Chaote Squash?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by OmManiPadmeOmelet, Feb 20, 2006.

  1. Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...

    I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)

    What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?

    What are the best soil conditions for planting sweet potatoes?
    They are a member of the morning glory family and have the most
    beautiful blooms. I've never grown them successfully, I think the soil
    was too dense!

    Spring planting is right around the corner! <G>

    I may grow Okra again this year.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 21:03:58 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...


    You mean ChaYote? I hear it goes great with [cough] cojita
    cheese.

    :)

    -sw <ducking>
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >
    > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    >
    > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?


    It's a squash that can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw, it's quite crispy
    and would probably be good with creamy-type dips. You can bake it,
    saute it, or put it in soups. It's quite tasty, I think less strongly
    flavored than other summer squashes. This website will give you info
    about growing the plant and cooking it:
    http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/chayotes.htm -aem
     
  4. Om,

    I like chayote stemaed with a bit of grated cheddar melted over the
    top.

    Jason
     
  5. Om,

    I like chayote steamed with a bit of grated cheddar melted over the
    top.

    Jason
     
  6. Om wrote:

    > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >
    > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    >
    > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?



    I rarely eat chayote, but it's not bad. In taste, it's somewhere between a
    yellow squash and a cucumber. Googling for posts on how I've used it
    before:

    Tossed salad with spinach, pea sprouts, blanched chayote, avocado, baby
    corn, carrot shreds, and halved grape tomatoes. The dressing is made from
    lime juice, orange juice, safflower oil, dry mustard, salt, pepper, and a
    tiny bit of cayenne.

    Pasta with sausage, scallions, steamed diced chayote, corn, and remoulade
    sauce.

    As a side dish: peel and dice a chayote, then microwave it with lime juice,
    butter, and salt.


    Beyond that, chayote can be baked, stir-fried, eaten raw, stuffed, and so
    forth. If you're growing them in your garden,
    www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/Crops/Chayote.html mentions that the tuberous
    roots are also edible.


    Bob
     
  7. OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    [email protected]:

    > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >
    > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)


    We call them chokoes, here. My mum used to cook choko - I liked it, but
    my dad and sister hated it. Rob won't eat it, so I don't often cook it.
    Years ago, almost everyone had a choko vine in the backyard - especially
    on the wall of the outside toilet. I remember my grandmother talking
    about them being used to bulk out canned pears during the war years, or
    the depression. They will apparently take on other flavours quite easily.

    We usually had them fried or baked. I also like them steamed. Take a look
    at the choko recipes on these sites - maybe there's something there for
    you to try.

    http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/2001/archives/2001_archives?p=1320

    http://www.smh.com.au/news/recipes/chokoes/2006/01/30/1138590426566.html


    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     
  8. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rhonda Anderson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    >[email protected]:
    >
    >> Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >> I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    >> beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)

    >
    >We call them chokoes, here. My mum used to cook choko - I liked it, but
    >my dad and sister hated it. Rob won't eat it, so I don't often cook it.


    They fit the hand perfectly for chucking at stray cats.

    >Years ago, almost everyone had a choko vine in the backyard - especially
    >on the wall of the outside toilet. I remember my grandmother talking
    >about them being used to bulk out canned pears during the war years, or
    >the depression. They will apparently take on other flavours quite easily.


    Because they have no flavour of their own. However, perversely, I do
    quite like them -- usually simply steamed as one of "steak and three
    vegs" for dinner. (Bit like avocados really -- a perfect foil for a
    serve of salt and pepper. :)

    >We usually had them fried or baked. I also like them steamed. Take a look
    >at the choko recipes on these sites - maybe there's something there for
    >you to try.
    >http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/2001/archives/2001_archives?p=1320
    >http://www.smh.com.au/news/recipes/chokoes/2006/01/30/1138590426566.html


    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > Spring planting is right around the corner! <G>


    Chayote is also known as "mirliton".

    > I may grow Okra again this year.


    Why not, it's gorgeous plant.
     
  10. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Rhonda Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    >> Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >>
    >> I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    >> beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)

    >
    > We call them chokoes, here. My mum used to cook choko - I liked it, but
    > my dad and sister hated it. Rob won't eat it, so I don't often cook it.
    > Years ago, almost everyone had a choko vine in the backyard - especially
    > on the wall of the outside toilet. I remember my grandmother talking
    > about them being used to bulk out canned pears during the war years, or
    > the depression. They will apparently take on other flavours quite easily.
    >
    > We usually had them fried or baked. I also like them steamed. Take a look
    > at the choko recipes on these sites - maybe there's something there for
    > you to try.
    >
    > http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/2001/archives/2001_archives?p=1320
    >
    > http://www.smh.com.au/news/recipes/chokoes/2006/01/30/1138590426566.html
    >
    >
    > --
    > Rhonda Anderson
    > Cranebrook, NSW, Australia


    Never hearing of chocko, I googled images to see what they look like.
    I like the fourth one over to the right.
    http://images.google.com/images?q=chokoes&hl=en&btnG=Search+Images

    Recipes:
    http://www.smh.com.au/news/recipes/chokoes/2006/01/30/1138590426566.html

    Dee Dee
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 21:03:58 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...

    >
    > You mean ChaYote? I hear it goes great with [cough] cojita
    > cheese.
    >
    > :)
    >
    > -sw <ducking>


    Coitus cheese??????

    <ducking AND running>
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    > >
    > > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    > >
    > > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?

    >
    > It's a squash that can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw, it's quite crispy
    > and would probably be good with creamy-type dips. You can bake it,
    > saute it, or put it in soups. It's quite tasty, I think less strongly
    > flavored than other summer squashes. This website will give you info
    > about growing the plant and cooking it:
    > http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/chayotes.htm -aem
    >


    Thanks dear!

    If I can just treat it like any other summer squash, I can do that. <G>
    Steamed or fried.......
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    > >
    > > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    > >
    > > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?

    >
    > It's a squash that can be eaten raw or cooked. Raw, it's quite crispy
    > and would probably be good with creamy-type dips. You can bake it,
    > saute it, or put it in soups. It's quite tasty, I think less strongly
    > flavored than other summer squashes. This website will give you info
    > about growing the plant and cooking it:
    > http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/chayotes.htm -aem
    >


    Seems to be reasonably low carb too.
    Thanks for the link!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jason Tinling" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Om,
    >
    > I like chayote steamed with a bit of grated cheddar melted over the
    > top.
    >
    > Jason
    >


    Simple and easy...... :)

    Kinda like cooking zuchinni.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Om wrote:
    >
    > > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    > >
    > > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    > >
    > > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?

    >
    >
    > I rarely eat chayote, but it's not bad. In taste, it's somewhere between a
    > yellow squash and a cucumber. Googling for posts on how I've used it
    > before:
    >
    > Tossed salad with spinach, pea sprouts, blanched chayote, avocado, baby
    > corn, carrot shreds, and halved grape tomatoes. The dressing is made from
    > lime juice, orange juice, safflower oil, dry mustard, salt, pepper, and a
    > tiny bit of cayenne.
    >
    > Pasta with sausage, scallions, steamed diced chayote, corn, and remoulade
    > sauce.
    >
    > As a side dish: peel and dice a chayote, then microwave it with lime juice,
    > butter, and salt.
    >
    >
    > Beyond that, chayote can be baked, stir-fried, eaten raw, stuffed, and so
    > forth. If you're growing them in your garden,
    > www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/Crops/Chayote.html mentions that the tuberous
    > roots are also edible.
    >
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >


    Now _that's_ interesting!
    A dual use plant. :)

    I do quite a bit of stir fry, so that's an idea for a new veggie for it.

    Thanks!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Rhonda Anderson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    > > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    > >
    > > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)

    >
    > We call them chokoes, here. My mum used to cook choko - I liked it, but
    > my dad and sister hated it. Rob won't eat it, so I don't often cook it.
    > Years ago, almost everyone had a choko vine in the backyard - especially
    > on the wall of the outside toilet. I remember my grandmother talking
    > about them being used to bulk out canned pears during the war years, or
    > the depression. They will apparently take on other flavours quite easily.
    >
    > We usually had them fried or baked. I also like them steamed. Take a look
    > at the choko recipes on these sites - maybe there's something there for
    > you to try.
    >
    > http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/2001/archives/2001_archives?p=1320
    >
    > http://www.smh.com.au/news/recipes/chokoes/2006/01/30/1138590426566.html


    So, like winter squashes, they could be used for pies too.

    Thanks!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > I may grow Okra again this year.

    >
    > Why not, it's a gorgeous plant.
    >


    Yes, it is... The blooms are very, very pretty.

    I need to renew the soil on the West side where I usually put them.
    They did not do well last year... I think the soil needs both more
    Nitrogen and bone meal.

    I will also follow the advice of some of the locals from the farmers
    market. Start "topping" the plants at 24" so that they will branch more.

    No 8' tall Okras that I have to gently pull over to harvest. <G>

    I also happen to really like fresh Okra, steamed...
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >
    > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    >
    > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?


    They taste like a kind of zucchini, or other summer squash. They
    have a sticky sap, though, that you have to be careful of when you are
    peeling/cutting them. You can steam them, saute them, roast them,
    treat them as any other summer squash.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    > >
    > > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    > >
    > > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?

    >
    > They taste like a kind of zucchini, or other summer squash. They
    > have a sticky sap, though, that you have to be careful of when you are
    > peeling/cutting them. You can steam them, saute them, roast them,
    > treat them as any other summer squash.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    Thanks Ranee!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  20. SD

    SD Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > Ranee mentioned Chaote squash in one of her posts...
    >
    > I've only ever used it for planting in the garden as it makes a
    > beautiful vine. I've never actually cooked nor eaten it. ;-)
    >
    > What does it taste like and how would I prepare it?
    >


    Chayote...also known as pataste (at least here in Honduras). It's a
    staple. Slice it and steam with other veggies for a mixed vegetable
    dish. It's also used in vegetable soups. It has a very bland taste.

    SD
     
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