Chainrings fit any crank brand?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Urban Sherpa, May 27, 2004.

  1. Urban Sherpa

    Urban Sherpa Guest

    Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....

    I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    Ultegra instead of the C'dale.

    My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    standard/compatible?


    Thanks for the info, -Karl
     
    Tags:


  2. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Urban Sherpa wrote:
    > Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    >
    > I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    > loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    > is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    > with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    > is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    > me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    > way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    > Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
    >
    > My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    > 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    > standard/compatible?
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the info, -Karl


    If the bolt holes are in the same places they'll fit. Shimano road are
    130/74 mm PCD (Pitch Circle Diameter) meaning the bolt holes are centres on
    a circle that is 130mm in diameter for the outer two rings and 74 mm for the
    inner ring. You can measure yours to check.
     
  3. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    If it's just the left crank that needs replacing, then why purchase a
    complete crankset. Just a left crank that fits the bottom bracket will do.
    Try www.loosescrews.com.

    Nick

    "Urban Sherpa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    >
    > I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    > loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    > is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    > with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    > is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    > me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    > way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    > Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 27 May 2004 12:04:03 -0700, [email protected] (Urban Sherpa)
    wrote:
    >My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my


    My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    chainrings)?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 27 May 2004 12:04:03 -0700, [email protected] (Urban Sherpa)
    > wrote:
    > >My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my

    >
    > My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    > chainrings)?


    Anywhere- Quality Bicycle Products sells some brands as "crankarm
    sets":
    http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=49&Category=100
    None are direct replacements for Urban's setup- but then I don't know
    what's interchangeable with his Coda kit.

    Jeff
     
  6. John Rees

    John Rees Guest

    "Urban Sherpa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    | Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    |
    | I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    | loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    | is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    | with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    | is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    | me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    | way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    | Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
    |
    | My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    | 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    | standard/compatible?

    I've got a set of Coda Expert cranks I pulled off a bike for the reason
    you describe. The spline is in good shape on the crank. Make me an
    offer and I'll ship it to you.

    However, Since I had the same problem, (left crank kept getting loose),
    it made me wonder if I had the wrong bottom bracket on the bike for the
    crankarm. Since there are two different flavours of the Shimano splined
    BB, it is possible we had mismatched BB for the crank. If it's the
    deeper spline, it's possible than the crank does not seat well enough to
    stay tight and works loose.
    Didn't have the same issue on the chainring side.

    John Rees
     
  7. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Rick Onanian wrote:

    > On 27 May 2004 12:04:03 -0700, [email protected] (Urban Sherpa)
    > wrote:
    >
    >>My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my

    >
    >
    > My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    > chainrings)?


    'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (or
    several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).

    --
    Tom Sherman – Quad City Area
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 29 May 2004 05:11:40 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Rick Onanian wrote:
    >> My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    >> chainrings)?

    >
    >'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (or
    >several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).


    Maybe it _was_ sufficient, X number of years ago. However, "crank"
    has become generally accepted to mean the arms and rings, and
    sometimes even the bottom bracket. This obfuscation has necessitated
    additional detail.

    Actually, I thought it was the opposite of what you say; I thought
    "crank set" was the redundant term, leaving "crank arm" to describe
    a single component of a "crank" or "crank set".

    You may think it's all a bad thing, but it's reality, for better or
    for worse.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  9. Rick Onanian asked:

    > My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    > chainrings)?


    http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=49&Category=493

    This "a la carte" approach tends to be much more expensive than buying
    a complete crankset, but if you just need a single crank, especially a
    left one as the O.P. seeks, it can be a good way to go.

    Indeed, left cranks are very widely interchangeable among different
    brands and models unless you're hung up on matching the cosmetics of the
    right side.

    Most bike shops will stock generic left cranks for $20 or so. For some
    reason, it's left cranks that are more liable to get wrecked by riding
    them loose, so this is a common repair part.

    Sheldon "Q.B.P." Brown
    Newtonville, Massachusetts
    +----------------------------------------+
    | Promote the institution of marriage: |
    | Make it available to all adults! |
    +----------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  10. On Sat, 29 May 2004 05:11:40 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Rick Onanian wrote:
    >
    >> On 27 May 2004 12:04:03 -0700, [email protected] (Urban Sherpa)
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my

    >>
    >>
    >> My question.... where do you buy JUST the crank arms (w/o
    >> chainrings)?

    >
    >'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (or
    >several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).


    I thought that the name of the part is "crank arm" and that crank was
    a short name (and also a verb describing the action). Giant's website
    contains the following line where they use the term crank arm: "The
    URT design is an ingenious suspension system whereby the drivetrain of
    the bicycle (gears, chain, derailleurs, bottom bracket, crank arms,
    rear wheel) are all contained within the swingarm structure."


    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  11. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Michael J. Klein wrote:

    > ...
    >>'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (or
    >>several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).

    >
    >
    > I thought that the name of the part is "crank arm" and that crank was
    > a short name (and also a verb describing the action). Giant's website
    > contains the following line where they use the term crank arm: "The
    > URT design is an ingenious suspension system whereby the drivetrain of
    > the bicycle (gears, chain, derailleurs, bottom bracket, crank arms,
    > rear wheel) are all contained within the swingarm structure."


    See the following links for some crankiness (pun intended) on the subject.
    <http://groups.google.com/groups?q=crank+arm+jobst+brandt&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&c2coff=1&safe=off&selm=cwjx7.4238%24no1.47989%40typhoon.sonic.net&rnum=1>
    <http://groups.google.com/groups?q=crank+arm+jobst+brandt&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&c2coff=1&safe=off&selm=LdQ3b.16601%24dk4.543192%40typhoon.sonic.net&rnum=3>

    --
    Tom Sherman – Quad City Area
     
  12. rocketman58

    rocketman58 Guest

    My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    > 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    > standard/compatible?


    Rings will fit, but a Shimano crank arm may not fit your Cannondale's
    BB. Shimano cranks only fit Shimano BBs. Check compatability, or you
    may also need to buy a BB as well. Otherwise buy a crankset that fits
    your BB.

    You could always buy a crankset with rings. Install your old rings on
    the crank, and sell the new rings as a set on ebay. That may be the
    most cost effective way to go.
     
  13. Gary Young

    Gary Young Guest

    [email protected] (Urban Sherpa) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    >
    > I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    > loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    > is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    > with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    > is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    > me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    > way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    > Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
    >
    > My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    > 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    > standard/compatible?
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the info, -Karl


    When you stand on the pedals, do you do so right foot forward? If so,
    this may have not been your fault but a design defect that has been
    diagnosed by Jobst Brandt. Just do a google search for "right foot
    forward" and you'll come up with many discussions of this. Shimano
    seems to have acknowledged the problem with the octolink design with
    its new generation of pinch-bolt cranks.

    If you do stand right foot forward, then why give hell to Cannondale?
     
  14. Gary Young writes:

    >> Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....


    >> I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    >> loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm
    >> (BB is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the
    >> crank bolt with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt
    >> loosens). The crank is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory
    >> or dealers won't sell me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd
    >> have to buy the set (cost way more than I should have to spend).
    >> I've decided to buy a 105, or Ultegra instead of the C'dale.


    >> My question... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will
    >> my 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    >> standard/compatible?


    > When you stand on the pedals, do you do so right foot forward? If
    > so, this may have not been your fault but a design defect that has
    > been diagnosed by Jobst Brandt. Just do a google search for "right
    > foot forward" and you'll come up with many discussions of this.
    > Shimano seems to have acknowledged the problem with the octolink
    > design with its new generation of pinch-bolt cranks.


    > If you do stand right foot forward, then why give hell to Cannondale?


    I find interesting how my explanation of this phenomenon was harshly
    criticized by the Shimano faithful who could not imagine that their
    equipment manufacturer not understanding this failing. Therefore, the
    Octalink couldn't be at fault, just as the disc brake wheel ejection
    could not occur or the Campagnolo Delta brake be dangerous. As You
    say, Shimano seems to have recognized the problem and moved to a new
    design. They could have saved themselves much trouble had they hired
    better engineers who understand these things. Fortunately, computer
    modeling of these interfaces is available now and would reveal elastic
    backlash in that design, the backlash that unscrews retaining bolts
    and mashes the pressure faces (that are too small in the first place).

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  15. Joe Riel

    Joe Riel Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > <snipped> As You
    > say, Shimano seems to have recognized the problem and moved to a new
    > design. They could have saved themselves much trouble had they hired
    > better engineers who understand these things. Fortunately, computer
    > modeling of these interfaces is available now and would reveal elastic
    > backlash in that design, the backlash that unscrews retaining bolts
    > and mashes the pressure faces (that are too small in the first place).


    Do you have reason to believe that Shimano (or others) are actually
    simulating this interface? Presumably they design it with a CAD tool
    but do they do the analysis? It seems the sort of thing that requires
    the engineer to know what to look for; but if they did, they probably
    wouldn't have made the mistake in the first place.


    Joe
     
  16. Joe Riel writes:

    >> As You say, Shimano seems to have recognized the problem and moved
    >> to a new design. They could have saved themselves much trouble had
    >> they hired better engineers who understand these things.
    >> Fortunately, computer modeling of these interfaces is available now
    >> and would reveal elastic backlash in that design, the backlash that
    >> unscrews retaining bolts and mashes the pressure faces (that are
    >> too small in the first place).


    > Do you have reason to believe that Shimano (or others) are actually
    > simulating this interface? Presumably they design it with a CAD
    > tool but do they do the analysis? It seems the sort of thing that
    > requires the engineer to know what to look for; but if they did,
    > they probably wouldn't have made the mistake in the first place.


    Of course not, but I say they have the opportunity to do that and
    don't necessarily need engineers who recognize mechanical problems
    with such assemblies. I think it would be good for these people to
    study what was done at the dawn of bicycling because at that time the
    best engineers around were working on that and many of the "inventions
    we see today" are re-inventions of things done then. For instance
    Rolf wheels, aka Lovelace patent 1890.

    Shimano crank attachment was also there in Cook Bros. BMX equipment.

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  17. Gary Young

    Gary Young Guest

    [email protected] (Gary Young) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Urban Sherpa) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    > >
    > > I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    > > loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    > > is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt
    > > with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    > > is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    > > me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cost
    > > way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, or
    > > Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
    > >
    > > My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will my
    > > 52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    > > standard/compatible?
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for the info, -Karl

    >
    > When you stand on the pedals, do you do so right foot forward? If so,
    > this may have not been your fault but a design defect that has been
    > diagnosed by Jobst Brandt. Just do a google search for "right foot
    > forward" and you'll come up with many discussions of this. Shimano
    > seems to have acknowledged the problem with the octolink design with
    > its new generation of pinch-bolt cranks.
    >
    > If you do stand right foot forward, then why give hell to Cannondale?



    Correction: I meant to say, Why NOT give hell to Cannondale? As the
    manufacturer, they're responsible for selling you a faulty design and
    arguably should pay for fixing the problem.
     
  18. [email protected] (Urban Sherpa) wrote

    >>>Cannondale RW700 road bike if it matters....
    >>>
    >>>I recently had a problem with my left crank arm. Seems the bolt
    >>>loosened and semi-stripped the octalink splines on the crank arm (BB
    >>>is OK). Now I have to stop every few miles and tighten the crank bolt=


    >>>with my 8mm. (even with a torque wrench the bolt loosens). The crank
    >>>is a Cannondale EX, and the Cannondale factory or dealers won't sell
    >>>me a single left arm. The tech guy said I'd have to buy the set (cos=

    t
    >>>way more than I should have to spend). I've decided to buy a 105, o=

    r
    >>>Ultegra instead of the C'dale.
    >>>
    >>>My question.... if I buy JUST the crank arms (w/o chainrings) will m=

    y
    >>>52/42/30 chainrings fit the Shimano stuff, are they
    >>>standard/compatible?


    Yes. All 130/74 cranks/chainrings are intercompatible.

    If it's just the left side that's wrecked, why not just buy a left=20
    crank? That's the cheap one.

    See: http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=3D49&Category=3D2688

    Tom Sherman wrote:

    >>'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (o=

    r=20
    >>several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).

    >=20

    Michael Klein replied:
    >=20
    > I thought that the name of the part is "crank arm" and that crank was
    > a short name (and also a verb describing the action).=20


    Nope, Tom's right, but you're not the first to make this error, and=20
    probably won't be the last.

    > Giant's website
    > contains the following line where they use the term crank arm: "The
    > URT design is an ingenious suspension system whereby the drivetrain of
    > the bicycle (gears, chain, derailleurs, bottom bracket, crank arms,
    > rear wheel) are all contained within the swingarm structure."


    I must admit that I got a chuckle out of the idea of using Taiwanese=20
    product literature as a reference source for correct English usage!

    Sheldon Don't Get Me Going About Brake 'Arches'" Brown
    London, England 'til tomorrow
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
    | I'll be traveling in France and England throughout the month |
    | of June. I hope to remain online, but don't know what sort |
    | of 'Net access I'll be able to get... |
    | I lost 190 MB of mail due to mailbox overload in mid June, |
    | so if you wrote me and din=92t get a reply, try again. |
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  19. On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 22:35:08 -0500, Tom Sherman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael J. Klein wrote:
    >
    >> ...
    >>>'Crank arm" is redundant. "Crank" is sufficient to describe the part (or
    >>>several rec.bicycles.tech regulars for that matter).

    >>
    >>
    >> I thought that the name of the part is "crank arm" and that crank was
    >> a short name (and also a verb describing the action). Giant's website
    >> contains the following line where they use the term crank arm: "The
    >> URT design is an ingenious suspension system whereby the drivetrain of
    >> the bicycle (gears, chain, derailleurs, bottom bracket, crank arms,
    >> rear wheel) are all contained within the swingarm structure."

    >
    >See the following links for some crankiness (pun intended) on the subject.
    ><http://groups.google.com/groups?q=crank+arm+jobst+brandt&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&c2coff=1&safe=off&selm=cwjx7.4238%24no1.47989%40typhoon.sonic.net&rnum=1>
    ><http://groups.google.com/groups?q=crank+arm+jobst+brandt&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&c2coff=1&safe=off&selm=LdQ3b.16601%24dk4.543192%40typhoon.sonic.net&rnum=3>


    I wish I had that much time.... lol

    Does this mean that the drafters who specify part names and use "Arm,
    Crank, [model number]" are wrong?
    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  20. On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 15:47:46 +0100, Sheldon Brown
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    <snipped out stuff>

    >I must admit that I got a chuckle out of the idea of using Taiwanese
    >product literature as a reference source for correct English usage!


    They have a coffee product here called "Mr. Brown's" too!

    At least Giant is smart enough to use native English speakers to write
    the English text. Nearly every use of English here in Taiwan is
    incorrect and some of them are incredible.

    http://www.icoffeestore.com/m/Mr_Brown_Coffees/

    Michael J. Klein [email protected]
    Dasi Jen, Taoyuan Hsien, Taiwan, ROC
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
    ---------------------------------------------
     
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