Charcoal seasoning?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scot, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Scot

    Scot Guest

    Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled "charcoal
    seasoning." It had an appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting any
    type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    anything about it -- if it's still manufactured, and where it is?
     
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  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 04:08:10 GMT, "Scot"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    >Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled "charcoal
    >seasoning." It had an appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting any
    >type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    >anything about it -- if it's still manufactured, and where it is?

    Is it charcoal-flavored or to be used to season charcoal?

    It sure sounds nasty, whatever it is. "Grilled seasoning" sounds better.

    Smoked salt comes to mind. Was it a smoke flavor, or a grilled flavor? There is an commercial
    product used by food service corporations (Tyson, ie), but as far as I know it's not available to
    the public due to trademarks and royalty issues.

    -sw
     
  3. Scot

    Scot Guest

    "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 04:08:10 GMT, "Scot" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    > >Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled "charcoal
    > >seasoning." It had an appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting
    any
    > >type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    > >anything about it -- if it's still manufactured, and where it is?
    >
    > Is it charcoal-flavored or to be used to season charcoal?
    >
    > It sure sounds nasty, whatever it is. "Grilled seasoning" sounds better.
    >
    > Smoked salt comes to mind. Was it a smoke flavor, or a grilled flavor? There is an commercial
    > product used by food service corporations (Tyson, ie), but as far as I know it's not available to
    > the public due to trademarks and royalty issues.
    >
    > -sw

    It was a charcoal-smokey-grilled seasoning. HA! I don't know. It gave you a taste and smell of food
    that had been grilled over real coals -- a great smokey flavor. It was a seasoning that you'd rub on
    meat, or shake into the cavity of a bird before roasting just as you would with any other seasoning
    of choice. Again, it was dry, came in a common-size seasoning bottle, and it looked very similar to
    black pepper. I don't recall it being a salt. My guess is that it definitely was NOT a salt.
     
  4. Tex Mexican

    Tex Mexican Guest

    "Scot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    > Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled "charcoal
    > seasoning." It had an appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting
    any
    > type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    > anything about it -- if it's still manufactured, and where it is?
    >
    It was cancelled for health reasons. It contained smoke solids that were implicated in increased
    instances of colon cancer.
     
  5. Scot

    Scot Guest

    "Tex Mexican" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:sT%[email protected]...
    >
    > "Scot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    > > Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled
    > > "charcoal seasoning." It had
    an
    > > appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting
    > any
    > > type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    > > anything about it -- if it's still
    manufactured,
    > > and where it is?
    > >
    > It was cancelled for health reasons. It contained smoke solids that were implicated in increased
    > instances of colon cancer.

    Interesting. Just out of curiosity, do you recall who manufactured it, or any other details?
     
  6. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    Scot wrote:

    > Looking for a charcoal seasoning. Several years ago, one of the major brands of seasoning that
    > Safeway carries had a charcoal seasoning in its line. I believe it was actually labeled "charcoal
    > seasoning." It had an appearance similar to black pepper. It was a perfect "rub" for roasting any
    > type of poultry, meat or fish. I haven't been able to find it in many years. Does anyone know
    > anything about it -- if it's still manufactured, and where it is?

    I used to use something by McCormick called Hickory Salt. I know you said it wasn't a salt, but this
    was pretty nice. I haven't seen it in a few years tho. I do use Wright's bottled liquid smoke (at my
    regular grocery), both hickory and mesquite, which do not contain any carbonaceous dingies that
    might cause cancer, according to them. Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle with a
    little chile powder? Edrena
     
  7. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 05 Mar 2004 14:29:22 GMT, "Scot"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Tex Mexican" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:sT%[email protected]...

    >> It was cancelled for health reasons. It contained smoke solids that were implicated in increased
    >> instances of colon cancer.
    >
    >Interesting. Just out of curiosity, do you recall who manufactured it, or any other details?

    I think she was joking. Smoke solids are <cough> good for you. As far as I know, BBQ is still legal
    (except on your balcony in Texas).

    -sw
     
  8. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle with a
    > little chile powder?

    Yuck.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  9. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle with
    > > a little chile powder?
    >
    > Yuck.

    Yer not supposta pour it on, just a little taste. But yer
    right, there's lots of things better.
    E.
     
  10. beetle

    beetle Guest

    There is a "bar-b-q" sauce called Woody's Smoke-In sauce. I
    think sold at Safeway, but still not hard to find. It has a
    very smokey flavor and is quite good. Great for pot-roasts
    and crockpot meals. I haven't bought it in the past few
    years, but keep meaning to huint some down.

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 16:52:24 GMT, The Joneses
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle
    >> > with a little chile powder?
    >>
    >> Yuck.
    >
    >Yer not supposta pour it on, just a little taste. But yer
    >right, there's lots of things better.
    >E.
     
  11. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 12:31:42 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] wrote:

    >In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle with
    >> a little chile powder?

    >Yuck.

    There's nothing wrong with using liquid smoke wisely, just
    don't expect it to taste (nor call it) BBQ.

    -sw
     
  12. Scot

    Scot Guest

    "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > > > Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle
    > > > with a little chile powder?
    > >
    > > Yuck.
    >
    > Yer not supposta pour it on, just a little taste. But yer
    > right, there's lots of things better.
    > E.

    What is the best seasoning to use to get a smokey
    flavor indoors?
     
  13. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Scot <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What is the best seasoning to use to get a smokey flavor
    > indoors?

    I use my fireplace flue. After the steaks are done, I
    arrange a few logs over the remnants of the charcoal.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  14. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    Scot wrote:

    > "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > > > In rec.food.cooking, The Joneses <[email protected]>
    > > > wrote:
    > > > > Howsabout sprinkling liquid smoke on meat, sprinkle
    > > > > with a little chile powder?
    > > > Yuck.
    > > Yer not supposta pour it on, just a little taste. But
    > > yer right, there's lots of things better.
    > What is the best seasoning to use to get a smokey flavor
    > indoors?

    I use a drop or four of the liquid stuff; a little goes a
    long way. OTH, I remember a TV chef preparing a smoked fish
    filet or chicken or something by packaging a tablespoon of
    brown sugar in tinfoil in the bottom of a deep dutch oven
    sort of thing, meat on rack above, tight lid, 30 minutes
    cooking? I can't remember exactly how it was done, but the
    burn sugar was nice smoke and clean up wasn't too hard
    thanks to the tinfoil. I truly don't remember all the
    particulars, but your experiments will prove whether or not
    that smoke alarm needs a battery (g). Edrena
     
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