Chain

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mr John X, Jun 29, 2003.

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  1. Mr John X

    Mr John X Guest

    I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The chain was split by driving
    out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain I am wondering if there is any need to
    'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it. The pin steel is very hard and I dont think it would be
    very easy to reshape it at all. Any advice out there ??????
     
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  2. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Mr John X must be edykated coz e writed:

    > I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The chain was split by driving
    > out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain I am wondering if there is any need to
    > 'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it. The pin steel is very hard and I dont think it would
    > be very easy to reshape it at all. Any advice out there ??????
    >
    >
    Usually they do not need to be shroomed, a chain splitting tool will push it back into place.

    Ian
     
  3. Msa

    Msa Guest

    "Mr John X" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The
    chain
    > was split by driving out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain
    I
    > am wondering if there is any need to 'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it. The pin steel is
    > very hard and I dont think it would be very
    easy
    > to reshape it at all. Any advice out there ??????
    >
    >

    As far as I'm aware, just driving it home flush will be just fine.

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
  4. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Mr John X wrote:
    > I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The chain was split by driving
    > out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain I am wondering if there is any need to
    > 'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it. The pin steel is very hard and I dont think it would
    > be very easy to reshape it at all. Any advice out there ??????

    This one really depends on what chain you have. Different chain manufacturers recomend different
    things e.g. Shimano say that you should purchase a special black pin to insert when re-joining one
    of their chains. Other manufacturers include removable links to enable you to break and re-join the
    chain without tools. These links are usually specific to that manufacturers chains. The clue to the
    chain manufacturer may well be any letters or symbols on the chain links themselves. Without knowing
    that, it is difficult to say what to do, other than you are correct that it will be difficult to
    "mushroom" the link pin. If there are no clues to the manufacturer, you're into suck it and see
    territory.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.

    Aye!.
     
  5. Mr John X

    Mr John X Guest

    > --
    > Mark
    >
    > "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
    >
    > A 9 minute reply can't be too far behind either- thanks
    Mark H
     
  6. Mr John X wrote:
    >
    > I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The chain was split by driving
    > out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain I am wondering if there is any need to
    > 'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it. The pin steel is very hard and I dont think it would
    > be very easy to reshape it at all. Any advice out there ??????

    only tool out there I know off to mushroom the ends is the Rohloff revolver. Nice, but it probably
    cost the same as your respray. A sram chain will be much better value!
    --
    Marten
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Mr John X wrote:
    > I recently split the chain on my road bike to carry out a respray. The chain was split by driving
    > out one of the pins.Now it's time to refit the chain I am wondering if there is any need to
    > 'mushroom' the ends of the pin to retain it.

    Should be no need if the pin is re-positioned correctly and plates are undamaged.

    I recommend using a SRAM Powerlink to rejoin instead, though. ...A wonderful simple invention: means
    you don't need any tools to break or join a chain (once initially shortened to the correct length;
    see www.sram.com). They can be used with just about any brand of derailleur chain if the appropriate
    speed one is bought.

    ~PB
     
  8. Mike K Smith

    Mike K Smith Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > I recommend using a SRAM Powerlink to rejoin instead, though. ...A wonderful simple invention:
    > means you don't need any tools to break or join a chain (once initially shortened to the correct
    > length; see www.sram.com). They can be used with just about any brand of derailleur chain if the
    > appropriate speed one is bought.
    I just bought a SRAM chain with a Powerlink for the first time. Are you meant to be able to fit the
    powerlink without using tools? I assembled the link, but used a pair of pliers to push the pins
    apart (along the line of the chain) to lock the pins in place.

    Similarly are you meant to be able to remove the Powerlink (pusing side-plates inward and the pins
    together) without using tools?

    The previous chain broke in use. This is the first time I have ever had a chain break, rather than
    be replaced due to wear, in over 25 years of cycling. Are chain breaks common nowadays?

    Mike
     
  9. [email protected] schreef ...

    > I just bought a SRAM chain with a Powerlink for the first time. Are you meant to be able to fit
    > the powerlink without using tools? I assembled the link, but used a pair of pliers to push the
    > pins apart (along the line of the chain) to lock the pins in place.
    >
    > Similarly are you meant to be able to remove the Powerlink (pusing side-plates inward and the pins
    > together) without using tools?

    Yes and yes, it's sort of a "trick" that requires some practice. It is hard to describe *how*
    exactly one does this, but in essence you push the Powerlink in while firmly holding the chain at
    both sides of the Link so it doesn't bend.

    --
    Regards, Marten
     
  10. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Mike K Smith wrote:
    > I just bought a SRAM chain with a Powerlink for the first time. Are you meant to be able to fit
    > the powerlink without using tools? I assembled the link, but used a pair of pliers to push the
    > pins apart (along the line of the chain) to lock the pins in place.
    >
    > Similarly are you meant to be able to remove the Powerlink (pusing side-plates inward and the pins
    > together) without using tools?

    No tools whatsoever are necessary for joining or breaking once the chain has been shortened. To use
    the Powerlink, you need two inner-plate chain ends.

    Some users do prefer to use plyers for the Powerlink but I don't see the need for it - unless
    perhaps the chain is very gritty and the link has jammed (yet to happen to mine, though).

    There's a knack to it. For joining, first it helps to dangle the chain on the bottom bracket to get
    some slack. Then attach a Powerlink bit to each end of the chain, bring together and link while
    keeping it in-line, then pull (there's no "click"). To break, keep in-line, squeeze and push links
    together hard at the same time whilst wiggling. Fingers & thumbs have to be in just the right place.
    All hard to put into words, but keep practicing. Only takes a very few seconds once got the knack.
    Brand of chain may make a difference to how tight the fit is. Make sure "speed" is correct.

    > The previous chain broke in use. This is the first time I have ever had a chain break, rather than
    > be replaced due to wear, in over 25 years of cycling. Are chain breaks common nowadays?

    Shouldn't be, but perhaps the very tight fitting pins of modern chains have something to do with it
    and chains are not always joined without damage?

    ~PB
     
  11. "Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote: ( There's a knack to it. For joining, first
    it helps to dangle the chain on ) the bottom bracket to get some slack. ...

    The right way to do anything to a chain on a derailler is to introduce some slack by putting a
    hooked length of a broken spoke about three inches long into a pair of links about five or six
    inches apart.
     
  12. Mike K Smith

    Mike K Smith Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > No tools whatsoever are necessary for joining or breaking once the chain has been shortened. To
    > use the Powerlink, you need two inner-plate chain ends.

    Thanks. I'll try to develop the knack.
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > Mike K Smith wrote:
    >> I just bought a SRAM chain with a Powerlink for the first time. Are you meant to be able to fit
    >> the powerlink without using tools? I assembled the link, but used a pair of pliers to push the
    >> pins apart (along the line of the chain) to lock the pins in place.

    Should be easy to *pull* the links into place by tugging on neighbouring links. A slack chain will
    help and make sure pins are well pressed in first. Just hook chain onto chainring afterwards.

    ~PB
     
  14. Mike K Smith

    Mike K Smith Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    > Mike K Smith wrote:

    > > The previous chain broke in use. This is the first time I have ever had a chain break, rather
    > > than be replaced due to wear, in over 25 years of cycling. Are chain breaks common nowadays?
    >
    > Shouldn't be, but perhaps the very tight fitting pins of modern chains have something to do with
    > it and chains are not always joined without damage?
    The chain which broke had slotted outer plates, and broke midway along a plate. The replacement
    chain doesn't have sloted plates. I don't care about the weight saving, and suspect that the slotted
    plates are weaker.
     
  15. Mike K Smith

    Mike K Smith Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >
    > > Mike K Smith wrote:
    > >> I just bought a SRAM chain with a Powerlink for the first time. Are you meant to be able to fit
    > >> the powerlink without using tools? I assembled the link, but used a pair of pliers to push the
    > >> pins apart (along the line of the chain) to lock the pins in place.
    >
    > Should be easy to *pull* the links into place by tugging on neighbouring links. A slack chain will
    > help and make sure pins are well pressed in first. Just hook chain onto chainring afterwards.
    I found it tricky just pulling because because the chain and my hands were slippery from the
    lubricant. I'll try harder next time!
     
  16. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I recommend using a SRAM Powerlink to rejoin instead, though.

    Seconded. It also means the chain retains its original length, assuming normally the plates get
    damaged and have to be discarded.

    Pete
     
  17. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Geraint Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote: ( There's a knack to it. For joining, first
    > it helps to dangle the
    chain on
    > ) the bottom bracket to get some slack. ...
    >
    > The right way to do anything to a chain on a derailler is to introduce some slack by putting a
    > hooked length of a broken spoke about three inches long into a pair of links about five or six
    > inches apart.

    If you never break spokes, only chains, then a length of wire coat hanger works very well, and is
    easy to cut with ordinary pliers. I have several, 'cos the little so-and-sos are hard to see in the
    bottom of a toolbox!

    BTW they can also be used for extracting the hair plug that builds up under the drain cover in your
    shower....

    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
  18. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    "Marten Hoffmann" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] schreef ...
    > > Similarly are you meant to be able to remove the Powerlink (pusing side-plates inward and the
    > > pins together) without using tools?

    Inward? If you squeeze the two plates together between finger and thumb that should be sufficient
    pressure. Then squeeze other thumb and finger on the 'top right' and 'bottom left' corners and that
    should free it. Mike
     
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