Changing handlebars regularly?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bb, Aug 9, 2003.

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  1. Bb

    Bb Guest

    I've heard people say that handlebars should be changed at some sort of regular intervals, and given
    some of the stress thats put on them that sort of makes sense. Is this really common practice,
    though? Has anyone had a handlebar break just from normal use (i.e. not during a crash)?

    Cheers, -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
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  2. Clyde_in_tn

    Clyde_in_tn Guest

    BB wrote:
    > I've heard people say that handlebars should be changed at some sort of regular intervals, and
    > given some of the stress thats put on them that sort of makes sense. Is this really common
    > practice, though? Has anyone had a handlebar break just from normal use (i.e. not during a crash)?

    Yes, I saw the aftermath of a bar breakage during the FOMBA Watershed Wahoo last year. I think it
    was Team Chuck's handlebars snapped. Albeit it was an aluminum ar on a Single Speed the results were
    less that pretty. Definitely made me appreciate the stoutness of my Uncle Jesse bars.
     
  3. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | I've heard people say that handlebars should be changed at some sort of regular intervals, and
    | given some of the stress thats put on them that sort of makes sense. Is this really common
    | practice, though? Has anyone had a handlebar break just from normal use (i.e. not during a crash)?

    That depends somewhat on the bar in question. Back in the 90s, when the ultra light (sub 140 grams)
    flat bars started to appear, so did the admonition that you should change them every season (yearly)
    due to catastrophic failure due to metal fatigue. That was also during the age of bar-ends (I still
    use them myself) and of special plugs designed to keep you from crushing those beer can thin bar
    walls with them.

    Since then, the industry has pulled back from the precipice, strengthening bars where they need it
    most. There has also been a large shift to longer, slightly thicker, heavier bars (downhill riser
    style) which are noted by some (not all) as being more comfortable. As a result, you hear the
    warning about changing the bars less often.

    Your best bet is to use common sense. If your bars are crimped, sagging, dimpled, turning funny
    colors, getting stress risers, etc, yank them off and get new ones. Bars are cheap enough that if
    you have any question, you're better off making the change. Some types will last longer than others.
    I've mentioned the heavier downhill type, but there are also the carbon type. I use a Scott Black
    Magic (out of production) flat handlebar on my MTB and it will probably be around until doomsday
    (alloy bar wrapped in carbon fiber - 150 grams, bulletproof) Before that, I had a 140 gram Control
    Tech bar that fractured at 6 months.

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

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