Changing cassette and chain

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jjiam1234, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. jjiam1234

    jjiam1234 New Member

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    Hey this is a question, I finally purchased the new Ultegra cassette and chain for the season. Should I buy the tools to do it myself or should i take it to the LBS. I mean it's hard to explain to them, hey I bought it off of Ebay cause prices are much cheaper, but if it's too hard then I can. I watched a video on it, but what if something goes wrong, I wouldnt know how to fix it. If i do install them, I have no idea of how much grease i should put on the chain or if I should lube the cassette. So any input is appreciative.
     
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  2. wheelist

    wheelist New Member

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    It's probably going to cost you as much to buy the tools as it is to take it to the shop, so if you're looking at doing this as a one-time job, never to be repeated then take it to the LBS.

    But if you're gonna do this again at some point, then why not invest in the tools and save yourself some money in the long run.

    If something goes wrong, then you can take it to the LBS!

    Of course, the likelihood is that you'll enjoy it, decide to do something else yourself, end up buying loads more tools and be capable of fixing everything on your bike - not a bad outcome is it?
     
  3. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    A bike shop that understands the 'market' won't get sweated up about you getting a part on ebay and wanting them to put it on. Not like taking a waterpump into a car fixit place. BUT be prepared to pay for their time. $10-$15 is fair. A smart bike shop will do a good job, charge a fair price and hopefully you will be impressed to the point of seeing them again. Service/labor $ is the highest margin 'thing' in a bike shop. Pay for their expertise and you won't be disappointed. If they just get surly, go elsewhere.
     
  4. Phill P

    Phill P New Member

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    Get the tools.

    Changing a cassette is a piece of cake. Takes a minute or two to stack all the gears onto the spline but it really is easy.

    If you get a chain with a quick link it is easy too. Assuming you are using the same gear ratios all you have to do is make the chain the same length by punching out a few pins. Depending on your riding conditions you should be changing the chain before it is worn (2000-3000) to get best life from the cassette so it is a good skill to learn.

    You don't lube the cassette, not even the splines on the hub. You should learn how and when to clean/lube a chain. Waiting to hear a squeek is not good enough!!

    If you learn how to look after your bike it will last longer. Many of these tasks are weekly or monthly depending on your riding conditions. Taking of your bike will make your rides more enjoyable, quieter, and you bike will last longer and you will save money!
     
  5. rparedes

    rparedes New Member

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    I would not do it unless you want or are interested in doing your bike work in the future. If you are, then I would invest in a good book (Zinn and the art of road bike maintenance) then buy the tools. Changing the chain is very easy. The cassette is just a little harder since you may encounter a few problems like: cassette too tight and can't get off or you need an extra spacer. But if you're replacing a similar brand cassette and you are not changing wheels, it should not be a problem. Look at the videos on YouTube, they help.
    You will find that it is fun to work on and learn more about your bike.
     
  6. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    The Park Tools website has an extensive on line repair manual:

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/

    Working on your own bike is lots of fun in my opinion, and makes you much more able to perform routine inspections and judge when something is going wrong. It might just save your life!
     
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