Changing front suspension forks to rigid forks

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by dannyfrankszzz, May 26, 2004.

  1. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    I've currently got a pair of front suspension forks on my Marin Muirwoods bike. I've got the suspension turned off as much as possible i.e. with max stiffness but there is still a great deal of give in it.

    I'm thinking about changing to a pair of rigid forks.

    Will this make the bike quicker?

    Will I get a noticeable stiffness in the arms and shoulders as a result?

    What if I get carbon forks?

    My left elbow has a tendency to get stiff - perhaps I should keep to a front suspension.
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dannyfrankszzz wrote:
    > I've currently got a pair of front suspension forks on my
    > Marin Muirwoods bike. I've got the suspension turned off
    > as much as possible
    > i.e. with max stiffness but there is still a great deal of
    > give in it.
    >
    > I'm thinking about changing to a pair of rigid forks.
    >
    > Will this make the bike quicker?

    Depends where you're riding it. On roads, very probably

    > Will I get a noticeable stiffness in the arms and
    > shoulders as a result?

    Depends where you're riding it. Rough stuff, very probably.

    > My left elbow has a tendency to get stiff - perhaps I
    > should keep to a front suspension.

    Depends what sort of riding you're doing.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
    33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
    Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    Most of the roads I go on are tarmaced and flat. I don't do any offroad stuff.

    So in your opinion, it's worth changing over?

    Would carbon forks be a good compromise between the two although probably a little pricier.
     
  4. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

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    Quite interesting. It sounds as though you are converting your bike into a hybrid like the Marin Point Reyes.

    If you are going to get a set of rigid carbon forks (e.g. PACE) then presumably you will be getting a set of slick tyres as well?

    The resulting frame will be a lot more responsive because less of the power that you put through the pedals will be dissipated by fork compression.

    I doubt that you'll notice any marked increase in arm / shoulder stiffness if you are going to be riding mainly on roads, because of the "sit up and beg" posture that mountain bikes typically require - this tends to alleviate weight being put on the arms and shoulders, unlike road bikes where you are in a "tuck" position.

    Let us know what you decide ;)
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    dannyfrankszzz <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Most of the roads I go on are tarmaced and flat. I don't
    : do any offroad stuff.

    : So in your opinion, it's worth changing over?

    Ah. In that case rigid is the way to go.

    : Would carbon forks be a good compromise between the two
    : although probably a little pricier.

    Carbon forks aren't a compromise between rigid and sus. They
    are rigid forks. Full stop. They may ride a bit smoother
    than a cheap Al rigid fork, but they are in no way
    comparable (for good or bad) to a suspension fork.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a
    philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dannyfrankszzz wrote:
    > Most of the roads I go on are tarmaced and flat. I don't
    > do any offroad stuff.
    >=20
    > So in your opinion, it's worth changing over?
    >=20
    > Would carbon forks be a good compromise between the two
    > although probably a little pricier.

    Wot Arthur said. Plus if you want to go faster then you may
    wish to=20 assess different handlebars as well as a fork
    change (though you may=20 need to change your gear shifters
    and brake levers too...). Drops=20 and/or aero bars should
    allow you less air resistance in a tuck, and=20 that's what
    will affect your speed most as you get progressively faster.

    If you want just a wafffeeeeere of suspension effect then
    something like =

    a Pantour suspension hub may well be worth looking at. These
    give you=20 12 mm of travel and are there for road type
    continuous bump-ettes, not=20 absorbing Big Air. I've not
    tried one though I've heard good words=20 said. But they
    ain't cheap at =A3135 each :-( (see=20
    http://kinetics.org.uk/html/pantour_hubs.shtml)

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382
    660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44
    1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
    [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Vic .

    Vic . Guest

    On Wed, 26 May 2004 11:35:02 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I don't think so. Not much anyway. If you're getting much
    >bounce in your suspension on flat roads as you pedal you're
    >probably mashing - using your legs as pistons - rather than
    >spinning (using lower gears and moving your feet in
    >circles). Learn to spin, it's more efficient.

    Spinning is "More efficient". That's a big bold claim: Care
    to back it up somehow?

    Cheers,

    Vic.
     
  8. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    Mmm, interesting reading. Seems a little gimmicky the Pantour suspension thing.

    I'm beginning to lean more towards a rigid fork.

    Any recommendations?

    Cheers.
     
  9. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Vic. [email protected] opined the
    following...
    > >I don't think so. Not much anyway. If you're getting much
    > >bounce in your suspension on flat roads as you pedal
    > >you're probably mashing - using your legs as pistons -
    > >rather than spinning (using lower gears and moving your
    > >feet in circles). Learn to spin, it's more efficient.
    >
    > Spinning is "More efficient". That's a big bold claim:
    > Care to back it up somehow?

    Basic principle follows:

    High gear, low cadence: Force applied vertically (Up and
    down movement). Dead spots at top and bottom of crank
    motion. Equivalent to low leverage (Large force over a small
    distance). Bad for your knees.

    Low gear, high cadence: Force now applied in a more circular
    manner. Dead spots at top and bottom of crank motion
    significantly reduced. Equivalent to high leverage (Small
    force over a large distance). This makes it easier to pedal
    in circles rather than up and down. Much much better for
    your knees.

    There is a point at which you are no longer able to apply a
    useful force to the pedals when spinning. With training, you
    can make this point faster, but an optimum will usually lie
    a little slower than this point. Be kind to your knees.

    Jon
     
  10. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    dannyfrankszzz wrote:
    > Mmm, interesting reading. Seems a little gimmicky the
    > Pantour suspension thing.
    >
    > I'm beginning to lean more towards a rigid fork.
    >
    > Any recommendations?

    How much do you want to spend?
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Vic. wrote:

    > Spinning is "More efficient". That's a big bold claim:
    > Care to back it up somehow?

    Notice you you get a pogo effect minimised. Though pogoing
    is mainly a problem with suspension bikes, you've got some
    suspension through your tyres in any case and the suspension
    merely illustrates you're creating waste energy jumping the
    bike up and down better than your tyres do.

    Or watch a pro spinning up a /long/ climb rather than
    mashing it.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
    33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
    Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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  13. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

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    I was wondering if there were any forks available made of carbon for a MTB size bike.
     
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