Changing chain rings

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by news news, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. news news

    news news Guest

    I would like to change my chain rings to a larger size. Currently, I have
    48t, 36t, 26t triple set. I would like to change them to 53t, 43, 36
    approximately. I'm looking for higher gears. This bicycle is a Cannondale
    tandem, and my stoker and I often run out of gears on the high end.

    what is the suggested number of chain links to add based upon the upgrade?

    TIA

    JONS
     
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  2. news news wrote:
    > I would like to change my chain rings to a larger size. Currently, I have
    > 48t, 36t, 26t triple set. I would like to change them to 53t, 43, 36
    > approximately. I'm looking for higher gears. This bicycle is a Cannondale
    > tandem, and my stoker and I often run out of gears on the high end.
    >
    > what is the suggested number of chain links to add based upon the upgrade?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > JONS


    Chains are real cheap. Why take chances adding new links to an old
    chain. Chances being you do not get the little pins pushed in exactly
    perfectly and cause a failure at the connection and the new chain/old
    chain will cause skipping on the old cassette you are using. Nashbar
    is selling a 9 speed recumbent chain (232 links) for $15. The 8 speed
    version is even cheaper. That is two chains, $7.50 each. Cheap.

    As for how long to make the new chain, just put it on the new big
    chainring and around the biggest cassette cog, through the derailleur,
    and pull the chain as tight as possible so the rear derailleur is about
    as straight towards the crankset as possible. About that long or a
    link longer.
     
  3. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    news news wrote:
    > I would like to change my chain rings to a larger size. Currently, I have
    > 48t, 36t, 26t triple set. I would like to change them to 53t, 43, 36
    > approximately. I'm looking for higher gears. This bicycle is a Cannondale
    > tandem, and my stoker and I often run out of gears on the high end.
    >
    > what is the suggested number of chain links to add based upon the upgrade?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > JONS


    one thing about this is that since chainrings are pricey, you should
    probably just replace the chain as well unless it's pretty close to
    new. a worn chain will (somewhat) quickly wear rings and cogs down to
    its own state of wear. unfortunately, the same argument can be made for
    replacing the cassette if it's worn very much, as worn cassettes also
    wear down new chains somewhat quickly, which in turn will start wearing
    the rings. kind of a mess, huh? if the bike gets ridden a lot, then all
    this will have a chance to come into play, however.

    something i'm not sure about is how well it's going to work to have a
    110/74 crank sporting a 53 on a tandem. 110s with larger rings can be
    pretty flexy on some singles i've met.
     
  4. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 25 Feb 2006 11:36:47 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >As for how long to make the new chain, just put it on the new big
    >chainring and around the biggest cassette cog, through the derailleur,
    >and pull the chain as tight as possible so the rear derailleur is about
    >as straight towards the crankset as possible. About that long or a
    >link longer.


    Not "about that long", but a full link longer. Remember that the chain
    needs enough slack to climb over the teeth of the largest cog or ring
    without damaging the rear derailleur. See:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  5. John Everett wrote:
    > On 25 Feb 2006 11:36:47 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >As for how long to make the new chain, just put it on the new big
    > >chainring and around the biggest cassette cog, through the derailleur,
    > >and pull the chain as tight as possible so the rear derailleur is about
    > >as straight towards the crankset as possible. About that long or a
    > >link longer.

    >
    > Not "about that long", but a full link longer.


    No. You did not read what I wrote. If you actually thread the chain
    through the derailleurs and around the chainrings and pull it together,
    you will have the actual length. Period. If you add 1 full link extra
    as you suggest, you will be too long.

    Remember that the chain
    > needs enough slack to climb over the teeth of the largest cog or ring
    > without damaging the rear derailleur. See:
    >
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain


    Don't follow Mr. Brown's suggestions. I have never understood why
    someone would recommend determining chain length by proxy instead of
    just putting the chain through the rear derailleur and around both
    rings and determining it directly. Maybe in a bike shop saving a
    minute is important. I like how Mr. Brown ends his paragraph with "In
    almost all cases, this will give the optimum length." Almost all
    cases? Why not just thread the chain on as it will be used on the bike
    and determine it correctly in all cases?



    >
    >
    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  6. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 27 Feb 2006 15:45:11 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >John Everett wrote:
    >> On 25 Feb 2006 11:36:47 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> >As for how long to make the new chain, just put it on the new big
    >> >chainring and around the biggest cassette cog, through the derailleur,
    >> >and pull the chain as tight as possible so the rear derailleur is about
    >> >as straight towards the crankset as possible. About that long or a
    >> >link longer.

    >>
    >> Not "about that long", but a full link longer.

    >
    >No. You did not read what I wrote. If you actually thread the chain
    >through the derailleurs and around the chainrings and pull it together,
    >you will have the actual length. Period. If you add 1 full link extra
    >as you suggest, you will be too long.


    Actually I did read what you wrote. I'm sure there are cases where
    doing it your way could result in a chain that's just long enough to
    be connected but will damage the rear derailleur as the chain climbs
    over the teeth on the first shift onto the large/large combination.


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  7. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Dans le message de news:[email protected],
    John Everett <[email protected]> a réfléchi, et puis a
    déclaré :
    > On 27 Feb 2006 15:45:11 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> John Everett wrote:
    >>> On 25 Feb 2006 11:36:47 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> As for how long to make the new chain, just put it on the new big
    >>>> chainring and around the biggest cassette cog, through the
    >>>> derailleur, and pull the chain as tight as possible so the rear
    >>>> derailleur is about as straight towards the crankset as possible.
    >>>> About that long or a link longer.
    >>>
    >>> Not "about that long", but a full link longer.

    >>
    >> No. You did not read what I wrote. If you actually thread the chain
    >> through the derailleurs and around the chainrings and pull it
    >> together, you will have the actual length. Period. If you add 1
    >> full link extra as you suggest, you will be too long.

    >
    > Actually I did read what you wrote. I'm sure there are cases where
    > doing it your way could result in a chain that's just long enough to
    > be connected but will damage the rear derailleur as the chain climbs
    > over the teeth on the first shift onto the large/large combination.
    >

    You have but a single chainring ?
    --
    Bonne route !

    Sandy
    Verneuil-sur-Seine FR
     
  8. news news wrote:
    > I would like to change my chain rings to a larger size. Currently, I have
    > 48t, 36t, 26t triple set. I would like to change them to 53t, 43, 36
    > approximately. I'm looking for higher gears. This bicycle is a Cannondale
    > tandem, and my stoker and I often run out of gears on the high end.
    >
    > what is the suggested number of chain links to add based upon the upgrade?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > JONS


    GO TO A BIKE shop that deals with TA rings-
    Probably one to 2 links to add.
     
  9. SYJ

    SYJ Guest

    Nate Knutson wrote:
    ---snip---
    > something i'm not sure about is how well it's going to work to have a
    > 110/74 crank sporting a 53 on a tandem. 110s with larger rings can be
    > pretty flexy on some singles i've met.

    ---/snip---

    I imagine this depends upon the rings. Ritchey's old, yet highly
    regarded, road logics used this setup for a good long while (prior to
    the current design).

    SYJ
     
  10. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 28 Feb 2006 16:46:10 -0800, "SYJ" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I imagine this depends upon the rings. Ritchey's old, yet highly
    >regarded, road logics used this setup for a good long while (prior to
    >the current design).


    Specialized tandem cranksets were 110 x 74 bolt pattern and used
    54/44/32 rings. The cranks, like the Ritcheys, were made by Sugino.
     
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