Changing gear cassette and derailer on trek 2200

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Johncontrane, May 6, 2004.

  1. Johncontrane

    Johncontrane Guest

    I have a 1992 Trek 2200 with two chain rings on the front.
    My lowest gear is the in the back is 25 teeth.

    It looks like I can put a 9 gear cassete 11 -32 teeth on the
    bike and change the derailer and chain so I can climb hills
    easier. My questions are:

    1) This will require a mountain bike derailer with a long
    arm. Will this set up be slower and less accurate than my
    present setup which works smooth and quickly.

    2)It looks like there at least 3 choices of Shimano
    components:
    a)Deore derailer $22, slightly better M510 $27,
    cassette OEM $15
    b)LX derailer $34 cassette $35
    c)XT derailer $75, Cassette $49

    Clearly the more expensive equipment is 30 to 50 grams
    lighter. Does this make much difference?

    What other advantages or differences does the more
    expensive equipment have?

    3) Are the any major DISADVANTAGES to this set up?

    Thanks
     
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  2. johncontrane wrote:

    > I have a 1992 Trek 2200 with two chain rings on the front.
    > My lowest gear is the in the back is 25 teeth.
    >
    > It looks like I can put a 9 gear cassete 11 -32 teeth on
    > the bike and change the derailer and chain so I can climb
    > hills easier. My questions are:
    >
    > 1) This will require a mountain bike derailer with a long
    > arm. Will this set up be slower and less accurate than
    > my present setup which works smooth and quickly.

    Not significantly.

    > 2)It looks like there at least 3 choices of Shimano
    > components:
    > a)Deore derailer $22, slightly better M510 $27,
    > cassette OEM $15
    > b)LX derailer $34 cassette $35
    > C)XT derailer $75, Cassette $49
    >
    > Clearly the more expensive equipment is 30 to 50 grams
    > lighter. Does this make much difference?
    >
    Nope.
    >
    > What other advantages or differences does the more
    > expensive equipment have?

    The derailers are slightly better sealed, and, if you're a
    super high-mileage rider, or ride a lot in sloppy
    conditions, the more expensive models will take longer to
    wear out. However, hardly anybody actually wears out
    derailers.
    >
    > 3) Are the any major DISADVANTAGES to this set up?

    Yes, there will be big gaps between gears. In particular,
    the 17-20 tooth jump is pretty nasty. There will likely be
    lots of times when the 20 is too low and t he 17 is too
    high. The main reason for this is that the cassette you
    mentions wastes one of the 9 gear positions on the useless
    11 tooth sprocket. (It's not useless on a mountain bike with
    a 42 or 44 maximum in front, but presumably you've got a full-
    sized crank, with a 52 or a 53.)

    For this application, I'd recommend one of my custom
    cassettes, either the 13-30 Century Special, or the 13-34
    Cyclotouriste 13. These have more comfortable
    intermediate jumps.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/9

    Sheldon "Gears" Brown +--------------------------------------------------------
    +
    | In the final analysis, our most basic common link, | is
    | that we all inhabit this small planet, | we all breathe
    | the same air, | we all cherish our children's futures, |
    | and we are all mortal. --John F. Kennedy |
    +--------------------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-
    9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find
    parts shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com
    http://sheldonbrown.com
     
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