Chainring bolts

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by David James, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. David James

    David James Guest

    I have looked around and of course find different answers as I expect
    I will find here. I am feeling adventurous today so here it goes.

    When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    dab of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    loctite 242 or lubricate.

    Warm regards
    David James
     
    Tags:


  2. Kinky Cowboy

    Kinky Cowboy Guest

    On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 15:14:06 -0500, David James <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have looked around and of course find different answers as I expect
    >I will find here. I am feeling adventurous today so here it goes.
    >
    >When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    >with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    >to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    >dab of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    >loctite 242 or lubricate.
    >
    >Warm regards
    >David James



    If you're using 5 steel bolts on the road, use antiseize. If you're
    using 4 aluminium bolts off road, loctite them. For intermediate
    situations, one or other of these methods should work!


    Kinky Cowboy*

    *Batteries not included
    May contain traces of nuts
    Your milage may vary
     
  3. David James wrote:

    > When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    > with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    > to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    > dab of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    > loctite 242 or lubricate. =20


    You should absolutely, positively _not_ use Loctite on chainring bolts=20
    if you ever hope to get them apart in the future.

    Best is a drop of medium-weight oil (I use Phil Wood) on the bolt=20
    threads, making sure not to get any oil on the outside of the nuts.=20
    That way, you'll usually be able to tighten (and loosen) the bolts=20
    sufficiently without needing to hold the nuts with a pin wrench.

    Sheldon "Last Resort:=20
    http://harriscyclery.net/site/itemdetails.cfm?ID=3D545" Brown
    +-----------------------------------------------+
    | I=92m appearing as Preposteros in |
    | Gilbert & Sullivan's Thespis at M.I.T. |
    | April 9-10,15-17 http://web.mit.edu/gsp/www |
    | http://sheldonbrown.com/music.html |
    | Photos: http://sheldonbrown.org/g-s/thespis |
    +-----------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. daveornee

    daveornee Guest

    David James wrote:
    > I have looked around and of course find different answers as I expect I
    > will find here. I am feeling adventurous today so here it goes.
    > When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones with
    > the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque to
    > spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a dab
    > of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    > loctite 242 or lubricate.
    > Warm regards David James




    I think Loctite 242 covering the threads is a good idea. I would
    carefully clean external and internal threads first. I haven't tried
    them or even seen them, but the chainring bolts with Torx heads hold
    some attraction to me. By size of the threads and torque specification
    you wouldn't need grease, but if I weren't using Loctite 242 I would use
    either grease or anti-sieze compound. I am not trolling for boudreaux
    with the mention of anti-sieze.



    --
     
  5. RE/
    >Should I just torque
    >to spec,


    Toasting a series of alu chairing bolts by feel was the impetus that got me to
    buy a torque wrench.

    Now I use steel and blue LocTite - but still a torque wrench.

    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest


    >You should absolutely, positively _not_ use Loctite on chainring bolts
    >if you ever hope to get them apart in the future.
    >


    too late I just did it (G) but all it takes is a little heat to melt the loctite
    so it is not permanent.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  7. Larry Fieman

    Larry Fieman Guest

    Best is a drop of medium-weight oil (I use Phil Wood) on the bolt
    threads,


    Sheldon,
    What do you think about bees wax on chainring bolt threads?

    Regards,
    Larry
     
  8. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    > Sheldon,
    > What do you think about bees wax on chainring bolt threads?


    No no, wax only on the nipples.


    "Larry Fieman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s03...
    >
    >
    > Best is a drop of medium-weight oil (I use Phil Wood) on the bolt
    > threads,
    >
    >
    > Sheldon,
    > What do you think about bees wax on chainring bolt threads?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Larry
    >
    >
     
  9. ddjames-<< When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    dab of loctite? >><BR><BR>

    Grease onto the threads and also a wee bit onto the crank flats where the rings
    live and then tight. be careful, these are aluminum...NOT loctite, IMO-

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. David James

    David James Guest

    On Tue, 13 Apr 2004 15:14:06 -0500, David James <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have looked around and of course find different answers as I expect
    >I will find here. I am feeling adventurous today so here it goes.
    >
    >When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    >with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    >to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    >dab of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    >loctite 242 or lubricate.
    >
    >Warm regards
    >David James



    Thanks for all the replies. I have the Phil Wood lube and will go
    with that. I do have a pin wrench, but no torque wrench. I will
    tighten until reasonably snug.
    David James
     
  11. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 03:49:44 GMT, "Larry Fieman" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Best is a drop of medium-weight oil (I use Phil Wood) on the bolt
    >threads,


    they kept coming loose so I used the loctite. lots of vibrations on some of the
    bike paths.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  12. David James wrote:

    > I have looked around and of course find different answers as I expect
    > I will find here. I am feeling adventurous today so here it goes.
    >
    > When replacing the chainrings and subsequently reattaching new ones
    > with the chainring bolts (Dura Ace double 7700), Should I just torque
    > to spec, (or feel as Sheldon would advise, I think) or do I include a
    > dab of loctite? I have seen some sites indicate that I can either use
    > loctite 242 or lubricate.


    I've never, ever had them come loose. Assuming you're using stock steel
    bolts, they bite into the softer alu chainring which stops them unscrewing.
     
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