Chains, cogs and wear

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tim Woodall, Apr 1, 2003.

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  1. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    Over the winter my chain has worn to the point that it urgently needs replacing. (More than 1/16"
    wear, less than 1/8" wear AFAICT)

    However, I, perhaps foolishly, "converted" my bike to a single speed during the winter by not
    changing gear. (I did occasionally change gear, e.g. when making trips to the supermarket when
    loaded and I obviously didn't always return to exactly the same gear)

    So, the 17 tooth sprocket has visibly hooked teeth and the 16 tooth sprocket is visibly worn while
    the rest look ok.

    I suspect that if I change the chain I'm not going to be able to use these two cogs without the
    chain jumping.

    So, should I keep going with this chain and cassette until they finally break or start skipping or
    should I replace both now?

    The chainrings are fairly new, presumably if I keep going I will ruin them as well? And what about
    the jockey wheels?

    I suppose in future I should change the chain earlier. This is the first winter I have ridden the
    bike every day and I had no idea how much damage the salt would do (I had to dismantle the cassette
    to clean out all the salt crystals that had formed).

    Re-reading S-Bs page about chains again (amazing how you can keep finding new things in those pages)
    I have discovered that I have been oiling the chain on the wrong side as well which would also help
    explain why the chain has gone from "immeasurable" stretch to badly worn in only about 700 miles.
    The water, salt and grit of winter has had a field day. I've very recently changed to Finish Line
    Krytech wax lube which I hope might help next winter but it's too late for this winter.

    Finally, how often to people oil their chains in the winter? Every day, once a week, if it rains or
    (as I have been doing) once per fortnight? And do people clean the chains between each oiling? The
    big problem with winter is that it is dark almost all the time so jobs like these have to "fit in"
    to the daylight hours :-(

    Regards,

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Tim Woodall wrote:
    > Over the winter my chain has worn to the point that it urgently needs replacing. (More than 1/16"
    > wear, less than 1/8" wear AFAICT)
    >
    > However, I, perhaps foolishly, "converted" my bike to a single speed during the winter by not
    > changing gear. (I did occasionally change gear, e.g. when making trips to the supermarket when
    > loaded and I obviously didn't always return to exactly the same gear)
    >
    > So, the 17 tooth sprocket has visibly hooked teeth and the 16 tooth sprocket is visibly worn while
    > the rest look ok.
    >
    > I suspect that if I change the chain I'm not going to be able to use these two cogs without the
    > chain jumping.

    Can't be sure until you try.

    > So, should I keep going with this chain and cassette until they finally break or start skipping or
    > should I replace both now?
    >
    > The chainrings are fairly new, presumably if I keep going I will ruin them as well?

    That's right. You have to whether it's more worthile to carry on with what you've got and wear the
    rings out (it all might last a long time and work fine until something eventually skips, but rings
    will be expensive to replace) or fit a new chain (and sprockets if nec).

    Unless you are considering/prepared to replace chainrings (or bike!) soonish anyway, I suggest
    fitting a new chain asap, try it, if skips, fit a new cassette/freewheel or perhaps new sprocket(s)
    if you can get them.

    > And what about the jockey wheels?

    They will wear but don't worry about those so much. Very worn jockeys still work and aren't very
    expensive to replace anyway.

    > Finally, how often to people oil their chains in the winter? Every day, once a week, if it rains
    > or (as I have been doing) once per fortnight?

    Depends on the lube, but chain definitely needs more attention after use in the wet. Don't worry
    about it if chain has no stiff links and does not squeak.

    > And do people clean the chains between each oiling?

    I try to.

    ~PB
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Tim Woodall wrote:
    > > Over the winter my chain has worn to the point that it urgently needs replacing. (More than
    > > 1/16" wear, less than 1/8" wear AFAICT)

    > > So, should I keep going with this chain and cassette until they finally break or start skipping
    > > or should I replace both now?
    > >
    > > The chainrings are fairly new, presumably if I keep going I will ruin them as well?

    > Unless you are considering/prepared to replace chainrings (or bike!) soonish anyway, I suggest
    > fitting a new chain asap, try it, if skips, fit a new cassette/freewheel or perhaps new
    > sprocket(s) if you can get them.

    Just to confuse Tim I would suggest carrying on with the current chain until the stretch has got to
    1/8" as the cassette is already visibly worn, then change the chain and cassette together. As long
    as the chainring is not looking shark-toothy it will probably survive.

    > > And do people clean the chains between each oiling?
    >
    > I try to.

    Yes. I hold a rag round the bottom stretch and run the chain through it by turning the pedals
    backwards a few times. If the chain is reasonably clean I'll then add a drop of oil to each link
    straight away, only wiping the surplus off immediately before the next ride. I've tried various
    waxes but I still think oil is best even though both the chain and the bike get dirtier.

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. Al_mossah

    Al_mossah Guest

    Last year I had a problem with my chain coming apart. One link came away from its stud.. When I put
    the stud back in, it kept coming out.

    As the chain had done about 5,000 miles, I replaced it, but tried to get away with not changing the
    rear sprocket. The new chain skipped like mad, and was basically unusable. So I got a new rear
    sprocket and all was fine. I haven't had to change the front set (of 3).

    I've done another 1,000 miles, and all is well.

    Peter.

    "Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Tim Woodall wrote:
    > > > Over the winter my chain has worn to the point that it urgently needs replacing. (More than
    > > > 1/16" wear, less than 1/8" wear AFAICT)
    >
    > > > So, should I keep going with this chain and cassette until they finally break or start
    > > > skipping or should I replace both now?
    > > >
    > > > The chainrings are fairly new, presumably if I keep going I will ruin them as well?
    >
    > > Unless you are considering/prepared to replace chainrings (or bike!) soonish anyway, I suggest
    > > fitting a new chain asap, try it, if skips,
    fit
    > > a new cassette/freewheel or perhaps new sprocket(s) if you can get them.
    >
    > Just to confuse Tim I would suggest carrying on with the current chain until the stretch has got
    > to 1/8" as the cassette is already visibly worn, then change the chain and cassette together. As
    > long as the chainring is not looking shark-toothy it will probably survive.
    >
    > > > And do people clean the chains between each oiling?
    > >
    > > I try to.
    >
    > Yes. I hold a rag round the bottom stretch and run the chain through it by turning the pedals
    > backwards a few times. If the chain is reasonably clean I'll then add a drop of oil to each link
    > straight away, only wiping the surplus off immediately before the next ride. I've tried various
    > waxes but I still think oil is best even though both the chain and the bike get dirtier.
    >
    > --
    > Dave...
     
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