same cost
     
  12. aperezy

    aperezy New Member

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    I am a road biker and last year I did my first tour, about 400 miles. I used an old mountain bicycle that I have but the experience was not pleasant.

    I am looking to purchase a new bike for light touring. My Fuji Altamira Is not suitable for this. I am debating between a Trek Crosstip, Fuji Jari, Kona Roveand Specialized Sequoia. All these bikes are City/Gravel bicycles and I think will fit my needs (light touring, motels, light cargo)

    Now my big doubt is the Chainring options. My selection are gravel/city Bicycles and the chainring are double (Compact and Subcompact) with the exception of the Crossrip 2016 that has a triple 50/39/30. Some uses a new SubCompact chainring I don't know enough the technical difference between compact and subcompact, what I am concern is not having the grannie gear, specially for hills when the bicycle is loaded.

    Is it worth the subcompact options 48/32? or in other words this 48/32 is enough for steep hills and long rolling hills?

    Thank you all
    Alfredo
     
  13. zaincarbon

    zaincarbon New Member

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    Carbonfan is a professional Online store who selling high quality hand-build carbon bike wheels, carbon bike rims, carbon bike frames, carbon bike handles, carbon stalks, carbon seats and other carbon bike components

    you can have a try. https://www.carbonfan.com/road-bike/road-carbon-wheels/?a=3
     
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