Changing an MTB into a road machine.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by F.G., Apr 24, 2006.

  1. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    I've got a high geared, slick tyred MTB, which i've been using to courier and/or commute. I want to replace the cheap wheelset on it and the tyres, having read a few threads on this topic i'm more confused about what i shoud be looking for. I anticipated trying to build my own wheelset, (something i've never done before but am eager to try my hand at), and putting specialized all condition pro 26x1" on them. Although I've heard 650c fit on Mtbs and may be a better choice? And if so 650c's require different tyres. I would be very greatfull for any advice on this topic! and if any one has been using these tyres, some feedback on those would be great too.

    Many Thanks!
    F.G.
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    See the bike down the bottom? Yes the ladies one, I sometimes use 650c wheels on that, Velocity Deep-V wheels with Conti Ultra Gator Skins in 650x23c. :D

    They make Conti Ultra Gator Skins in 26" X 28mm now!! :eek: Just for 26" MTB wheels.

    If you go the 650c way, the rear will need a Deore (135mm) hub. Just specify which hub you want when ordering :)

    See also the MTB-Slicks topic: http://www.cyclingforums.com/t291662.html
     
  3. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    Thanks for the info , George. I assume the 135mm deore rear hub is to accomodate the wider dropouts of an mtb. although I have heard good things about the conti gatorskins, if i go for the 26" wheels i'll probably go for the all condition tyres, just because 1" is a bit thinner than 28mm so I asume it should go faster, also I think they go up to 125psi! out of interest did you find the 650c's lighter/faster/better than conventional 26" in short would you recomend them?
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Ok on the 26"x1 however I'm not a Specialised fan, just check the recomended inflation pressures for both, the Conti at 28mm just may be higher and have a lower rolling reistance. Have a read of that Slicks topic.

    As for speed, 650c=48 minutes which is 2-7 minutes faster over my home-pool commute of 50-55 minutes on the 700c Felt. If you were in Perth I would lend them to you to have a try.


    650C: 130mm rear axle drop out and 571mm BSD rim.
    26": 135mm rear axle drop out and 559 BSD rim.
    Front wheels, both 650c and 26" use 100mm axle drop outs.
    If you need a "hybrid" rear wheel, just tell them.
     
  5. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    I had a read of that thread, some good info, increasingly obscured by some extreemly spurious and questionable posts by danielhaden, I was previously unaware that I guaged my speed by what what gear I'm in, instead of reading my computer. i've currently got a 1.5" speciallized nimbus on the front, which has been ok considering its's trashed now. And 1.25" michelin on the rear (I realise that they should be the other way round) which I do prefer, although I think its only the width.

    So your 650c's outpaced your 700c bike that really surprised me! So for pace they must outdo light-ish mtb 26"ers. And I think the 125 psi is the max written on the tyre.

    thanks for the hub info thats what i though it would be about.

    p.s. I would greatfully try them out if I was in perth, but I'm in Leeds, in the UK unfortunately!
     
  6. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Yes, its a pity the slicks topic got polluted by dh.

    I was keeping this until later, my fastest time to the pool was 42 minutes, however for over half of the distance I was drafting road bikes. The setup, Merida Kalahari MTB, Rigid CrMo forks, 11-30 8 speed, 48t big ring, and 26x1.3 Conti Sport Contact tyres @ 100psi! It was awesome. :cool:

    Have a look at the new Michelin slicks, they should be available in the UK. On a smoothe flat road or in a triathlon I would prefer the 650c wheels, however, in a typical suburban or cross town situation, the 26" MTB wheel and Sport Contact combination was more suitable.
     
  7. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    I had a look for the michelin slicks you mentioned, but couldn't find them anywhere, not even on michelin's own website. Do you have a more specific name for them? I don't know how far your pool is, but that sounds like quite some speed in comparison to your other two. My bike has 42t and 52t chainrings at the front and 11-28 7 speed on the back, and with spd's and a high saddle position you can really get up some speed with it. the 7 speed is something else which concerned me, most hubs seem to be 8/9 speed, do you know if this is a problem?

    It sounds like I should/will probably go for trying to build a pair of 26"ers (considering the pot-holes and kerbs come hard and fast in leeds) although I did see a pair of 650 rims on ebay going for $42 from a bike shop, which seemed suspiciouly cheap. 390g, 28 hole perhaps they're just not great for time-trials/triathlon suff?
    yrs, F.G.
     
  8. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    From: http://two-wheels.michelin.com/2w/f...codePage=2092004115810_28022005183349&lang=EN
    XCR Road : 26x1,40 / 66 TPI / gray+black / FB

    On the 7 speed, is the rear hub a cassette type or a spin on freewheel type? With both types in 7s, they are impossible to upgrade to 8 or 9 speed without changing the hub. The new hub should be a Shimano 8/9 speed freehub type 135mm with an 8 speed 12-25 as a good cassettte choice. I find the 7 speed shifters work OK on the high 7 (11-28) of an 8 speed (11-32) cassette (650c wheel).

    I don't think the 650c rim choice gives enough tyre size options, you are locked into 23mm.

    I was discussing this with the GF last night, the merits of two wheelsets, 26x1.5 65psi city tyres on one and 650cx23mm road tyres on the other. She decided a few months back to have two bikes, one is a Felt F-100 road bike with 650cX23mm tyres the other an Apollo Panther MTB with 24"x1.75 city tyres. Previously she had a Ladies MTB with Maxxis Detonator 26x1.25 slicks, both the new bikes do their intened jobs better.

    I guess the bottom line is, one bike with 26" rims with slicks in the 1" to 1.4" range, or two bikes (or two wheelsets) with similar options to what she chose, road tyres on the 650s, and 1.5 city tyres on the MTB rims.
     
  9. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    Thanks for the link. I had a look at those tyres, they certainly look fast and slick, even if they are 1.4. The thing about the cassette is that its not a freewheel cassette because an 11t is apparently too small to fit that way, I remember when I bought the bike (I had it built out of a collection new and 2nd hand bits) it needed a freehub on the back. The actual gears I'm very happy with, and the 7 speed is fine, the question is how easy it is to find a freehub to accommodate my current cassette.

    I like the two wheelset theory and think that that is where i'm going to aim sometime in the future. But in my current economic restraints I can only stretch as far as one set, so i'm going to try and get some decent mtb wheels for now, with as super thin slicks as i can, and then at a later date (with more money!)look into some 650c's. then I can look into getting some thicker 26" slicks, and like your friend I'll be all sorted.

    Out of interest have you got any advice on wheel building?
    yrs, F.G.

    p.s. my local bike shop owner told me the other day that you can apparently put 700c wheels on an mtb, the V-brakes don't work, so youhave to have disks, and there's next to no clearance, but appearently it's enough (rear hubs might be a problem too)!
     
  10. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Firstly, hub and cassette options, I see you have a 7 speed Freehub Cassette type wheel at the moment. Yes the freehub body is too narrow for an 8 speed cassette. You will be limited to the current CS-HG-30-I 11-28 7 speed Cassette.

    (For readers with the older Spin-on Freewheels, use Shimano MF-HG-50 11-28 for similar performance results)

    However, If building a new wheel, go for an 8 speed freehub and cassette. There are lots of these cheap MTB wheels around. Here in Aus we have the Velocity Factory so I leave it up to them. The 7 speed shifter you have will shift 7 of the 8 ok, I do that with my 650c wheel in the MTB.

    I would not try to fit 700c into a mtb, buy a flat bar road bike, Giant FCR or similar. I know some do with disc brake hubs. $$$ :rolleyes:

    My top 3 choices on MTB Slick tyres would go like this:
    1. Conti Ulta Gator Skin Slicks in 26"X28mm
    2. Conti Sport Contact in 26"X1.3
    3. Michelin XCR Road : 26x1.40
    After that, the usual run of Maxxis, Specialiazed, etx, too numerous to catalogue.

    As for 23mm 650c, I use Conti GP4000s on the race wheels and Conti Ultra Gator Skins on the training wheels. The rear MTB/650 wheel has an old 23mm Conti GP on it. The Felt Road Bike has Conti GP4000 in light Blue. :cool:
     
  11. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    So you think I should go for an eight speed freehub/cassette, if building a new wheel, and just use 7 of them. I was anticipating re-using my current cassette, but I don't know if I can Just stick a 30t ring next to the 28, and make it eightspeed? isn't the indexing different for eightspeed, i mean do you need a different width chain? I guess if so I'll need a new cassette too.

    By the way when you say cheap mtb wheels do you mean good-cheap, or bad-cheap? (i'm guessing bad).

    I'd be interested to know what your choice of rims/hubs would be if you were me? (i'm assuming the deore hub you mentioned earlier are the quite cheap (but good quality) shimano ones). Thanks.
    yrs, F.G.
     
  12. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    As I am in Aus, it is difficult to make suggestions from what is available in the UK. High end Tyres and Shimano parts are the same the world over, but some local markets have their bargains. Here Velocity is in that category, they build wheels with very strong rims and cheap or expensive hubs, whatever you prefer, a cheap rear wheel for $75-100 or a expensive one for $300-400. There are Chinese wheels here for as low as $50-65.

    If this is a serious project, invest in good components, Shimano Deore hub, HG50 8 speed 12-25 cassette, a quality MTB rim. Or a complete wheel with a serviceable hub, one where you can buy the cones and balls and get it apart easily.

    MTB shifters, I assume you are using EF29 or similar, 7/8 speed Shimano cranksets and chains are interchangeable, anyway 8 speed EF29 shifters are real cheap. The 3/4 tooth gaps on a 7 speed cassette will be a pain with a faster bike, you need closer ratios of a 8 speed 12-25 road cassette.

    My GF has done this to two of her bikes, I'll get her to write to you, she comes from the UK and has a relative who had a bike shop there.
     
  13. Little Jackie

    Little Jackie New Member

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    George asked me to reply to your post, but I feel he has really given you as much information as he can.

    Decide exactly what you are looking to do with your bike (upgrades). Look through George's relevant suggestions one change at a time to ascertain what you have to buy. Write it all down and take it to a bike shop that someone else you know finds reliable in doing serious work. My guess would be a bike shop that sells higher end bikes if you can't find one through word of mouth. Ask on the forum about your local area!

    I used George's suggestions to upgrade the gearing on my mountain bike, by taking the details to my local bike shop (as well as other modifications).
     
  14. F.G.

    F.G. New Member

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    Thanks for your reply, I think I'm going to go for lightweight mtb rims and shimano hubs, and an eightspeed cassette (get some 650c's aswell when i'm a bit richer).

    George, I saw your pedals on another thread, they look nice. My single sided pedals, which I was talking about were an emergency buy in france last summer (I went touring and unpacked my bike to find I'd forgotten my pedals!), so I got the cheapest spd's I could, which were some unknown brand and not weighted at all properly.

    thanks for all the help.

    F.G.
     
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