Chain Stay Protection

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by craigstanton, Apr 5, 2004.

  1. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Howdy,

    For those of you with expensive frames who care about chips, what product do you use to protect the frame from chain slap and cable rub? I ride a very expensive steel frame, and I want it to last . . . so if possible I try to avoid nicks and scrapes. I have tried the Lizard Skins carbon patches, and can't get them to stick for anything. I find them to be more or less worthless. More creatively, I have also tried the clear tape that is supposed to protect tennis racket heads from scraping on the ground. This works pretty well, but dirt tends to collect underneath and the tape after a few hundred miles and the tape needs to be replaced every so often.

    Is there a frame protection product out there that actually works like it's supposed to? I've had many people recommend using an old tire to protect the chainstay, but it seems to go against my aesthetic sensibilities to tie a ratty old tire to my custom steel frame.

    Thanks for the info ahead of time.

    Craig
     
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  2. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    The LizardSkins product is a piece of durable fabric hat wraps around the chainstay and has a velcro closure. I've been using the things for years and they work great. Tey protect the chainstay and quiet chain-slap. I have no idea why you've had trouble getting them to stick? Or why you've found them to be worthless. They take ten seconds to install and seem to last forever. They're ugly but effective. JMHO.
     
  3. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Yeah. Sounds like we're talking about different products. I am talking about the carbon fiber patches . . . NOT the fabric/velcro wrap.
     
  4. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    Yeah, I guess we are talking about two different things. You might want to give the thing I'm talking about a try. Like I said, not real pretty but they work. I think they come in a few different sizes for standard size and oversized chainstays.

    Here's a link:

    http://www.lizardskins.com/chainstay.html
     
  5. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Is this an off-road frame? For road-riding in general, I've always found the clear 3M chainstay protectors to be tough enough, and and stay clean enough.
     
  6. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    This isn't an off-road frame, it's a Landshark steel road frame. The frame is almost new, but even after just a few weeks of riding (350 to 400 miles) there's already one or two nicks on the inner chainstay - down to the steel. I will look for the 3M chainstay protectors at my LBS. Thanks.
     
  7. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Protecting that steel is absolutely crucial, as you probably already know. While you hunt for the right protection, you might consider touching those nicks with either a little paint or a few dabs of a good clearcoat; even in the driest climate, you don't want to risk compromising that Landshark.

    Sounds like a nice ride. Pictures?
     
  8. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Hi Lok,

    Thanks. I already did a quick touch up with black paint. Here is a link. The color in these pics is a bit washed out, but these'll give you the idea. Here are the pics currently posted on the Landshark website:

    http://www.landsharkbicycles.com/Gallery/Stanton.html
     
  9. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Sharp, Craig. Very cool. Landsharks are on my list of Bikes I'd Buy if I Could Justify a Few More. Have fun with that thing!
     
  10. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Thx Lok. I am biased, but I highly recommend Landshark. Mine has carbon (ouzo pro) forks, and the frame is made of deda zero uno. I love it. I've been lurking in the hills lately on training rides, prepping for a century with some cat 1 climbs . . . and I am very impressed with the feel of this frame climbing. It's also very comfortable. An all around great frame.
     
  11. acjaz

    acjaz New Member

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    I've had a landshark for over 10 years, John Slawta is a really nice guy too. For an inexpensive chainguard here's what I do. Take an intertube and slice it to make a long rubber strip. Tightly wrap the rubber around the chainstay and wrap the ends with electrical tape. It doesn't look too bad and is practically bombproof.
     
  12. armchair_spacem

    armchair_spacem New Member

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    If you like shiny stuff, there's a light aluminium stick-on chainstay protector floating around embossed with either shimano or campagnolo logo - these look nice and stick well, come pre-curved and with a heavy duty mounting tape . They're not cheap as these things go (about$15 aussie) but they look slick and they last. I also ride a very expensive custom steel frame and I'm fussy about protecting it.
     
  13. dorian

    dorian New Member

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    There used to be a clear chainstay protector made by Stay-Tuff that is bomber, super sticky stuff. It also used to come with frame protectors for cable rub. They're hard to find now, but here's all the stuff your LBS can get from QBP

    http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=49&Category=482

    I have the Dimension framesavers on my frame to protect against cable rub. They stick well. The Dimension stuff is thinner than the Stay-Tuff was, but it's all you can get now.

    People have posted that the sticky self laminating sheets you can get from office supply stores works well. You can cut it however you want.

    Your frame should be protected by the primer which any chips are very unlikely to penetrate, but a little clear nail polish to cover a nick never hurts.
     
  14. chris_gr

    chris_gr New Member

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    OK I admit it is low tech but I use a piece of clear hockey sock tape (probably only available in Canada and the Northern US) but is works great, tough and easy to replace.
     
  15. acjaz

    acjaz New Member

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    The problem with tape and thin plastics is that the chain can still impact through the tape. When you go to remove the tape it can also remove some of the paint which is loosened by the impacts. I've found you need something made of rubber or foam to really prevent it the chain from damaging the paint. WTB used to make a rubber strip you could apply to the chainstay.
     
  16. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Hi acjaz,

    Thanks for the note. Glad to hear from a Landshark veteran. I hope to keep this ride for years to come, and I am always encouraged by riders who've been pushing their Landshark for 10+ years. John Slawta is first-rate. Very friendly, very knowledgable, customer oriented.

    Craig
     
  17. craigstanton

    craigstanton New Member

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    Thanks all around. It seems there are many options. Ya'll saved me a good deal of time. Thanks again.

    Craig
     
  18. dobber

    dobber New Member

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    I've used good old fashion electrical tape with great results. Of late, I put down a base layer with run of the mill black tape and then a second one of a nice frame contrasting color. The mountainbike got a base layer of fiberglass electrical tape, since it was more prone to slap.

    Once in a while I've gotten goofy (or was it drunk) and weaved a pattern with two colors.

    I've also used some of the vinyl old-school handlebar wrap.
     
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